Marianne Hough

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Last Updated on June 7, 2022, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 173

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This modern-day girls' story [The Girl Who Knew Tomorrow] achieves nothing and goes nowhere…. Angie's father deserts his wife and two daughters, leaving conflict between Mother and Grandmother (the one who most selflessly cares for sensitive, bewildered Angie). When the girl's special gift becomes known, her lonely mother is influenced by the attentions of a man who persuades the family to exploit her…. Finally, her beloved Grandmother dies, but not before Angie has been transferred mentally for a deathbed conversation in the old woman's room thousands of miles away. The final message to Angie is, of course, to give it all up until her gift can be used only for helping others. If readers could, first of all, accept the easily-come-by use of second sight, they would still find the predictable ending a letdown. Touching on much, exploring little in depth, this novel is scarcely above women's pulp-magazine level.

Marianne Hough, in a review of "The Girl Who Knew Tomorrow," in School Library Journal, an appendix to Library Journal, Vol. 17, No. 4, December, 1970, p. 66.

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