"Whistle And She'll Come To You"

(Magill's Quotations in Context)

Context: Isabel, younger sister of the rich Widow, sees young Francisco and falls in love with him. Francisco's elder brother, Valentine, has spent all of his own money and has also squandered Francisco's annuity, leaving him penniless. Isabel has a man present Francisco with a bag of money, and for the time he is ignorant of the identity of the real donor. When the Widow discovers that Isabel has fallen in love with Francisco, she moves to block the romance by taking her household out of the city into the country. When preparations for the move are almost completed, the Widow meets Valentine, who has forced his way into the house. Instantly she falls in love with him and countermands the orders to vacate her residence. After Valentine leaves, Francisco appears, having learned that it was Isabel who sent him the money; he is accompanied by his friend Lance, a falconer who uses the language of falconry, to thank her for her gift. Because her sister, the Widow, is present during the interview, she denies having given him anything and treats him with contempt. She, however, presents him with a valuable ring which she says he has dropped. He is about to vow that he has done no such thing, but Isabel will not listen to him:


FRANCISCO
I vow–
ISABEL
Vow me no vows. He that dares do this has bred himself to boldness, to forswear, too. There, take your gewgaw. You are too much pampered, and I repeat my part; as you grow older, grow wiser, if you can. And so farewell, sir. [Exeunt ISABEL and LUCE.]
LANCE
Grow wiser, if you can? She has put it to you. 'Tis a rich ring. Did you drop it?
FRANCISCO
Never; ne'er saw it afore, Lance.
LANCE
Thereby hangs a tail, then. What slight she makes to catch herself! Look up, sir; you cannot lose her if you would. How daintily she flies upon the lure, and cunningly she makes her stoop. Whistle and she'll come to you.
FRANCISCO
I would I were so happy.