William Braithwaite Further Reading - Essay

Further Reading

(Poetry Criticism)

BIBLIOGRAPHIES

Barton, Rebecca Chalmers. “Introduction to a fragment of The House under Arcturus by William Stanley Braithwaite.” In Witnesses for Freedom: Negro Americans in Autobiography, edited by Rebecca Chalmers Barton, pp. 93-100. Oakdale, N.Y.: Dowling College Press, 1976.

Discusses Braithwaite's autobiography covering his first twenty-one years of life.

Butcher, Philip. “William Stanley Braithwaite and the College Language Association.” CLA Journal 15, no. 2 (December 1971): 117-25.

Discusses Braithwaite's refusal in 1938 to join the organization that would later become the College Language Association.

Butcher, Philip. Introduction to The William Stanley Braithwaite Reader, edited by Philip Butcher, pp. 1-7. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1972.

Provides an overview of Braithwaite's life and career.

Clairmonte, Glenn. “The Cup-Bearer: William Stanley Braithwaite of Boston.” CLA Journal 17, no. 1 (September 1973): 101-08.

Brief biographical essay by a personal friend and colleague of Braithwaite.

CRITICISM

Monroe, Harriet. “Sir Oracle.” Poetry: A Magazine of Verse 9, no. 4 (January 1917): 211-14.

Disputes Braithwaite's critical assessments of the poetry of Carl Sandburg and Ezra Pound and questions his methods in selecting and assigning labels of distinction on various poets in his anthologies.

Teresa, Sister Frances. “Poets' Discoverer.” Phylon 5, no. 4 (1944): 375-78.

Praises Braithwaite for his early recognition of the talents of such poets as Robert Frost, Stephen Vincent Benét, and William Rose Benét.

Thomas, Lorenzo. “William Stanley Braithwaite and Harriet Monroe: The Battle for New Poetry.” In Extraordinary Measures: Afrocentric Modernism and Twentieth-Century American Poetry, pp. 45-75. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2000.

Recounts the aesthetic and philosophical differences between Braithwaite and Monroe, suggesting that Braithwaite has been unfairly treated by scholars and literary historians.

Williams, Kenny J. “An Invisible Partnership and An Unlikely Relationship: William Stanley Braithwaite and Harriet Monroe.” Callaloo 10, no. 3 (summer 1987): 516-50.

Discusses the rivalry between Braithwaite and Monroe and suggests that Braithwaite's influence on early twentieth-century American poetry was greater than generally acknowledged by literary historians.

Additional coverage of Braithwaite's life and career is contained in the following sources published by the Gale Group: Black Literature Criticism, Ed. 1; Black Writers, Ed. 1; Contemporary Authors, Vol. 125; Dictionary of Literary Biography, Vols. 50, 54; DISCovering Authors Modules; Harlem Renaissance: A Gale Critical Companion, Ed. 2; and Literature Resource Center.