Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been? Connections and Further Reading
by Joyce Carol Oates

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Bibliography

(Masterpieces of American Literature)

Suggested Readings

Johnson, Greg. Understanding Joyce Carol Oates. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1987.

Pearlman, Mickey, ed. American Women Writing Fiction: Memory, Identity, Family, Space. Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1989.

Winslow, Joan D. “The Stranger Within: Two Stories by Oates and Hawthorne.” Studies in Short Fiction 17 (1980): 263-268.

Bibliography and Further Reading

(Short Stories for Students)

Sources

Gilman, Richard, Review or The Wheel of Love, in Ne w York Times Book Review, October 25, 1970, p. 4.

Long, Robert Emmet, Review of Wheel of Love, in Saturday Review, October 24, 1970, p. 36.

Oates, Joyce Carol, '"Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?' and Smooth Talk: Short Story into Film," in (Woman) Writer: Occasions and Opportunities, Dutton, 1988, pp. 316-21.

Quirk, Tom, "A Source for 'Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?'" Studies in Short Fiction, Vol. 18, no. 4, Fall, 1981, pp. 413-19.

Review of Wheel of Love, in Virginia Quarterly Review, Vol. 47, no. 1, Winter, 1971, p. xv.

Sullivan, Walter, "The Artificial Demon: Joyce Carol Oates and the Dimensions of the Real," The Hollins Critic, Vol. 9, no. 4, December, 1972, pp. 1-12.

Waller, G. F., Dreaming America: Obsession and Transcendence in the Fiction of Joyce Carol Oates, Louisiana State University Press, 1979.

Further Reading

Clemons, Walter, ''Joyce Carol Oates: Love and Violence," in Conversations with Joyce Carol Oates, edited by Lee Milazzo, University Press of Mississippi, 1989, pp 32-41.

Clemens discusses Oates as a chronicler of the way people live in the contemporary world.

Creighton, Joanne V., Joyce Carol Oates, Twayne, 1979, p. 173.

Creighton analyzes the complete body of Oates's fiction through 1979.

Johnson, Greg, Understanding Joyce Carol Oates, University of South Carolina Press, 1987, p. 224.

Johnson presents analyses of Oates's fiction.

Moser, Don, "The Pied Piper of Tucson," Life, March 4, 1966, pp. 18-24 and 80-90C.

This journalistic treatment of an Arizona mass murderer provides many parallels to Oates's story, and she has since confirmed that her inspiration for ''Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?'' came from reading this article and from Moser's presentation of the charismatic killer Charles Schrind.

Myers, George, "Oates Writes Out of 'Fascination,' Not Zeal," in Conversations with Joyce Carol Oates, edited by Lee Milazzo, University Press of Mississippi, 1989, pp. 181-85.

Oates talks about her work as a reader, writer, and critic.

Wagner, Linda W., "Joyce Carol Oates: The Changing Shapes of Her Realities," an introduction to Critical Essays on Joyce Carol Oates, G.K. Hall & Co., 1979, p. 180.

Overall appraisal of Oates's work and discussion of the author's effect on the American literary scene.

(The entire section is 1,175 words.)