Bibliography

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Suggested Readings

Johnson, Greg. Understanding Joyce Carol Oates. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1987.

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Pearlman, Mickey, ed. American Women Writing Fiction: Memory, Identity, Family, Space. Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1989.

Winslow, Joan D. “The Stranger Within: Two Stories by Oates and Hawthorne.” Studies in Short Fiction 17 (1980): 263-268.

Bibliography and Further Reading

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Sources

Gilman, Richard, Review or The Wheel of Love, in Ne w York Times Book Review, October 25, 1970, p. 4.

Long, Robert Emmet, Review of Wheel of Love, in Saturday Review, October 24, 1970, p. 36.

Oates, Joyce Carol, '"Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?' and Smooth Talk: Short Story into Film," in (Woman) Writer: Occasions and Opportunities, Dutton, 1988, pp. 316-21.

Quirk, Tom, "A Source for 'Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?'" Studies in Short Fiction, Vol. 18, no. 4, Fall, 1981, pp. 413-19.

Review of Wheel of Love, in Virginia Quarterly Review, Vol. 47, no. 1, Winter, 1971, p. xv.

Sullivan, Walter, "The Artificial Demon: Joyce Carol Oates and the Dimensions of the Real," The Hollins Critic, Vol. 9, no. 4, December, 1972, pp. 1-12.

Waller, G. F., Dreaming America: Obsession and Transcendence in the Fiction of Joyce Carol Oates, Louisiana State University Press, 1979.

Further Reading

Clemons, Walter, ''Joyce Carol Oates: Love and Violence," in Conversations with Joyce Carol Oates, edited by Lee Milazzo, University Press of Mississippi, 1989, pp 32-41.

Clemens discusses Oates as a chronicler of the way people live in the contemporary world.

Creighton, Joanne V., Joyce Carol Oates, Twayne, 1979, p. 173.

Creighton analyzes the complete body of Oates's fiction through 1979.

Johnson, Greg, Understanding Joyce Carol Oates, University of South Carolina Press, 1987, p. 224.

Johnson presents analyses of Oates's fiction.

Moser, Don, "The Pied Piper of Tucson," Life, March 4, 1966, pp. 18-24 and 80-90C.

This journalistic treatment of an Arizona mass murderer provides many parallels to Oates's story, and she has since confirmed that her inspiration for ''Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?'' came from reading this article and from Moser's presentation of the charismatic killer Charles Schrind.

Myers, George, "Oates Writes Out of 'Fascination,' Not Zeal," in Conversations with Joyce Carol Oates, edited by Lee Milazzo, University Press of Mississippi, 1989, pp. 181-85.

Oates talks about her work as a reader, writer, and critic.

Wagner, Linda W., "Joyce Carol Oates: The Changing Shapes of Her Realities," an introduction to Critical Essays on Joyce Carol Oates, G.K. Hall & Co., 1979, p. 180.

Overall appraisal of Oates's work and discussion of the author's effect on the American literary scene.

Media Adaptations

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"Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?" was adapted as a film, Smooth Talk, directed by Joyce Chopra and starring Laura Dern, Treat Williams, and Mary Kay Place. It was originally produced in 1985 for the "American Playhouse Series" on the Public Broadcasting System and is available from Live Home Video and Vestron Video.

For Further Reference

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Johnson, Greg. Understanding Joyce Carol Oates. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1987, 224 p. A sympathetic biography of Oates that discusses many of her works.

"Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?" In Literature and Its Times: Profiles of 300 Notable Literary Works and the Historical Events that Influenced Them, Volume 4: World War II to the Affluent Fifties (1940-1950s). Edited by Joyce Moss and George Wilson. Detroit: Gale, 1997. An overview of "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?" that places the story in its historical context.

Oates, Joyce Carol. "An Interview with Joyce Carol Oates." Compiled by David Y. Todd. The Gettysburg Review 6 (Spring 1993): 291-99. A compilation of an interview Oates conducted at Bellarmine College in which she discusses her writing methods, literary influences, and recurring themes in her work.

Slimp, Stephen. "Oates's 'Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?'" The Explicator 7 (Spring 1999): 179-82. Slimp concentrates on the carefully wrought, rising tension in Oates's story, asserting that the work symbolizes the decay of modern America.

Urbanski, Marie Mitchell Olesen. "Existential Allegory: Joyce Carol Oates's 'Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?'" Studies in Short Fiction 15 (Spring 1978): 200-3. Urbanski theorizes that "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?" is a contemporary religious allegory, similar to the seduction of Eve, and deals with the acceptance of fate.

Wagner, Linda W. "Oates: The Changing Shape of Her Realities." Great Lakes Review 5 (Winter 1979). Wagner argues that Oates focuses more on the examination of the boundaries between reality and illusion and is less concerned with technical precision or innovation.

Wesley, Marilyn C. "Joyce Carol Oates." In Dictionary of Literary Biography, Volume 130: American Short Story Writers Since World War II. Edited by Patrick Meanor. Detroit: Gale, 1993, pp. 241-52. A biographical sketch on Oates.

——. Wesley, Marilyn C. "The Transgressive Other in Joyce Carol Oates's Recent Fiction." Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction XXXII (Summer 1992): 255-62. Wesley examines Oates's later fiction for the recurring theme of the "transgressive other."

Wilkie, Brian. "Joyce Carol Oates: Overview." In Reference Guide to Short Fiction. Edited by Noelle Watson. Detroit: St. James Press, 1994. An overview of Oates's fiction.

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Historical and Social Context