Robert Asahina

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Last Updated on June 7, 2022, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 105

Herzog's Nosferatu is an esthetic triumph. A feeling of subtle horror practically oozes from the screen—a remarkable achievement, considering that the director managed it with techniques and imagery (the soft-focus pastels) not normally associated with horror films. Yet if this film may be a feast for the eyes, it is...

(The entire section contains 105 words.)

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Herzog's Nosferatu is an esthetic triumph. A feeling of subtle horror practically oozes from the screen—a remarkable achievement, considering that the director managed it with techniques and imagery (the soft-focus pastels) not normally associated with horror films. Yet if this film may be a feast for the eyes, it is dreary for the mind. No amount of directorial prestidigitation can disguise the bareness of the material. One wishes that Herzog had chosen a more worthy vehicle for his talents. (p. 24)

Robert Asahina, "Novels into Films," in The New Leader (© 1979 by the American Labor Conference on International Affairs, Inc.), Vol. LXII, No. 21, November 5, 1979, pp. 23-4.∗

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