Style and Technique

(Comprehensive Guide to Short Stories, Critical Edition)

Bradbury’s style is marked by lyricism and a profusion of metaphors. In “The Veldt,” these create an illusion of reality that brilliantly mirrors the deceptions that the characters in the story undergo. His description of the electronically produced African veldt contains such exact sensory details that it almost seems to be real, and indeed it is by the story’s end. Moreover, his description of the veldt also conveys an atmosphere of menace and hostility mirroring the psychological state of the Hadley family. In a similar fashion, Bradbury employs active verbs and personifications, describing the workings of the house’s mechanical devices in a way that suggests the living, human quality that the house is acquiring. When the devices are turned off, the house is a “mechanical cemetery,” reinforcing the idea that the house is a living thing.

Characteristically, Bradbury’s poetic style transports the reader out of the everyday world and into a fantasy world, often reminiscent of the unchecked imagination of childhood. The world of “The Veldt” is one in which childhood fantasies are made concrete. Hence, the story has an air of unreality about it as if it were simply a child’s daydream of a world in which children have the power and competence given to adults and adults have the helplessness of children.

This dreamlike quality is counterbalanced by the use of clichés and advertising language, which levels a satiric thrust against modern society. Phrases such as “nothing’s too good for our children” and “every home should have one” direct attention to the permissiveness, commercialism, and worship of material comforts that dominate American life. These serve to anchor the bizarre events of the story in an objective framework and give the child’s daydream an adult moral.