Further Reading

Download PDF PDF Page Citation Cite Share Link Share

Last Updated on June 7, 2022, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 423

CRITICISM

Appelbaum, David. “Point of Return: An Interview with Ursula K. Le Guin.” Parabola XXIII, No. 1 (February 1998): 19-27.

Le Guin comments on the significance of the millenium, historical and mythical memory, and the nature of time.

Kaler, Anne K. “‘Carving in Water’: Journey/Journals and the Images of Women's...

(The entire section contains 423 words.)

See This Study Guide Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this study guide. You'll also get access to more than 30,000 additional guides and more than 350,000 Homework Help questions answered by our experts.

Get 48 Hours Free Access

CRITICISM

Appelbaum, David. “Point of Return: An Interview with Ursula K. Le Guin.” Parabola XXIII, No. 1 (February 1998): 19-27.

Le Guin comments on the significance of the millenium, historical and mythical memory, and the nature of time.

Kaler, Anne K. “‘Carving in Water’: Journey/Journals and the Images of Women's Writings in Ursula Le Guin's ‘Sur.’” LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory 7, No. 1 (January 1996): 51-62.

Provides analysis of the short story “Sur,” drawing attention to feminist themes associated with journal writing and the journey motif in the narrative.

Marcus, Daniel. Review of The Language of the Night. Whole Earth Review 82 (Spring 1994): 47.

Offers a favorable evaluation of The Language of the Night.

McCaffery, Larry, and Sinda Gregory. “An Interview with Ursula K. Le Guin.” In Across the Wounded Galaxies: Interviews with Contemporary American Science Fiction Writers, edited by Larry McCaffery, pp. 151-75. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1990.

Le Guin discusses her writing, formative influences, literary career, artistic preoccupations, and the science fiction genre.

Selinger, Bernard. “The Personal Is the Political.” In Le Guin and Identity in Contemporary Fiction, pp. 149-56. Ann Arbor, MI: UMI Research Press, 1988.

Examines the struggle among Le Guin's protagonists to integrate self-identity and communion, a psychological dilemma that he compares to the mental state of autism and the creative artist.

Spivack, Charlotte. Ursula K. Le Guin. Boston: Twayne, 1984, 182 pp.

A book-length collection of critical essays that provides plot summary and analysis of Le Guin's major novels, short fiction, and essays.

Tuttle, Lisa. “Animal Relations.” Times Literary Supplement (18-24 May 1990): 534.

A positive review of Buffalo Gals.

Walsh, William. “I Am A Woman Writer; I Am A Western Writer: An Interview with Ursula Le Guin.” Kenyon Review XVII, Nos. 3-4 (Summer-Fall 1995): 192-205.

Le Guin discusses science fiction literature and narrow critical conceptions of the genre, the continuing lack of female writers in the literary canon, and her own fiction and feminist perspective.

Additional coverage of Le Guin's life and career is contained in the following sources published by the Gale Group: Authors and Artists for Young Adults, Vols. 9, 27; Authors in the News, Vol. 1; Children's Literature Review, Vols. 3, 28; Concise Dictionary of American Literary Biography, 1968-1988; Contemporary Authors, Vols. 21-24R; Contemporary Authors New Revision Series, Vols. 9, 32, 52, 74; Dictionary of Literary Biography, Vols. 8, 52; DISCovering Authors: British; DISCovering Authors: Canadian; DISCovering Authors Modules: Most-Studied Authors, Popular Fiction and Genre Authors; DISCovering Authors 3.0;Junior DISCovering Authors; Major Authors and Illustrators for Children and Young Adults; Major 20th-Century Writers, Vols. 1, 2; Novels for Students, Vol. 9; Short Stories for Students, Vol. 2; Short Story Criticism, Vol. 12; and Something About the Author, Vols. 4, 52, 99.

Illustration of PDF document

Download Ursula K. Le Guin Study Guide

Subscribe Now
Previous

Ursula K. Le Guin Long Fiction Analysis

Next

Le Guin, Ursula K(roeber) (Vol. 13)