U.S. v. Leon Primary Source eText

Primary Source

Supreme Court decision

By: Byron White and William J. Brennan

Date: July 5, 1984

Source: White, Byron and William J. Brennan. United States v. Leon, 468 U.S. 897. Available online at http://laws.findlaw.com/us/468/897.html; website home page: http://laws.findlaw.com (accessed April 19, 2003).

About the Authors: Byron White (1917–2002) was a Rhodes scholar and talented athlete in college. In 1938, he led the National Football League in rushing. He served as deputy attorney general in the Kennedy administration. From 1962 to 1993, he served on the U.S. Supreme Court. William Brennan (1906–1997) attended law school at Harvard. In 1952, he was appointed to New Jersey's highest court. He joined the U.S. Supreme Court in 1957 and served until 1990.

Introduction

A sizable number of American colonists made their living by smuggling goods into the United States. To bring an end to this practice, the British issued general warrants allowing any area to be searched and any illegal items to be seized, a practice that outraged many colonists. Accordingly, the Bill of Rights includes the Fourth Amendment, which states that "the right of the people to be secure …against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause …and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." This amendment, though, provides no penalty for violations, and throughout the nineteenth century, courts generally allowed the use of evidence seized illegally.

In 1914, the Supreme Court created the "exclusionary rule": evidence seized without a warrant cannot be used in trial in a federal court. It was unclear, though, whether this rule applied to the states. In 1949 and 1954, the Supreme Court refused to apply the Fourth Amendment to the states. The question arose again in 1961, when the Supreme Court extended the exclusionary rule to the states in Mapp v. Ohio. This ruling was heavily criticized by those who felt that the exclusionary rule allowed criminals to go free because of a "technicality." Some justices on the Supreme Court began to argue for a "good faith" exception, allowing evidence seized with an invalid warrant as long as the officers with that warrant were acting in "good faith," believing the warrant to be valid. This issue arose in U.S. v. Leon.

Significance

At issue in Leon was the legality of a drug search. On the basis of a search warrant that appeared to be valid, police officers conducted a search and found incriminating evidence. Later, though, it was determined that the warrant was not valid, and the accused moved to suppress all evidence seized based on the warrant. When the lower court and court of appeals agreed, the government appealed to the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court overturned the lower courts and upheld the legality of the search, even though it had been undertaken with an invalid warrant. Thus, by a 6 to 3 vote, the Court created a "good faith" exception to the exclusionary rule. The majority opinion of Justice White "balanced" the costs to the defendant versus the "benefits" to society, and ruled that that benefits to society outweigh the costs to the defendant. The three dissenters, however, pointed out that privacy and liberty guaranteed by the Fourth Amendment were being sacrificed for the goal of crime prevention.

Since Leon, the Supreme Court has generally narrowed the Fourth Amendment. Without a warrant, in some circumstances, it has allowed mandatory drug testing of employees and students. This drug testing is not a "seizure" in the Fourth Amendment sense of the word. The Court has also given police increased latitude in their searches and has generally restricted the rights of those already convicted.

Primary Source: U.S. v. Leon [excerpt]

SYNOPSIS: Justice White comments that the exclusionary rule is not required by the Fourth Amendment and has "cost" society a great deal. White then argues for a "good faith" exception, stating that in this case, the exclusionary rule has no deterrent effect. Justice Brennan, in his dissent, argues that the "good faith" exception destroys the Fourth Amendment and that "weighing" the costs to the defendant of his loss of rights against the "benefits" to society destroys important freedoms.

Justice White delivered the opinion of the Court.…

The Fourth Amendment contains no provision expressly precluding the use of evidence obtained in violation of its commands, and an examination of its origin and purposes makes clear that the use of fruits of a past unlawful search or seizure "work[s] no new Fourth Amendment wrong." …The wrong condemned by the Amendment is "fully accomplished" by the unlawful search or seizure itself, ibid., and the exclusionary rule is neither intended nor able to "cure the invasion of the defendant's rights which he has already suffered.". . .

The substantial social costs exacted by the exclusionary rule for the vindication of Fourth Amendment rights have long been a source of concern.… An objectionable collateral consequence of this interference with the criminal justice system's truth-finding function is that some guilty defendants may go free or receive reduced sentences as a result of favorable plea bargains. Particularly when law enforcement officers have acted in objective good faith or their transgressions have been minor, the magnitude of the benefit conferred on such guilty defendants offends basic concepts of the criminal justice system.…

As yet, we have not recognized any form of good-faith exception to the Fourth Amendment exclusionary rule. But the balancing approach that has evolved during the years of experience with the rule provides strong support for the modification currently urged upon us. As we discuss below, our evaluation of the costs and benefits of suppressing reliable physical evidence seized by officers reasonably relying on a warrant issued by a detached and neutral magistrate leads to the conclusion that such evidence should be admissible in the prosecution's case in chief.

Because a search warrant "provides the detached scrutiny of a neutral magistrate, which is a more reliable safeguard against improper searches than the hurried judgment of a law enforcement officer 'engaged in the often competitive enterprise of ferreting out crime,'" …we have expressed a strong preference for warrants and declared that "in a doubtful or marginal case a search under a warrant may be sustainable where without one it would fall." …Reasonable minds frequently may differ on the question whether a particular affidavit establishes probable cause, and we have thus concluded that the preference for warrants is most appropriately effectuated by according "great deference" to a magistrate's determination.…

Deference to the magistrate, however, is not boundless. It is clear, first, that the deference accorded to a magistrate's finding of probable cause does not preclude inquiry into the knowing or reckless falsity of the affidavit on which that determination was based.… Second, the courts must also insist that the magistrate purport to "perform his 'neutral and detached' function and not serve merely as a rubber stamp for the police." …A magistrate failing to "manifest that neutrality and detachment demanded of a judicial officer when presented with a warrant application" and who acts instead as "an adjunct law enforcement officer" cannot provide valid authorization for an otherwise unconstitutional search.…

Third, reviewing courts will not defer to a warrant based on an affidavit that does not "provide the magistrate with a substantial basis for determining the existence of probable cause.". . .

Only in the first of these three situations, however, has the Court set forth a rationale for suppressing evidence obtained pursuant to a search warrant; in the other areas, it has simply excluded such evidence without considering whether Fourth Amendment interests will be advanced. To the extent that proponents of exclusion rely on its behavioral effects on judges and magistrates in these areas, their reliance is misplaced. First, the exclusionary rule is designed to deter police misconduct rather than to punish the errors of judges and magistrates. Second, there exists no evidence suggesting that judges and magistrates are inclined to ignore or subvert the Fourth Amendment or that lawlessness among these actors requires application of the extreme sanction of exclusion.

Third, and most important, we discern no basis, and are offered none, for believing that exclusion of evidence seized pursuant to a warrant will have a significant deterrent effect on the issuing judge or magistrate. Many of the factors that indicate that the exclusionary rule cannot provide an effective "special" or "general" deterrent for individual offending law enforcement officers apply as well to judges or magistrates. And, to the extent that the rule is thought to operate as a "systemic" deterrent on a wider audience, it clearly can have no such effect on individuals empowered to issue search warrants. Judges and magistrates are not adjuncts to the law enforcement team; as neutral judicial officers, they have no stake in the outcome of particular criminal prosecutions. The threat of exclusion thus cannot be expected significantly to deter them. Imposition of the exclusionary sanction is not necessary meaningfully to inform judicial officers of their errors, and we cannot conclude that admitting evidence obtained pursuant to a warrant while at the same time declaring that the warrant was somehow defective will in any way reduce judicial officers' professional incentives to comply with the Fourth Amendment, encourage them to repeat their mistakes, or lead to the granting of all colorable warrant requests.…

We have frequently questioned whether the exclusionary rule can have any deterrent effect when the offending officers acted in the objectively reasonable belief that their conduct did not violate the Fourth Amendment.…

This is particularly true, we believe, when an officer acting with objective good faith has obtained a search warrant from a judge or magistrate and acted within its scope. In most such cases, there is no police illegality and thus nothing to deter. It is the magistrate's responsibility to determine whether the officer's allegations establish probable cause and, if so, to issue a warrant comporting in form with the requirements of the Fourth Amendment.… Penal izing the officer for the magistrate's error, rather than his own, cannot logically contribute to the deterrence of Fourth Amendment violations.

We conclude that the marginal or nonexistent benefits produced by suppressing evidence obtained in objectively reasonable reliance on a subsequently invalidated search warrant cannot justify the substantial costs of exclusion.…

Suppression therefore remains an appropriate remedy if the magistrate or judge in issuing a warrant was misled by information in an affidavit that the affiant knew was false or would have known was false except for his reckless disregard of the truth.…

In so limiting the suppression remedy, we leave untouched the probable-cause standard and the various requirements for a valid warrant.…

In the absence of an allegation that the magistrate abandoned his detached and neutral role, suppression is appropriate only if the officers were dishonest or reckless in preparing their affidavit or could not have harbored an objectively reasonable belief in the existence of probable cause. Only respondent Leon has contended that no reasonably well trained police officer could have believed that there existed probable cause to search his house; significantly, the other respondents advance no comparable argument. Officer Rombach's application for a warrant clearly was supported by much more than a "bare bones" affidavit. The affidavit related the results of an extensive investigation and, as the opinions of the divided panel of the Court of Appeals make clear, provided evidence sufficient to create disagreement among thoughtful and competent judges as to the existence of probable cause. Under these circumstances, the officers' reliance on the magistrate's determination of probable cause was objectively reasonable, and application of the extreme sanction of exclusion is inappropriate.…

Justice Brennan, with whom Justice Marshall joins, dissenting.

…in case after case, I have witnessed the Court's gradual but determined strangulation of the rule. It now appears that the Court's victory over the Fourth Amendment is complete. That today's decisions represent the piece de resistance of the Court's past efforts cannot be doubted, for today the Court sanctions the use in the prosecution's case in chief of illegally obtained evidence against the individual whose rights have been violated—a result that had previously been thought to be foreclosed.

The Court seeks to justify this result on the ground that the "costs" of adhering to the exclusionary rule in cases like those before us exceed the "benefits." But the language of deterrence and of cost/benefit analysis, if used indiscriminately, can have a narcotic effect. It creates an illusion of technical precision and ineluctability. It suggests that not only constitutional principle but also empirical data support the majority's result. When the Court's analysis is examined carefully, however, it is clear that we have not been treated to an honest assessment of the merits of the exclusionary rule, but have instead been drawn into a curious world where the "costs" of excluding illegally obtained evidence loom to exaggerated heights and where the "benefits" of such exclusion are made to disappear with a mere wave of the hand.

The majority ignores the fundamental constitutional importance of what is at stake here.… what the Framers understood …remains true today—that the task of combating crime and convicting the guilty will in every era seem of such critical and pressing concern that we may be lured by the temptations of expediency into forsaking our commitment to protecting individual liberty and privacy.…

At bottom, the Court's decision turns on the proposition that the exclusionary rule is merely a "'judicially created remedy designed to safeguard Fourth Amendment rights generally through its deterrent effect, rather than a personal constitutional right.'" …The germ of that idea is found in Wolf v. Colorado …and although I had thought that such a narrow conception of the rule had been forever put to rest by our decision in Mapp v. Ohio …it has been revived by the present Court and reaches full flower with today's decision.… This reading of the Amendment implies that its proscriptions are directed solely at those government agents who may actually invade an individual's constitutionally protected privacy. The courts are not subject to any direct constitutional duty to exclude illegally obtained evidence, because the question of the admissibility of such evidence is not addressed by the Amendment. This view of the scope of the Amendment relegates the judiciary to the periphery. Because the only constitutionally cognizable injury has already been "fully accomplished" by the police by the time a case comes before the courts, the Constitution is not itself violated if the judge decides to admit the tainted evidence. Indeed, the most the judge can do is wring his hands and hope that perhaps by excluding such evidence he can deter future transgressions by the police. Such a reading appears plausible, because, as critics of the exclusionary rule never tire of repeating, the Fourth Amendment makes no express provision for the exclusion of evidence secured in violation of its commands. A short answer to this claim, of course, is that many of the Constitution's most vital imperatives are stated in general terms and the task of giving meaning of these precepts is therefore left to subsequent judicial decisionmaking in the context of concrete cases. The nature of our Constitution, as Chief Justice Marshall long ago explained, "requires that only its great outlines should be marked, its important objects designated, and the minor ingredients which compose those objects be deduced from the nature of the objects themselves.". . .

A more direct answer may be supplied by recognizing that the Amendment, like other provisions of the Bill of Rights, restrains the power of the government as a whole; it does not specify only a particular agency and exempt all others. The judiciary is responsible, no less than the executive, for ensuring that constitutional rights are respected.…

The Amendment …must be read to condemn not only the initial unconstitutional invasion of privacy—which is done, after all, for the purpose of securing evidence—but also the subsequent use of any evidence so obtained.

The Court evades this principle by drawing an artificial line between the constitutional rights and responsibilities that are engaged by actions of the police and those that are engaged when a defendant appears before the courts. According to the Court, the substantive protections of the Fourth Amendment are wholly exhausted at the moment when police unlawfully invade an individual's privacy and thus no substantive force remains to those protections at the time of trial when the government seeks to use evidence obtained by the police.

I submit that such a crabbed reading of the Fourth Amendment casts aside the teaching of those Justices who first formulated the exclusionary rule, and rests ultimately on an impoverished understanding of judicial responsibility in our constitutional scheme. For my part, "[t]he right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures" comprises a personal right to exclude all evidence secured by means of unreasonable searches and seizures. The right to be free from the initial invasion of privacy and the right of exclusion are coordinate components of the central embracing right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures.…

Moreover, the good-faith exception will encourage police to provide only the bare minimum of information in future warrant applications. The police will now know that if they can secure a warrant, so long as the circumstances of its issuance are not "entirely unreasonable," …all police conduct pursuant to that warrant will be protected from further judicial review. The clear incentive that operated in the past to establish probable cause adequately because reviewing courts would examine the magistrate's judgment carefully …has now been so completely vitiated that the police need only show that it was not "entirely unreasonable" under the circumstances of a particular case for them to believe that the warrant they were issued was valid.… The long-run effect unquestionably will be to undermine the integrity of the warrant process.…

When the public, as it quite properly has done in the past as well as in the present, demands that those in government increase their efforts to combat crime, it is all too easy for those government officials to seek expedient solutions. In contrast to such costly and difficult measures as building more prisons, improving law enforcement methods, or hiring more prosecutors and judges to relieve the overburdened court systems in the country's metropolitan areas, the relaxation of Fourth Amendment standards seems a tempting, costless means of meeting the public's demand for better law enforcement. In the long run, however, we as a society pay a heavy price for such expediency, because as Justice Jackson observed, the rights guaranteed in the Fourth Amendment "are not mere second-class rights but belong in the catalog of indispensable freedoms." …Once lost, such rights are difficult to recover. There is hope, however, that in time this or some later Court will restore these precious freedoms to their rightful place as a primary protection for our citizens against overreaching officialdom.

I dissent.

Further Resources

BOOKS

Alderman, Ellen, and Caroline Kennedy. In Our Defense: The Bill of Rights in Action. New York: Morrow, 1991.

Greenhalgh, William W. The Fourth Amendment Handbook: A Chronological Survey of Supreme Court Decisions. Chicago: Criminal Justice Section, American Bar Association, 1995.

Hutchinson, Dennis J. The Man Who Once Was Whizzer White: A Portrait of Justice Byron R. White. New York: Free Press, 1998.

Levy, Leonard Williams. Origins of the Bill of Rights. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1999.

MacCoun, Robert J., and Peter Reuter. Drug War Heresies: Learning from Other Vices, Times, and Places. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2001.

Rosenkranz, E. Joshua, and Bernard Schwartz. Reason and Passion: Justice Brennan's Enduring Influence. New York: Norton, 1997.

Wetterer, Charles M. The Fourth Amendment: Search and Seizure. Springfield, N.J.: Enslow, 1998.

WEBSITES

Criminal Due Process. Available online at http://www.maxwell.syr.edu/plegal/Lessons/Dpr/dpr8.html; website home page: http://www.maxwell.syr.edu (accessed February 13, 2003).