Illustration of a bird perched on a scale of justice

To Kill a Mockingbird

by Harper Lee

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What are the similarities and differences between Boo Radley and Tom Robinson in To Kill a Mockingbird?

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The title of the book, "To Kill A Mockingbird," is obviously a reference to Boo Radley. However, it could also be related to Tom Robinson being killed by Bob Ewell and even to Atticus killing a mockingbird.

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There are several similarities between Tom Robinson and Arthur "Boo" Radley in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. Both characters are considered symbolic mockingbirds. They are both innocent, benevolent individuals, who are vulnerable and defenseless against their prejudiced community members. They are both soft-spoken, respectful community members, who do...

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not bother anyone. Both characters are also marginalized victims of discrimination. Tom Robinson is a victim of racial discrimination whileBoo Radley is discriminated because of his unorthodox, reclusive lifestyle. Both characters are also connected to the Finch family. Atticus is Tom Robinson's defense attorney and Boo Radley attempts to develop a friendship with Jem and Scout. Both characters are also involved in violent events. Tom Robinson is wrongfully accused of assaulting and raping Mayella Ewell while Boo Radley stabs and kills Bob Ewell during a struggle to save Jem and Scout's lives.

Despite their many similarities, both characters have dramatically different lives. Tom Robinson is a loving father and husband, who is respected throughout his community. Tom Robinson also has a positive reputation and is well-known by his neighbors. In contrast, Boo Radley is an outcast, who lives a lonely, solitary life inside his dilapidated home. Boo Radley also has a negative reputation and is the target of unflattering rumors. Tom Robinson is also physically handicapped while Boo Radley is not. Tom is also a black man while Boo Radley is described as being extremely pale and awkward.

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An interesting question.

Here are some similarities. Both are outcasts in their town. Both are the subject of much whispering and gossip. Both are objects of fascination for Scout and the rest of the town. Both serve as moral lessons for Scout; both are the targets for irrational fear. Both are arrested at some point in their lives, but both are essentially good.

The differences are marked. The most obvious is that Boo is white and Tom is black. As a result, Boo, while he is kept in the house, is protected from a lot of social fall out. Tom, by contrast, is punished far beyond any actual crime he's done, by society. He is eventually killed. Both are "mockingbirds" in the book's symbolism, but Boo is protected and not killed. (Tom, of course, is physically handicapped—one arm is crippled.)

Greg

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In To Kill a Mockingbird, compare and contrast the characters of Boo Radley and Tom Robinson.

Boo Radley and Tom Robinson are both characters who can be connected to the symbol of the mockingbird. Mockingbirds don't hurt or pester anyone, which is why Atticus says it's a sin to shoot one. The theme behind this is that innocent people are like mockingbirds, especially those who are less fortunate than the majority. These innocent people should be allowed to live in peace just like mockingbirds should not be shot. However, this is not the case for these two men. Both Radley and Robinson are hounded by rumors, myths, and prejudices; consequently, they are treated with disrespect from the community. For example, Miss Stephanie Crawford spreads rumors that Boo Radley sneaks around town at night and looks into people's windows. Rather than minding their own business, or finding out the truth for themselves, people judge Boo Radley as a criminal or a boogieman.

Tom Robinson also has rumors spread about him by Bob Ewell. It's worse for Tom, though, because Bob Ewell not only ruins Tom's life by claiming that he raped his daughter, but when Tom goes to jail his family suffers for the rumor as well. Neither one of these men deserves the disrespectful treatment that they attract from the people of Maycomb because they are innocent men who haven't hurt anyone.

The differences between Boo and Tom are the following: Boo is white and Tom is black; Boo stays in his house but Tom goes out to work each day; Boo doesn't have a wife and children, but Tom does. They both have disabilities, but Boo's is social and mental whereas Tom's is physical because his arm is crippled. Boo receives better treatment from the community because he is white and has white family to watch out for him. On the other hand, Tom suffers from racial prejudices that Boo never experiences.

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In To Kill a Mockingbird, compare and contrast the characters of Boo Radley and Tom Robinson.

Harper Lee wants to look at more than just one kind of prejudice in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird. That's why she created the characters of Tom Robinson and Boo Radley.

The most obvious example of prejudice is the racism that boils up around the Tom Robinson case. Robinson, as a black man in the South, faces the same racial hatred that black people have had to endure there for hundreds of years. Sometimes this racism results in physical tragedy, even death, as with Robinson. But always it subjects the people involved (both the haters and the hated) to a diminished capacity to live their lives in a fully meaningful way.

With Boo Radley, we also see prejudice, but it is of a different nature. This is the prejudice that people engage in with their neighbors and other folks who aren't necessarily all that different from them. Boo Radley, and the other Radleys, were culturally similar to Scout's family and the rest of the white people of Maycomb County. But since they kept to themselves and lived in what seemed a peculiar way, they were subjected to unfounded speculation and character aspersions that were unjustified. 

To Kill a Mockingbird doesn't ask readers to simply look at the cruel and unjust actions of others, which is all to easy to do; it also asks readers to consider their own potential unfair actions and judgments. Is there a Boo Radley in your neighborhood?

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In To Kill a Mockingbird, compare and contrast the characters of Boo Radley and Tom Robinson.

This is a good question. They are both innocent and kind. From a symbolic point of view, they are both mocking birds. This is to say that don't harm anyone and only do good. For example, Boo shows tremendous kindness towards Jem and Scout, and in the end he defends them from Bob Ewell. Tom, likewise, is kind towards Mayella. From this perspective they fit the definition that Ms. Maudie gives of mockingbirds: 

“Your father’s right,” she said. “Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don’t eat up people’s gardens, don’t nest in corncribs, they don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.”

They are also different. From the most basic point of view, one is black and the other is white. In book where the color of your skin matters, this is an important point. This is probably why Atticus was able to protect one and not the other. In this regard this book ends on a bittersweet note. 

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In To Kill a Mockingbird, compare and contrast the characters of Boo Radley and Tom Robinson.

Boo and Tom both share the distinction of being two of the adult, human "mockingbirds" in the novel. Both are harmless, innocent men who have been accused of terrible crimes which they did not commit. Public opinion deems them guilty nonetheless, and both men receive unjust punishment: Tom is found guilty of raping a white woman, and he is sent to prison to await his execution. Boo is guilty of a teenage prank, and he is sentenced to a life of confinement inside the family home by his father. Both of the men are damaged physically--Tom with his crippled arm and Boo from a lack of sunlight from being cooped up inside the Radley House--and emotionally: Tom attempts to escape from prison when he loses faith in white man's justice, and Boo eventually acquiesces to his family's sense of justice. Both men perform acts of kindness which are mistaken for evil: Tom attempts to help the friendless Mayella Ewell, who in turn accuses him of battery and rape. Boo leaves gifts in the knothole of the tree for Jem and Scout, but his brother, Nathan, seals the hiding place out of fear of Boo harming the children.

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In To Kill a Mockingbird, compare and contrast the characters of Boo Radley and Tom Robinson.

Comparisons:  They were both sentenced by authorities of the law (Boo by a judge to the boy's school, Tom to jail), both treated unfairly (Tom by almost everyone, Boo by his father and brother), both misunderstood and misjudged, both key factors in the events surrounding the ending of the novel and Bob Ewell's attack, both key factors in teaching Jem and Scout about decency, morals, justice and humanity, both kind-hearted (Tom did work for Mayella often, Boo helped the kids out and befriended them), both were defended by Atticus (Tom literally with the trial, Boo when Atticus tries to protect Boo's privacy from the kids).  Both of their innocent natures are symbolic of the mockingbird's song, and how it is a sin to shoot those birds.

Contrasts:  Tom ended up being killed by a brutal society whereas Boo was just shunned by it.  Tom actually received a sentence from a jury that was his punishment-along with society's racism, whereas Boo was a victim only of an overbearing and cruel father.  Tom lived a normal life and Boo was a recluse.

Those are just a few ideas to get you started.  Good luck!

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In To Kill a Mockingbird, compare and contrast the characters of Boo Radley and Tom Robinson.

Both Boo Radley and Tom Robinson are outsiders in Maycomb, albeit for different reasons. Tom, as an African American, occupies a lowly place in Southern society, reinforced by an apparatus of systemic legal and economic oppression. Prejudice determines his fate, finding him guilty of a crime he could not possibly have committed before he has even set foot inside the courtroom. And one of the biggest problems with prejudice is that it's stubbornly resistant to the facts. The prosecution has no case to speak of, and Atticus has all the relevant facts on his side. But so strong, so deeply ingrained is the level of racial prejudice in Maycomb that Tom cannot hope to get a fair trial, despite Atticus's best efforts.

Boo's identity has also been constructed out of prejudice, imposed upon him by the ignorance and lack of understanding of the townsfolk. Years of gossip, hearsay and idle talk has turned Boo into Maycomb's resident boogeyman. The less people know about him, the more they spin ever more elaborate tales concerning his allegedly demonic nature.

Again, as with Tom, the facts relating to his real self make no difference whatsoever to how he's generally perceived. It's only really Scout and Jem who gain a rare insight into the real Arthur Radley beneath the Boo of legend. Even after he has shown himself to be a much more complex, gentle character, it's hard to believe that the people of Maycomb will change their opinions of him. Maycomb's society is rigidly hierarchical, and such a society always has a need for outsiders. To acknowledge the existence of the real Arthur Radley would rob the townsfolk of their cherished right to judge people they don't understand and to keep them in their place.

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In To Kill a Mockingbird, compare and contrast the characters of Boo Radley and Tom Robinson.

On the surface, there are not many similarities between Boo Radley and Tom Robinson.  However, if you look closely, they are both symbolically compared to mockingbirds.  Atticus tells his children it is a sin to kill a mockingbird.  Mr. Underwood compares Tom Robinson’s death to the senseless killing of songbirds, and Scout compares Boo Radley to a mockingbird.  Each of these men is a victim of society in a different way.  Tom Robinson was targeted because of his race, and Boo Radley for his eccentricity. 

The story of Tom Robinson is more serious.  As an African-American, Tom Robinson was constantly victimized.  When Bob Ewell saw him with his daughter, he cried rape.  The story of a white woman and a black man could not be tolerated.  Robinson was convicted even though he was innocent, and Atticus proved during the trial that no crime was committed.  Tom Robinson had one useless arm and could not have caused Mayella Ewell's injuries. 

The worse part is that Tom Robinson committed suicide in prison.  Since he was crippled, he was shot attempting escape.  Even Mr. Underwood, the town's racist newspaperman, considered Robinson's death a travesty.

Mr. Underwood simply figured it was a sin to kill cripples, be they standing, sitting, or escaping. He likened Tom’s death to the senseless slaughter of songbirds by hunters and children ... (Ch. 25)

Tom Robinson never did anything bad to anybody.  All he did was try to help Mayella.  For his trouble, he was arrested, tried, convicted, and shot, all because of the color of his skin.

Boo Radley is the Finches' reclusive neighbor.  He never comes out of his house, and Dill and the other children decide that he is lonely and they need to make contact.  They try getting a glimpse of him or leaving him notes.  Atticus warns them to leave him alone.  He feels that Boo and his family deserves privacy.

The children make progress though.  They bring him out of his shell, and he actually starts leaving them gifts.  He puts presents in a tree hollow, mends Jem's pants and leaves them for him when he loses them, and puts a blanket on Scout's shoulders secretly during the fire.  His final gift is to rescue the children from Bob Ewell.  

Heck Tate told Atticus that he was not going to tell anyone what Boo Radley did, to save Boo from the notoriety and nosy neighbors.  When Atticus asked Scout, she agreed.

“Yes sir, I understand,” I reassured him. “Mr. Tate was right.”
Atticus disengaged himself and looked at me. “What do you mean?”
“Well, it’d be sort of like shootin‘ a mockingbird, wouldn’t it?” (Ch. 30)

Boo Radley was a mockingbird because he was a victim of society's cruelty.  The children saw something in him that no one else did, and became his only friends.  He repaid their friendship by saving their lives.

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In To Kill a Mockingbird, compare and contrast the characters of Boo Radley and Tom Robinson.

Great question! Tom Robinson is depicted in the novel as a well-meaning and polite black man whose kindness gets him into trouble when Mayella Ewell declares that he raped her. This only happens because he was trying to be kind as he recognised that way that she was left to look after the home without any support and gave her what help he could. When he is questioned, he makes the mistake of saying that he felt sorry for her, which antagonises the white men in the jury because a black man should not feel sorry for a white girl. The hypocrisy of the jury is shown by their decision to convict him as guilty of the crime of rape, which carries the death sentence, even though it is obvious he is innocent. Unfortunately, because he does not believe in the ability of "justice" to save him on appeal, Tom Robinson tries to escape and is shot dead.

Boo Radley is an interesting character because he leaves his mark on the novel even though he only appears at the very end. Legends and myths about Boo Radley abound, such as the way he wanders around at night and eats cats and other animals. He, like Tom Robinson, is something of a social outcast, but not because of his skin colour. He has spent a long time not going out of his house at all, as when he was a teenager a prank he carried out caused his father (now deceased) to put him under house arrest. Boo clearly dominates the imaginations of the children in the novel as they play games around his stories and dare each other to go up to the house. Boo is described as being in many ways similar to Tom Robinson. In spite of his treatment at the hands of his father, he is shown to be a loving and gentle individual who delights in acts of kindness, characterised by what he leaves for Scout and Jem in the hole of the tree. He plays a key role in rescuing the children at the end from Bob Ewell's attempted murder. What is interesting to note is that the fear that the children have of Boo Radley, which of course is based on complete ignorance rather than the facts, mirrors the prejudice of the town against Tom Robinson. Interestingly this connection is emphasised by the use of mockingbird imagery for both men.

So, when we think about these two characters, it is clear that although the central difference is their skin colour, there are many similarities concerning their position as outsiders or outcasts within their own society and the way that they are treated by their society.

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What comparison can be made about Boo Radley and Scout Finch? 

The biggest comparison between Boo Radley and Scout Finch has got to be that both of them are misunderstood and not accepted for who they are. For some reason, people believe the worst about each one of them. For example, Boo Radley is first depicted as an out-of-control youngster who must be locked away so he doesn't embarrass his father in chapter one. In much of the same way, Aunt Alexandra seems to think that Scout is out of control and needs to change so she won't embarrass the family name. 

"Aunt Alexandra was fanatical on the subject of my attire. I could not possibly hope to be a lady if I wore breeches. . . furthermore, I should be a ray of sunshine in my father's lonely life. . . but Aunty said that one had to behave like a sunbeam, that I was born good but had grown progressively worse every year" (81).

Another example is how Boo Radley reaches out to make friends with the kids by leaving gifts in the knothole of his tree; but Mr. Nathan Radley fills up the hole with cement and stops the practice. Likewise, Scout wants to invite a schoolmate, Walter Cunningham, to her house sometime and Aunt Alexandra says no "because he is trash" (225).

Boo Radley and Scout Finch are also prematurely judged on a specific incident that seems horrible at the time, but given an opportunity to explain, it would show a nobler reason for their behavior. For instance, Boo Radley stabbed his father in the leg with scissors and he is demonized for it around the community. If he had gotten an opportunity to explain himself, maybe he would have said it was in self-defense or in the name of something noble. The same thing happened to Scout at Christmas time when Francis called her father mean names. Scout punches him in the name of honor and her father, but Uncle Jack spanks and disciplines her without allowing her to defend her case first.

All of these instances show that Boo and Scout seem to have a lot in common. They are misjudged, mistreated at times, and misunderstood. They are probably the most genuine characters in the whole book, too, because they are never hypocritical. They might be misfits of sorts, but they are kindred spirits as well.

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Using quotes, compare Boo Radley and Tom Robinson.

In To Kill a Mockingbird, a mockingbird is a symbol for both Tom Robinson and Boo Radley. Both characters are similar in that they are innocent of what they are accused of in their community. A jury finds Tom guilty of raping a white woman although evidence strongly supports Tom's innocence. Boo is the subject of rumors and false accusations because he is misunderstood.

There are quotes in the book that support Tom's reputation as a kind and considerate man in his community. Tom makes the choice to help Mayella because he feels sorry for her. He says during his testimony, "Mr. Ewell didn’t seem to help her none, and neither did the chillun." At one point during the trial, Link Deas interrupts and declares, "That boy’s worked for me eight years an‘ I ain’t had a speck o’trouble outa him." Tom is found guilty because he is a black man. After Tom is shot and killed while trying to run, Mr. Underwood writes an editorial in which he compares the killing of Tom to the "senseless slaughter of songbirds by hunters and children." In racist Maycomb County, Scout realizes that, "Tom was a dead man the minute Mayella Ewell opened her mouth and screamed."

In the beginning of the novel, Boo Radley is portrayed as a scary monster responsible for various misfortunes and crimes in the community. Over time, the children begin to realize a different side of Boo. The reader sees Jem begin to expect that it is Boo leaving the gifts in the knothole of the tree. After Miss Maudie's house fire when Scout learns that Boo placed a blanket over her shoulders, Jem says, "I swear to God he ain’t ever harmed us, he ain’t ever hurt us." By the end of the novel, Scout sees Boo in a much different light. Scout feels that to let the community know about Boo's involvement in the death of Bob Ewell would be "sort of like shootin‘ a mockingbird." A quote that perhaps best represents how the children see Boo occurs when Scout says, "Boo’s children needed him."

Both Boo and Tom are unfairly judged by the community in which they live. Tom is seen in a negative way because of the color of his skin, and Boo is the subject of gossip because of his reclusive nature. Perhaps a difference between the two characters comes in how their stories end. Tom is shot and killed. His realization that the justice system will not work for him leads him to make the dangerous decision to run. Boo, in spite of his reclusive nature, makes the choice to save Scout and Jem. He places his own life in danger in the process. Boo, at least in the minds of some, receives a chance to be viewed differently while Tom does not.

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Using quotes, compare Boo Radley and Tom Robinson.

This is a great question. 

From one perspective, these characters come from two different worlds. Tom Robinson is a black man who is unjustly accused of a crime that he did not commit. Boo Radley is a white recluse that lives at home. 

From another perspective, they are very much alike.

First, Both have been treated poorly in life. Tom is wrongly accused, and eventually he is shot in prison. Boo grew up in an oppressive family. Miss Maudie says that Boo's dad was a foot-washing baptist, who thought all pleasure was wrong. Here is a quote:

“Foot-washers believe anything that’s pleasure is a sin. Did you know some of ‘em came out of the woods one Saturday and passed by this place and told me me and my flowers were going to hell?”

Second, Boo and Tom are fundamentally good people. From the beginning of the book, Boo only cared for the children. He left them gifts, put a blanket around Scout when it was cold, and protected them when Bob Ewell attacked. Likewise, Tom only did good things for the Mayella. Whenever Mayella needed chores done, he did them without charge. 

This is why Tom and Boo are mockingbirds. Scout comes to this point in a flash of insight, when she says that Boo is a mockingbird.

Atticus disengaged himself and looked at me. “What do you mean?” “Well, it’d be sort of like shootin‘ a mockingbird, wouldn’t it?”

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Using quotes from the novel, what are some similarities between Boo Radley and Tom Robinson?

There are many similarities between the characters Boo Radley and Tom Robinson throughout the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. Both characters display kindness and are selfless towards others throughout the novel. In Chapter 5, Miss Maudie describes Arthur Radley as a kind boy, which surprises Scout, who thinks "Boo" is a violent person. Maudie tells Scout,

"that is a sad house. I remember Arthur Radley when he was a boy. He always spoke nicely to me, no matter what folks said he did. Spoke as nicely as he knew how." (Lee 61)

Mr. Link Deas stands up for Tom Robinson during the trial similar to how Miss Maudie defends Boo's character. He testifies from the crowd that Tom is a kind, obedient individual. He says,

"I just want the whole lot of you to know one thing right now. That boy's worked for me eight years an' I ain't had a speck o'trouble outa him. Not a speck." (Lee 261)

Boo Radley and Tom Robinson are both helpful and giving characters throughout the novel. At the end of the novel, Scout says,

"Boo was our neighbor. He gave us two soap dolls, a broken watch and chain, a pair of good-luck pennies, and our lives." (Lee 373)

Tom Robinson is also giving and volunteers his time and services to Mayella Ewell. During Tom's cross-examination, Mr. Gilmer says,

"You're a mighty good fellow, it seems---did all this not for one penny?" (Lee 263)

Both characters have had run-ins with the law and have been in physical altercations with men brandishing knives. Atticus questions Tom regarding whether he has ever been incarcerated and Tom says,

"Got in a fight with another man, he tried to cut me." (Lee 225)

Tom received thirty days for disorderly conduct. Later on in the novel, Boo rescues Jem and Scout from Bob Ewell, who attacks them with a knife. Sheriff Tate never explicitly says that Boo murdered Bob Ewell, but he implies it.

Tom Robinson and Boo Radley are both innocent characters. Innocent characters are symbolized as mockingbirds throughout the novel because they cause no harm to anyone. Both characters are compared to mockingbirds at various times. Mr. Underwood writes in his new column about Tom Robinson's death. He says,

"He likened Tom's death to the senseless slaughter of songbirds by hunters and children, and Maycomb thought he was trying to write an editorial poetical enough to be reprinted in The Montgomery Advertiser." (Lee 323)

At the end of the novel when Atticus asks Scout if she understands why Sheriff Tate chose not to expose Boo Radley as the hero she says,

"Well, it'd be sort of like shootin' a mockingbird, wouldn't it?" (Lee 370)

Scout understands that Boo is a reclusive individual, and it would not benefit his well-being if he were forced into the spotlight.

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How are the Boo Radley & Tom Robinson episodes similar?

Boo, or Arthur, Radley and Tom Robinson are both presented as being victims of society - certainly society as it is represented by the town of Maycomb.  They are both seen to be different: Tom because of his colour and Arthur because of his reclusiveness, and in this kind of prejudice-ridden society, that makes them feared and despised, and more liable to be picked on. Both men are symbols of goodness, innocence and vulnerability in a divisive and sometimes violent society. In this way they are both likened to the mockingbird of the title, which functions as a symbol for innocence. Both men try to help others. However, Tom's efforts in trying to help Mayella ultimately cost him his life. Arthur similarly helps the children and eventually saves Scout and Jem by killing Ewell, but this time Atticus and Sherriff Tate refuse to let the whole business be dragged into the light and into the court, after seeing what happened to Tom. They will not let Arthur run the same risk by coming too much into contact with the insititutions and rules and prejudices of society. They realise that such innocence suffers when subjected to official scrutiny.

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What are some differences between Tom Robinson and Boo Radley in To Kill a Mockingbird?

At first glance, the characters of Tom Robinson and Boo Radley could not be more different. Other than the fact that they are both men who live in Maycomb, there are differences of race, class, occupation, and amount of presence in the novel. It is worth considering, however, some ways in which they are similar. Both men are the type of person Atticus would refer to as a “mockingbird:" an innocent or good person who should not be harmed.

Tom Robinson is a tall, well-built African American man who grew up poor. He had to work from an early age and severely injured one arm in an accident with a cotton gin. This injury limited his employment prospects and, in time of the novel, Tom had primarily been working as a handyman and picking up odd jobs, including one with Mayella Ewell—a young white woman. He becomes Atticus’s client after Mayella and her father accuse him of raping her. At one point, Jem, Scout, and Dill help Tom while helping Atticus to defend him against a mob of would-be lynchers outside the jail. Near the novel’s end, Tom is killed.

Arthur (better known as Boo) Radley is described very late in the novel. Until that point, he is a recluse who stays inside his house, and others rarely glimpse him. He is a white man who lives in a nice home in the Finch’s neighborhood; he does not work, apparently. When the children finally meet Boo, Scout describes him as very thin and very pale, with sickly white hands and almost colorless gray eyes. His whole aura changes, however, when he timidly smiles at Scout. Boo had apparently been kept inside by his father, and had been imprisoned as young adult for violently attacking him. In contrast to the children helping Tom, Boo helps to defend the children when Bob Ewell attacks them. At the novel’s end, Boo is alive and somewhat out of his shell. He stands on his porch, watching the children. He thinks of Scout and Jem Finch as “his children.”

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What are some differences between Tom Robinson and Boo Radley in To Kill a Mockingbird?

There are several notable differences between the characters of Tom Robinson and Boo Radley. Tom Robinson is an African-American who has a wife and children. Boo Radley is the Finch's reclusive neighbor who lives inside his house with his brother, Nathan Radley. Tom Robinson is well-known throughout the community and often helps Mayella Ewell with chores on his way to and from work. Boo Radley is unemployed and is rarely seen outside of his home. Tom Robinson has a crippled left arm, and Boo Radley does not appear to have any physical ailments. Tom Robinson is accused of raping and beating Mayella Ewell and appears in court. Boo Radley has never been accused of raping anyone and does not appear in court after he stabs and kills Bob Ewell. Boo Radley attempts to have a friendly relationship with Scout and Jem, while Tom Robinson is a relative stranger to the children. The majority of the black community supports Tom and his family, while the majority of the white community spreads rumors and views the Radleys with contempt. 

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What are the differences between Tom Robinson and Boo Radley in the story To Kill a Mockingbird?

This question has been asked before.  Check out the links below to find out more.  Thanks for using eNotes!

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