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Last Updated on July 29, 2019, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 484

1. How are trees harvested from forests? What logging methods are used in different terrains and different countries? Why have laws been passed in Canada and the United States to regulate the logging industry? How can the education of lumberjacks and logging companies contribute to the sustained harvesting of forests?...

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1. How are trees harvested from forests? What logging methods are used in different terrains and different countries? Why have laws been passed in Canada and the United States to regulate the logging industry? How can the education of lumberjacks and logging companies contribute to the sustained harvesting of forests? Can the methods used by Merv Wilkinson on Vancouver Island be applied in other places?

2. Find a nurse tree or a rotting log in a park or forest. What kinds of plants and animals can you find on it? Can you estimate how many of each? How long will it take for the nurse tree to decompose completely into soil? How can you tell where a nurse tree used to be before it became compost?

3. How do plants compete with other plant species? What are they competing for? List some examples of competition among plants. What use can humans make of plant competition? How do plants compete with farmers' crops?

4. List a number of introduced species imported into various parts of the world. How was each of these species moved and introduced? What was the immediate result? What was the result after a few years? What has been the long-term result? Have there been any benefits or problems for local species? What has been the human reaction?

5. What is air? How do we study the atmosphere? Was air always like it is today? What has happened to change air since life began? What changes have humans made to the atmosphere?

6. What risks do frogs and toads face? How do frogs and toads survive among predators and other threats? What happens to an area if all the toads and frogs are wiped out? What happens to an area when foreign toads and frogs are introduced, as when the cane toad was imported to Australia?

7. Are baby birds as helpless as they seem? What is a cuckoo? Why do most of the eggs in a nest hatch at about the same time even if they were not laid on the same day? How does a baby bird compete with other fledglings in the nest? What are some differences between domesticated birds and wild birds? What do migrating birds find in the Arctic tundra that makes it worthwhile to fly all that way to make their nests?

8. What are the worms that live in lawns in cities and towns? List the names and make sketches of the nematodes and annelids that can be easily found in your own area. Are these creatures harmful or helpful to the gardener? What role do they play in the local ecology? Should they be encouraged to live in our gardens, or discouraged? Why and how would a gardener do so?

9. What are some of the negative and positive aspects of forest fires? How are forest fires fought, and why? What are ecologists learning from the recent forest fire in Yellowstone National Park?

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