The Glass Castle Summary
by Jeannette Walls

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The Glass Castle Summary

The Glass Castle is a memoir by Jeannette Walls in which she recounts her unconventional and oftentimes transient childhood.

  • Jeannette's mother Rose Mary is an artist, and her father Rex is an alcoholic. The family is frequently forced to move in order to avoid creditors.
  • Rose Mary and Rex are neglectful parents, and Jeannette and her siblings often go days without food.
  • Despite these hardships, Jeannette excels in school and is accepted to Barnard College in New York. She eventually finds success in the publishing industry and gets married.
  • Rose Mary and Rex continue to choose to live as impoverished drifters.

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Synopsis

Despite her fears that no one would speak to her after she wrote her memoir The Glass Castle (2005), Jeannette Walls has since learned that she is very popular. Her memoir is a huge success, selling millions of copies all over the world. People and critics are truly fascinated with her story.

Jeannette and her three siblings were raised by parents no fiction writer could have ever made up. They all but starved their children; told them leaky roofs and bitter cold would make them strong; and then otherwise ignored them. The family was often on the move, escaping from creditors in the middle of the night in cars that sputtered down the road at no better than 35 miles per hour.  Each time they moved, the children were told they had to leave everything behind except for one special thing. With this, Jeannette packed away her favorite rock. It was the only item she carried with her from Arizona house to desert cabin to West Virginia shack.

The author grew up skinny and neglected, painting her skin with ink markers to camouflage the holes in her clothes. She went to school hungry and at lunch sat with her brother and read books. After lunch, they would search trashcans for discarded food. Jeannette's maternal grandmother sometimes came to their rescue, putting them up in her home and feeding them. But Jeannette's father, Rex, was a stubborn man who had trouble holding down a job, and when his mother-in-law called him worthless, he uprooted his family again. When the older woman died, Jeannette's mother, Rose Mary, inherited the house, which was filled with expensive furnishings. But Rose Mary refused to sell any of the goods even when they went days unable to afford food.  What money they did have, Rex tended to whittle away at bars, where he spent many of his days and nights.

Enthusiastic readers have consistently kept Walls's memoir on the best-seller lists and critics have praised her writing.  Prior to completing her memoir, Walls wrote a gossip column, so she knew how to tell a good story. She told her own story, critics have concluded, without over-analyzing her parents and without falling into the trap of begging for pity. Reviewers have found that Walls tells her story objectively and even manages to keep her sense of humor.

Summary

Jeannette Walls’s memoir The Glass Castle begins with Jeannette as an adult, living in New York City. As she rides in the back of a taxi, she notices what looks like a homeless woman on the sidewalk. When Jeannette turns to look back, she realizes that woman is her mother. Jeannette slips down lower in her seat, not wanting her mother to see her. She also admits that she does not want anyone else to know that that woman who is rummaging through the trash is her mother. Jeannette is ashamed of these feelings, and later she contacts her mother and plans a meeting. When she is face to face with her mother, Jeannette offers money, but her mother, Rose Mary, refuses it. Rose Mary insists that she is doing well and needs no assistance. It is at this point that Jeannette then relates the story of how she was raised, explaining her relationship with her mother and father, and how her mother ended up living on the street.

When she was three, Jeannette was burned seriously enough to require a skin graft. When doctors ask how the burn happened, Jeannette tells them that she was cooking...

(The entire section is 1,542 words.)