illustration of Kate and Petruchio standing and staring at one another

The Taming of the Shrew

by William Shakespeare
Start Free Trial

The Induction, Scene 2 Questions and Answers

Download PDF PDF Page Citation Cite Share Link Share

Last Updated on May 5, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 283

Study Questions
1. Where does Sly awaken?

See eNotes Ad-Free

Start your 48-hour free trial to get access to more than 30,000 additional guides and more than 350,000 Homework Help questions answered by our experts.

Get 48 Hours Free Access

2. How is Sly treated once he is awake?

3. How does Sly first respond to this treatment?

4. How does Sly describe himself?

5. What activities does the Lord suggest might be to Sly’s liking?

6. What classical text do the Lord and his servants allude to when they mention mythological characters, such as Adonis and Io?

7. How does the Lord ultimately convince Sly that he is a lord and not just dreaming?

Homework Help

Latest answer posted February 26, 2012, 2:21 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

8. Describe Sly’s reaction to his “wife.”

9. Does Bartholomew join Sly in bed?

10. What sort of play is announced to Sly?

Answers
1. Sly awakens in a bedroom at the Lord’s home.

2. The Lord’s servants treat Sly as a gentleman, and offer him wine and rich clothing.

3. At first, Sly tries to renounce his new identity and all the ministrations of the Lord’s servants.

4. Sly describes his ancestry, and his current vocation as a tinker (pot-mender), but does so in a pretentious way, as if he were a gentleman.

5. The Lord mentions riding, hunting, and hawking.

6. They refer to Ovid’s Metamorphoses, a text alluded to in various ways in most of Shakespeare’s works.

7. The Lord switches from talk of clothes and courtly activities, of which Sly is ignorant, to mention of Sly’s beautiful wife.

8. Sly is instantly attracted to Bartholomew dressed up as a woman.

9. No. Bartholomew cannot join Sly because that would lead to Sly finding out that his “wife” is nothing but a cross-dressed boy, and reveal the joke the Lord has played on him.

10. The play is at first described as a comedy, but on further questioning Bartholomew calls it a kind of history. The first description is accurate.

See eNotes Ad-Free

Start your 48-hour free trial to get access to more than 30,000 additional guides and more than 350,000 Homework Help questions answered by our experts.

Get 48 Hours Free Access
Previous

The Induction, Scene 1 Questions and Answers

Next

Act I, Scene 1 Questions and Answers