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A Tale of Two Cities

by Charles Dickens

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Key Events in A Tale of Two Cities

Summary:

Key events in A Tale of Two Cities include Dr. Manette’s release from prison, Charles Darnay’s trial and acquittal in England, the storming of the Bastille, the revelation of Darnay’s true identity, and Sydney Carton’s ultimate sacrifice. These events highlight themes of resurrection, sacrifice, and the tumultuous period of the French Revolution.

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How does chapter 5 of A Tale of Two Cities end?

Chapter 5 of A Tale of Two Cities, entitled "The Wine Shop," ends with Monsieur Defarge, the wine shop owner and ardent revolutionary, showing Mr. Lorry and Lucie Manette the sad, pathetic figure of Dr. Manette, Lucie's father. The good doctor has just been released from the stinking hell-hole of the notorious Bastille jail, where he was falsely imprisoned for eighteen long years. During that time, to avoid going out of his mind, Dr. Manette kept himself busy making shoes. And when M. Defarge opens the door to reveal Dr. Manette to Lucie and Mr. Lorry, he's beavering away at his last, making what he believes to be women's shoes in the latest fashion.

Before opening the door, Defarge tells Lucie and Mr. Lorry that he only shows Dr. Manette to people to whom the sight is likely to do good. Even though Dr. Manette is no longer in the Bastille, he was only released because the revolutionaries stormed the place. According to the law, he's still a convict and so Defarge figures that it's best to keep him safely hidden away from the prying eyes of the authorities.

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What is the climax of A Tale of Two Cities?

The climax of A Tale of Two Cities occurs during Darnay's trial, which takes place in a Paris courtroom. During the court proceedings, a letter written by Manette, while imprisoned for a long stretch of time in the fortress prison Bastille Saint-Antoine, is read aloud by Defarge. Manette’s letter is used to indict Darney as a born member of the French aristocracy, specifically the vile lineage of the Marquis St. Evremonde. In this momentous scene it becomes obvious to the reader that Madame Defarge’s impertinent hate toward Darnay will only cease when Darnay is executed by the state or Madame Defarge herself dies. The jury sentences Darnay to death, but during the falling action we see Carton execute a plan to save Darnay’s life at the cost of his own.

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What is the climax of A Tale of Two Cities?

I would say that the climax of this book is the point when Defarge reads the letter during Darnay's trial. The letter is one that Manette wrote. It shows that Darnay is related to the Marquis St. Evremonde, an aristocrat who was guilty of various crimes.

Once this has happened, the book moves into its falling action. In the falling action, we are going to find out what happens to Darnay once this information is revealed. We will find out what is going to happen with respect to his death sentence—will he die? If not, how will he be saved?

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What is the climax of A Tale of Two Cities?

The main turning point of The Tale of Two Cities is when Charles Darnay returns to Paris to be of assistance to his old servant, Gabelle, who is imprisoned by the revolutionaries for aiding an “emigrant” (meaning Darnay) who has been accused of treason to the people of France. Up to this point, Darnay had been living happily in London with his wife, Lucie Manette, and their daughter. While he had forsaken his estate and his title of marquis of Evremonde, he is arrested for being an emigrant, and thus a traitor to the people of France. This builds up the suspense in the last book of the novel, as Charles must fight for his life. Unbeknownst to him, it is Doctor Manette who unintentionally betrays him to the court of the revolutionaries and seals his death. At this point, Sydney Carton throws off his character of a drunk and becomes the hero by his self-sacrifice for Lucie.

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