Susanna Moodie Further Reading - Essay

Further Reading

(Nineteenth-Century Literary Criticism)

CRITICISM

Freiwald, Bina. “‘The tongue of woman’: The Language of the Self in Moodie's Roughing It in the Bush.” In Re(dis)covering Our Foremothers: Nineteenth-Century Canadian Women Writers, edited by Lorraine McMullen, pp. 155-72. Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press, 1990.

Highlights Moodie's role as maternal female narrator in the writing of Roughing It in the Bush.

Gerson, Carole. “Mrs. Moodie's Beloved Partner.” Canadian Literature 107 (winter 1985): 34-45.

Considers the role Moodie's husband, John Moodie, played in her life and works.

Lucas, Alec. “The Function of the Sketches in Susanna Moodie's Roughing It in the Bush.” In Re(dis)covering Our Foremothers: Nineteenth-Century Canadian Women Writers, edited by Lorraine McMullen, pp. 146-52. Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press, 1990.

Examines the autobiographical sketches in Roughing It in the Bush, arguing that they are an integral part of the text and should be considered as social history.

McCarthy, Dermot. “Ego in a Green Prison: Confession and Repression in Roughing It in the Bush.Wascana Review 14, no. 2 (fall 1979): 3-16.

Examines Roughing It in the Bush as a work of despair, focusing on Moodie's expression of disappointment and fear living in the backwoods of Canada.

Noonan, G. “Susanna and Her Critics: A Strategy of Fiction for Roughing It in the Bush.Studies in Canadian Literature 5 (fall 1980): 280-89.

Analyzes the interplay between Moodie as author and character in her novel.

Peterman, Michael. “Roughing It in the Bush as Autobiography.” In Reflections: Autobiography and Canadian Literature, edited by K. P. Stich, pp. 35-43. Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press, 1988.

Provides argument for Roughing It in the Bush as a telling autobiography.

Stratton, Florence. “Cartographic Lessons: Susanna Moodie's Roughing It in the Bush and Thomas King's Green Grass, Running Water.Canadian Literature 161-62 (summer-autumn 1999): 82-90.

Examines geographical discourse and concerns in Moodie's Roughing It in the Bush.

Thurston, John. “Rewriting Roughing It.” In Future Indicative: Literary Theory and Canadian Literature, edited by John Moss, pp. 195-204. Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press, 1987.

Considers the production and publication history of Roughing It in the Bush.

Additional coverage of Moodie's life and career is contained in the following source published by the Gale Group: Dictionary of Literary Biography, Vol. 99.