Who is the "dark lady" in Shakespeare's "My Mistress Eyes Are Nothing Like The Sun"? What are his notions towards love, and which of his works support this? Was he homosexual?

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There are scholars who believe that the dark lady could be one of three historical women: Mary Fitton, a lady in waiting to Queen Elizabeth; Lucy Morgan, a brothel owner and former maid to Queen Elizabeth; and Emilia Lanier, the mistress of Lord Hunsdon, patron of the arts. Some also consider William Davenant's mother to be the dark lady,... (Shakespeare-Online.com)

These are the speculated identities of the "dark lady" with recent evidence weighing in on the side of Lucy Morgan. These sonnets alone cannot be isolated to try to identify Shakespeare's ideas on love. It must be born in mind that, whichever woman the "dark lady" turns out to be, theirs was an uncomfortable romance. It was a romance of secret meetings and probable illegal circumstances, such as if the lady was married. The only question you can ask about Shakespeare's ideas about love in connection with the "dark lady" sonnets is: What was his idea about love in the midst of trying and unlovely circumstances with a woman who was possibly decaying in health and beauty (as a prostitute would be)?

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I always thought this was a beautiful poem.  The speaker is essentially recognizing all the hyperbole that usually takes place in poetry, where the young lovers profess how much more beautiful their girl is than anything else.  Shakespeare avoids this route on purpose, and delivers an honest and beautiful tribute.

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