Further Reading

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Last Updated on February 6, 2016, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 416

CRITICISM

Boos, Florence. “Morris's German Romances as Socialist History.” Victorian Studies 27, No. 3 (Spring 1984): 321-42.

Studies William Morris's “imaginative reconstructions of a proto-socialist past,” including The House of the Wolfings and The Roots of the Mountains—works that anticipate the ideal vision of Morris's News from Nowhere.

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(The entire section contains 416 words.)

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CRITICISM

Boos, Florence. “Morris's German Romances as Socialist History.” Victorian Studies 27, No. 3 (Spring 1984): 321-42.

Studies William Morris's “imaginative reconstructions of a proto-socialist past,” including The House of the Wolfings and The Roots of the Mountains—works that anticipate the ideal vision of Morris's News from Nowhere.

——— and William Boos. “News From Nowhere and Victorian Socialist-Feminism.” Nineteenth-Century Contexts 14, No. 1 (1990): 3-32.

Interprets News from Nowhereas “a high-point of Morris's projections of sexual equality.”

Britain, Ian. “A Transplanted Doll's House: Ibsenism, Feminism and Socialism in Late-Victorian and Edwardian England.” In Transformations in Modern European Drama, edited by Ian Donaldson, pp. 14-54. London: Macmillan, 1983.

Discusses the appeal of Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House to English socialists.

Goode, John. “Gissing, Morris, and English Socialism.” Victorian Studies XII, No. 2 (December 1968): 201-26.

Analyzes the contradictions in George Gissing's novel Demos: A Story of English Socialism, comparing the work to William Morris's News From Nowhere.

Gray, Alexander. The Socialist Tradition: Moses to Lenin. London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1946, 523 p.

Traces the socialist tradition from its ancient origins. In his preface, Gray acknowledges a fondness for the thought of Saint-Simon and Fourier, as well as his dislike of Marx.

Hapgood, Lynne. “Urban Utopias: Socialism, Religion and the City, 1880 to 1900.” In Cultural Politics at the Fin de Siècle, edited by Sally Ledger and Scott McCracken, pp. 184-201. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

Considers the mingling of political and theological discourse in the utopian fiction of the late nineteenth century.

Leatherbarrow, W. J. “Idealism and Utopian Socialism in Dostoyevsky's Gospodin Prokharchin and Slaboye serdtse.The Slavonic and East European Review 58, No. 4 (October 1980): 524-40.

Examines two of Dostoyevsky's early works of fiction written while he was largely under the intellectual influence of utopian socialism.

Nicholas, Brian. “Two Nineteenth-Century Utopias: The Influence of Renan's L’Avenir de la Science on Wilde's The Soul of Man Under Socialism.The Modern Language Review LIX (1964): 361-70.

Observes affinities in the utopian-socialist thought of Joseph Ernest Renan and Oscar Wilde.

Poore, Carol. “German-American Socialist Workers' Theatre, 1877-1900.” In Theatre for Working-Class Audiences in the United States, 1830-1980, edited by Bruce A. McConachie and Daniel Friedman, pp. 61-68. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1985.

Explores the socialist subculture among the German-American working-class of the late nineteenth century as it was represented on the stage.

Schmidt, Joachim. “The Issue of Youth Literature and Socialism.” Phaedrus (1981): 1-5.

Surveys the youth literature movement of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, designed by members of the Social Democratic Party in Germany and Austria to educate children with socialist ideas.

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Criticism: Socialist-Feminism