Slavenka Drakulic Further Reading - Essay

Further Reading

(Contemporary Literary Criticism)

CRITICISM

Banac, Ivo. “Misreading the Balkans.” Foreign Policy 93 (winter 1993): 173-82.

Banac explores the change in Drakulic's writing between How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed and The Balkan Express.

Dobbs, Michael. “Profits and Loss.” Washington Post Book World (23 March 1997): 8.

Dobbs praises Drakulic as a social critic in Café Europa, although he finds faults with her prose style.

Dunlap, Lauren Glen. Review of How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed, by Slavenka Drakulic. Belles Lettres 8, no. 1 (fall 1992): 19.

Dunlap examines how Drakulic uses everyday objects to illuminate the political situation in Eastern Europe in How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed.

Omang, Joanne. “The Cost of Survival.” Washington Post Book World (19 March 2000): 9.

Omang discusses the major themes of S. and asserts that “Drakulic's purpose is unabashedly journalistic and educational.”

Phillips, Andrew. “Balkan Brutality.” Maclean's 106, no. 29 (19 July 1993): 45, 47.

Phillips evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the essays in The Balkan Express.

Rocawich, Linda. Review of How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed, by Slavenka Drakulic. Progressive 56, no. 12 (December 1992): 38-9.

Rocawich discusses How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed in light of the war which broke out in Croatia after its publication.

Additional coverage of Drakulic's life and career is contained in the following sources published by the Gale Group: Contemporary Authors, Vol. 144; Contemporary Authors New Revision Series, Vol. 92; and Literature Resource Center.