Simon Schama Further Reading

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Further Reading

(Contemporary Literary Criticism)

CRITICISM

Adams, Julia, and Ann Stoler. Review of The Embarrassment of Riches, by Simon Schama. Contemporary Sociology 17, No. 6 (November 1988): 760–62.

Adams and Stoler offer a positive assessment of The Embarrassment of Riches.

Barrell, John. “The Argument from Design.” London Review of Books (24 August 1995): 21.

Barrel offers a mixed assessment of Landscape and Memory, in which he praises Schama's entertaining and erudite narrative, but finds fault in his expansive approach and tendency to overwrite.

Brown, Jonathan. “High Point in Low Countries.” New York Review of Books (21 January 1988): 11–12, 14.

Brown offers a positive assessment of The Embarrassment of Riches, commending Schama's lavish visual imagery.

Burke, Peter. “A Delicious Satisfaction with the Material World.” London Review of Books (12 November 1987): 13–14.

Burke offers a mixed assessment of The Embarrassment of Riches, in which he commends Schama's engaging narrative, but finds shortcomings in his “impressionistic” approach.

Colley, Linda. “Fabrication the Past.” Times Literary Supplement (14 June 1991): 5.

Colley offers a mixed assessment of Dead Certainties, criticizing Schama's reduction of historical scholarship to fiction.

“Not Yet Carlyle.” Economist (6 May 1995): 84–85.

The critic praises Schama's engaging personal perspective in Landscape and Memory, but finds shortcomings in the book's lack of organizing principles and structure.

Emsley, Clive. “Suspending Belief.” History Today 42 (September 1992): 48.

Emsley offers a mixed assessment of Dead Certainties, and expresses doubt as to the book's significance as a work of history.

Greisman, Harvey Clark. Review of Citizens, by Simon Schama. Contemporary Sociology 19, No. 2 (March 1990): 205–06.

Greisman praises Citizens as “an outstanding cultural history” despite shortcomings in its “overstated and at times melodramatic revisionism.”

Haley, K. H. D. Review of The Embarrassment of Riches, by Simon Schama. English Historical Review CIV, No. 412 (July 1989): 695–97.

Haley offers a generally positive assessment of The Embarrassment of Riches.

Halttunen, Karen. Review of Dead Certainties, by Simon Schama. Journal of American History 79, No. 2 (Spring 1992): 631.

Halttunen offers a positive assessment of Schama's prose style, research skills, and perspective on the subject matter of Dead Certainties.

Hutton, Patrick H. “Mnemonic Schemes in the New History of Memory.” History and Theory 36, No. 3 (October 1997): 378–91.

Hutton discusses the influence of metahistorical and postmodern theory on contemporary historiography and examines innovative approaches to historical writing in Schama's Landscape and Memory and Matt Matsuda's The Memory of the Modern.

Jones, Colin. “Down with the Bourgeoisie.” Times Literary Supplement (21–27 July 1989): 791–92.

Jones offers a mixed assessment of Citizens, commending Schama's insight and audacity, but faulting his distorted interpretation of the French Revolution's violent extremes.

Lovell, Margaretta M. Review of Landscape and Memory, by Simon Schama. William and Mary Quarterly LV, No. 1 (January 1998): 138–41.

Lovell praises Schama's synthesis of scholarship and narrative eloquence in Landscape and Memory, but expresses reservations at his portrayal of “exceptional men” as the principal creators of culture.

Masur, Louis P. “On Parkman's Trail.” William and Mary Quarterly XLIX, No. 1 (January 1992): 120–32.

Masur examines Schama's subjective historical perspective in Dead Certainties and his effort to reconcile problematic aspects of historical truth.

McNamee, Gregory. “This Lime Tree Bower.” Nation (22 May 1995): 727–78.

McNamee offers a positive assessment of Landscape and Memory, but concludes that the work falls short of its promise.

Otten, Anna. Review of Citizens, by Simon Schama. Antioch Review 48, No. 1 (Winter 1990): 113.

Otten offers a positive assessment of Citizens, complimenting Schama's usage of suspenseful prose.

Porch, Douglas. “Storm over the Bastille.” Washington Post Book World

(The entire section is 829 words.)