Themes and Meanings

Download PDF PDF Page Citation Cite Share Link Share

Last Updated on May 5, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 480

Serious Money lays bare the greed associated with the money-trading business and in the process bares as well the hypocrisies of both personal conduct and government policy. For an audience of the 1980’s, accustomed to being characterized by press and pulpit as rabid materialists, the point was clear: These characters...

(The entire section contains 480 words.)

See This Study Guide Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this study guide. You'll also get access to more than 30,000 additional guides and more than 350,000 Homework Help questions answered by our experts.

Get 48 Hours Free Access

Serious Money lays bare the greed associated with the money-trading business and in the process bares as well the hypocrisies of both personal conduct and government policy. For an audience of the 1980’s, accustomed to being characterized by press and pulpit as rabid materialists, the point was clear: These characters are reflections of those who first watched them.

Greed corrupts all. Scilla may begin her search for her brother’s murderer from the decent motive of family ties, but when she discovers that Jake was making enormous sums of money, without a qualm she switches to searching for the money instead. Driven by greed, all can justify their actions: Marylou and Jake can do insider trading because, after all, everyone acts on whatever information happens to come his way; Jacinta can double-cross even would-be lover Zac because a businesswoman is supposed to make as much money as possible; Jacinta and Marylou can deal in cocaine because the Central Intelligence Agency also benefits.

Personal greed is hardly a new evil, as the opening scene from The Volunteers makes clear. Caryl Churchill’s point is that the institutionalization of greed has reached alarming proportions. It is relatively harmless when greed lures some traders from BMWs to Lamborghinis. When it invades the boardroom, greed becomes corporate; corporate power is used to enrich the few. Corman’s takeovers create no new product or jobs, yet win or lose in the takeover attempts, Corman and his backers will be richer.

Corporate greed corrupts as readily as personal greed. Corman’s initial takeover plans are legitimate, but as he becomes desperate to complete the Albion takeover, he demands success by means fair or foul. Though Mrs. Etherington might try to negotiate the fine line between a legal “fan club” of supporters and an illegal “concert party,” Corman sneers, “It’s a concert party.” After mild protests, both she and Zac do just as Corman asks.

Greed and corruption permeate government as well. To win the election, the government schemes to stop Corman’s takeover. Worried not about Corman’s illegal practices but about how the public’s negative perception of the takeover attempt might cost them votes, the government threatens to intensify the DTI investigation if he persists and to call it off if he desists. Hence, keeping the image of respectability and legality becomes more important than being respectable and abiding by the law. The rich, a public relations expert explains, support museums, opera, and the theater not from love of art but from love of a respectable image.

Thus, though greed may begin as a personal evil, it and its accompanying corruption become a part of the fabric of business and government. The connection between personal and governmental greed and corruption is epitomized in the final song, as the traders toast the reelection of Margaret Thatcher with “oysters and champagne” and “mountains of cocaine.”

Illustration of PDF document

Download Serious Money Study Guide

Subscribe Now
Next

Characters