What are the differences and similarities between elements, compounds and mixtures?

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Atoms, elements, compounds, and mixtures are all forms of matter. Matter is defined as anything that has mass and volume.

Atoms, elements, and compounds are all pure substances. A pure substance is made of only one type of particle. This contrasts mixtures, which are made of more than one pure substances that do not chemically combine.

An atom is the smallest unit of matter. An element is simply a type of atom that has a specific number of protons. The periodic table is a chart that displays all of the different known elements.

Compounds are composed of more than one atom. The atoms of compounds are chemically bound via either ionic, covalent, or metallic bonds. Compounds consist of two or more atoms of different elements. 

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There are very few similarities between elements, compounds and mixtures. At the most basic level, all the three are composed of atoms. Elements and compounds are purely homogeneous substances and they have a constant composition throughout. Elements and compounds cannot be separated into their respective constituents by physical means. Compounds and mixtures are made up of different elements or different atoms.

There are a number of differences between the three types of substances. 

Elements are composed of only 1 type of atoms and any subdivision can only result in same element. All the atoms of an element have the same properties (assuming they are the same isotope). Some examples are iron, magnesium, gold, etc.

Compounds are composed of two or more elements in a fixed ratio. The properties of a compound are different from that of its individual constituents. A compound can be broken down into its constituents. Some examples of compounds are sodium chloride (common salt), water, etc.

A mixture is composed of two or more elements or compounds in a non-fixed ratio. All the constituents of a mixture retain their properties. A mixture can be divided into constituents by physical means. An example of a mixture is trail mix.

Hope this helps. 

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What is the difference between elements, compounds and mixtures in terms of particle theory?

We are looking at the difference between elements, compounds, and mixtures.  Elements are the purest form of a chemical substance and are composed of only one type of atom.  In other words, all of the atoms in an element will have the same number of protons.  Please note that a chemical composed of two or more of the same type of element (H2, O2, etc.) are also considered elemental forms as well.

A chemical compound is a chemical that is composed of at least two different types of elements.  These elements are combined together in fixed proportions and structures to produce a single type of unique particle.  Like an element, a compound is considered a pure substance (meaning there is only one type of particle in the substance).

A mixture is a combination of two or more different chemical compounds or elemental substances.  It is not a pure substance, but a combination multiple particles.  It can be separated into different type of particles.  There are two different types of mixtures, homogeneous and heterogeneous.  In heterogeneous mixtures, you can see the two different types of substances with your eye.  In homogeneous mixtures, you cannot see the two different substances (they appear as a single phase to the eye).

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What are the differences between elements, mixtures and compounds?

Let us start with elements.  Atoms from an element have a set amount of protons, a variable amount of neutrons, and a set amount of electrons.  Atoms of an element help define the physical and chemical properties of those elements.  The number of protons and electrons are what arrange the different elements into groups and families on the periodic table of elements.  Hydrogen, chlorine, helium, and gold are examples of elements.

Two or more elements that are chemically combined make up a compound.  These elements are chemically combined with each other by gaining, losing, or sharing electrons.  It is interesting to note the compounds physical and chemical properties are usually strikingly different from the elements that make them up.  A good example would be the formation of water from hydrogen and oxygen.  Hydrogen is very explosive when combusted with oxygen, and oxygen is what allows things to combust, or burn.  Together, they make a compound that puts fires out, water.

A mixture is combination of two or more elements that are physically combined, meaning they may be separated by ordinary physical means.  The mixture may not have strikingly different physical and chemical properties, as the individual components that make it up still retain their identities as substances.  This is like ordering a supreme pizza, then picking off the parts you don't like.

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What are the differences between elements, mixtures and compounds?

An element is a substance composed of only one type of atom and cannot be broken down into another type of matter. Examples can be found in the periodic table of elements--oxygen, nitrogen, iron are all examples of elements. A molecule consists of one or more atoms bonded together chemically which may include atoms of the same substance such as two nitrogen atoms or may include atoms of different substances such as in water--containing two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom per molecule of water. A compound simply describes two or more atoms of different elements bound together and cannot be broken down into a simpler type of matter by physical means. The properties of a compound differ from the individual elements contained within. For example, NaCl or table salt can be ingested and has certain properties. However, sodium reacts with moisture in the air very violently and chlorine is a gas. The individual elements in salt have different properties, then when they are combined to form the compound salt.

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What is the difference between compounds, molecules and mixtures?

In Chemistry, Matter can be classified as either a pure substance or a mixture. A pure substance is something that is homogeneous and has constant properties throughout. Under this classification, we have elements (building blocks, those you find in the periodic table; for example, neon, magnesium, etc), and then, you have your compounds which are elements chemically combined (for example, water - `H_2O` ; carbon dioxide, `CO_2` ). Mixtures, on the other hand, is a system made up of two or more different substances - note that they are mixed and not chemically combined.

Hence, compounds cannot be separated into their constituent elements using physical processes. On the other hand, mixtures, like sand and gravel or salt and water, can be separated by simple physical means (sand and gravel via filtration; salt and water via evaporation).

Lastly, molecules are an electrically neutral group of atoms held together by covalent bonds. Basically, molecules are the smallest particles of compounds that still retain the identity and properties of that compound. For example, water or  `H_2O` has molecules composed of two atoms of H and an atom of O. Mixtures, being a mixture of substances, can also be made of up molecules and/or atoms, depending on the substances involved.

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What is the difference between an element and a compound?

An element is only made out of one particular atom. If you were to look at the periodic table, every square is representing one element. So, sodium (Na) is just sodium. It is made up of only sodium atoms, which have special properties associated with them. That is the same with every element on the table. Every element is made of a special atom that is somewhat different than the atoms in all the rest of the elements on the table. They are arranged on the periodic table so that atoms with similar chemical properties are next to each other.

A compound, however, is when two or more elements are combined together to make a completely different substance. When sodium (Na) is combined with chlorine (Cl), it makes sodium chloride (NaCl). Sodium chloride behaves differently than both sodium and chlorine by themselves. Chlorine, for example, is a gas at room temperature. Sodium is a solid that is really soft, almost like cream cheese. When they combine, they make a crystal-like substance, which we know as salt.

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What is the difference between compound, mixture and element?

An element consists of exactly same atoms, that is, no atom can be distinguished from the other. This means that an element cannot be further divided and hence is a pure form of matter. An example of an element is oxygen. Two or more elements combine in a fixed ratio to form a compound. Hence, a compound has atoms of two or more different types and hence can be divided into individual fragments or other proportions. An example of a compound is water, which has hydrogen and oxygen in a 2:1 ratio. All the individual constituents of a compound lose out on their individual properties and hence a compound can have properties that are different from that of its constituents. A mixture is made up of two or more elements in any ratio. However, the difference between a mixture and compound is that the constituents can be easily differentiated in case of a mixture. An example is trail mix, from which we can pick out raisins, nuts, etc. easily. The individual components of a mixture retain their individual properties (for examples, raisins will still taste the same when in trail mix, etc.).

Hope this helps. 

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What are the main differences between elements, compounds, and mixtures?

A substance can be classified as either an element, compound or mixture. These three are markedly different from each other.

  • An element is the purest form of matter and consists of identical atoms. A compound is made up of 2 or more elements in a fixed ratio. A mixture is made up of 2 or more elements or compounds in a non-fixed ratio.
  • An element retains the properties of its constituents, that is, atoms. A compound does not retain the properties of its constituents and hence the constituents lose their properties. In the case of a mixture, all the constituents still retain their properties. 
  • An element cannot be broken down into its constituents by either physical or chemical means. The constituents of a compound can be separated by chemical means, while those of a mixture can be separated by physical means. 
  • Examples:
  1. Element: iron, hydrogen, carbon, etc.
  2. Compound: water, carbon dioxide, methane, etc.
  3. Mixture: trail-mix.

Hope this helps. 

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What are the differences between atoms, elements, and compounds?

A substance can be classified as either an element, a compound or as a mixture. An element is the purest form of matter and is composed of identical atoms (assuming no isotopes are there). Atoms are the smallest unit of matter that still retain their properties. A compound is made up of 2 or more elements in a certain fixed ratio. Thus, atoms form elements, and elements form compounds.

An atom retains the properties of a substance. An element retains the properties of its constituents, that is, atoms. A compound however, has properties that differ from its constituents. For example, water (chemical formula: H2O) is a compound and is made up of two elements- hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) in a fixed 2:1 ratio. Note that hydrogen contains atoms of hydrogen and oxygen contains atoms of oxygen. Now, hydrogen is combustible and oxygen aids combustion, however, their combination- water, is used for fire extinguishing.

Hope this helps. 

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