Sarah Orne Jewett

Start Free Trial

Discussion Topics

Download PDF PDF Page Citation Cite Share Link Share

Last Updated on May 6, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 114

How do Sarah Orne Jewett’s stories of country doctors confirm her experience of having often accompanied her father on his visits to patients?

Writing an essay?
Get a custom outline

Our Essay Lab can help you tackle any essay assignment within seconds, whether you’re studying Macbeth or the American Revolution. Try it today!

Start an Essay

What is the relationship between individual and community in Jewett’s fiction?

What are the outstanding characteristics of the old women in Jewett’s stories?

See eNotes Ad-Free

Start your 48-hour free trial to get access to more than 30,000 additional guides and more than 350,000 Homework Help questions answered by our experts.

Get 48 Hours Free Access

What qualities in Jewett’s writing did male critics of the time often fail to consider in their assessment of her work?

What does the narrator of The Country of the Pointed Firs learn from her sojourn at Dunnet Landing?

What do Jewett’s descriptions of the features of coastal Maine gain from her frequent technique of putting them into the mouths of her characters?

Other Literary Forms

Download PDF PDF Page Citation Cite Share Link Share

Last Updated on May 6, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 32

Sarah Orne Jewett wrote four novels, and she published popular books for children, including Play Days (1878) and Betty Leicester (1890). Her main work of nonfiction was a history, The Story of the Normans (1887).

Achievements

Download PDF PDF Page Citation Cite Share Link Share

Last Updated on May 6, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 152

Sarah Orne Jewett is best known as a local colorist who captured with fidelity the life of coastal Maine in the late nineteenth century in sensitive and moving portraits, mainly of women’s lives. Except for The Country of the Pointed Firs, widely considered her masterpiece, Jewett’s long fiction is thought less successful than her short stories. During her lifetime, she was considered one of the best short-story writers in America. Most of her stories appeared first in popular magazines such as The Atlantic, under the editorship of William Dean Howells, and Harper’s. American literary historian F. O. Matthiessen said in his 1929 study of Jewett that she and Emily Dickinson were the two best women writers America had produced. Willa Cather offered Jewett similar praise and credited her with positively changing the direction of her literary career in a brief but rich acquaintance near the end of Jewett’s life.

Other literary forms

Download PDF PDF Page Citation Cite Share Link Share

Last Updated on May 6, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 134

In addition to her novels, Sarah Orne Jewett (JEW-eht) wrote several collections of short stories and sketches, most of which were published initially in periodicals such as The Atlantic Monthly. The best known of these collections are Old Friends and New (1879), Country By-Ways (1881), A White Heron, and Other Stories (1886), and The King of Folly Island and Other People (1888). Jewett also wrote a series of children’s books, including Play Days: A Book of Stories for Children (1878), The Story of the Normans (1887), and Betty Leicester: A Story for Girls (1890). The posthumous Verses: Printed for Her Friends was published in 1916. Finally, Jewett was a voluminous writer of letters. Among the collections of her private correspondence are the Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911), edited by Annie Fields, and the Sarah Orne Jewett Letters (1956), edited by Richard Cary.

Achievements

Download PDF PDF Page Citation Cite Share Link Share

Last Updated on May 6, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 192

Sarah Orne Jewett is remembered as perhaps the most successful of the dozens of so-called local-color or regional writers who flourished in the United States from approximately 1870 to 1900. She is especially noted for her remarkable depictions of the farmers and fishermen of Maine coastal villages at the end of the nineteenth century. Although Jewett was writing from firsthand observation (she was born and reared in Maine), she was not one of the common folk of whom she wrote. Wealthy, articulate, and well-read, Jewett was an avid traveler who moved within prominent literary circles. Her sophistication imbued her best work with a polish and a degree of cosmopolitanism that renders it both readable and timeless; as a result, Jewett’s reputation has been preserved long after the names of most other regional writers have been forgotten.

Jewett is also regarded as something of a technical innovator. As modern critics of fiction attempt to establish specific criteria for novels and short stories, Jewett’s best work—notably her classic The Country of the Pointed Firs—is seen as straddling both fictional categories. As such, her work is of great interest to contemporary literary theorists.

Bibliography

Download PDF PDF Page Citation Cite Share Link Share

Last Updated on May 6, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 838

Auten, Janet Gebhart. “‘Nothing Much Happens in This Story’: Teaching Sarah Orne Jewett’s ‘A White Heron.’” In Short Stories in the Classroom, edited by Carole L. Hamilton and Peter Kratzke. Urbana, Ill.: National Council of Teachers of English, 1999. Recounts several experiences in teaching the story to high school students, making suggestions about the value of the story to exploring conflicts of interest and expanding the canon.

Blanchard, Paula. Sarah Orne Jewett: Her World and Her Work. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1994. Offers biographical information and critical interpretation of the works.

Cary, Richard. Sarah Orne Jewett. New York: Twayne, 1962. This critical study of Jewett includes a chronology, a biographical sketch, and descriptive analyses of most of her published works. Cary divides Jewett’s works into thematic groups and shows how Jewett is a product of her New England background. Supplemented by annotated bibliographies of Jewett’s books and of secondary sources.

Cary, Richard, ed. Appreciation of Sarah Orne Jewett: Twenty-nine Interpretive Essays. Waterville, Maine: Colby College Press, 1973. This book collects a good cross section of the major writing on Jewett from 1885 until 1972. Contains biographical sketches, extended reviews, examinations of her technique, interpretations of some individual works, and evaluations of her career.

Church, Joseph. Transcendent Daughters in Jewett’s “Country of the Pointed Firs.” Rutherford, N.J.: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1994. An excellent examination of Jewett’s novel. Includes bibliographical references and an index.

Donovan, Josephine. Sarah Orne Jewett. New York: Frederick Ungar, 1980. This critical study includes a chronology and an examination of Jewett’s literary career, following the development of her major themes through her works. Donovan is especially interested in Jewett’s feminist themes. She provides primary and secondary bibliographies.

Graham, Margaret Baker. “Visions of Time in The Country of the Pointed Firs.” Studies in Short Fiction 32 (Winter, 1995): 29-37. Discusses the concept of time in Jewett’s book from Julia Kristeva’s feminist perspective; argues that Jewett presents masculine, linear time and feminine, cyclical time, yet transcends both to achieve monumental time. Contends the narrator of the stories transcends the notion of superficial change and sees that the mythical and the historical are the same.

Howard, June, ed. New Essays on “The Country of the Pointed Firs.” Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 1994. Essays interpreting the novel. Provides bibliographical references.

Joseph, Philip. “Landed and Literary: Hamlin Garland, Sarah Orne Jewett, and the Production of Regional Literatures.” Studies in American Fiction 26 (Autumn, 1998): 147-170. Compares some of Garland’s early stories with the stories in Jewett’s The Country of the Pointed Firs to examine ideological conflict within literary regionalism. Argues that while Garland’s support for social reform leads him to challenge some of the conventions of late nineteenth century realism, Jewett does not see class differences as a hindrance to U.S. destiny.

Matthiessen, F. O. Sarah Orne Jewett. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1929. This short biographical study may be the most readily available in libraries. Matthiessen surveys Jewett’s life without going into great detail.

Mobley, Marilyn Sanders. Folk Roots and Mythic Wings in Sarah Orne Jewett and Toni Morrison. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1991. A critical study that asserts the importance of myth and folklore in the work of two women of different races and generations who draw on the cultural roots of their people.

Nagel, Gwen L., ed. Critical Essays on Sarah Orne Jewett. Boston: G. K. Hall, 1984. This collection includes sixteen contemporary reviews of Jewett’s books, reprints of eight critical essays from 1955 to 1983, and eight original essays. These deal with biography as well as interpretation. The introduction surveys the history of critical writing on Jewett.

Nagel, Gwen L., and James Nagel. Sarah Orne Jewett: A Reference Guide. Boston: G. K. Hall, 1978. Introduced with a survey of criticism on Jewett, this reference guide lists and annotates writing about Jewett from 1873 to 1976. It is invaluable as a source for secondary writing and for forming impressions of how Jewett’s reputation has developed. For discussions of criticism since 1976, see American Literary Scholarship: An Annual.

Roman, Margaret. Sarah Orne Jewett: Reconstructing Gender. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1992. A survey of Jewett’s life and art, focusing on her rejection of the limited role of woman in the nineteenth century. Argues that “The White Heron” presents doubts that men and women can join together and suggests hope for a symbolic androgyny instead. Argues that Jewett rejects male/female sexual categories in her fiction.

Sherman, Sarah Way. Sarah Orne Jewett: An American Persephone. Hanover, N.H.: University Press of New England, 1989. A full-length, in-depth study of Jewett that discusses the source of the mythic quality in her work. Sherman tells how Jewett came to terms with the culture that defined her womanhood, and sees the myth of Demeter and Persephone as a central symbol.

Silverthorne, Elizabeth. Sarah Orne Jewett: A Writer’s Life. Woodstock, N.Y.: Overlook Press, 1993. Silverthorne describes the increasing interest in Jewett’s treatment of women, ecology, and regional life. Silverthorne had access to letters and manuscripts unavailable to previous biographers, and she takes full advantage of Jewett scholarship.

See eNotes Ad-Free

Start your 48-hour free trial to get access to more than 30,000 additional guides and more than 350,000 Homework Help questions answered by our experts.

Get 48 Hours Free Access
Previous

Critical Essays