Sadakichi Hartmann Criticism - Essay

Current Opinion (essay date 1916)

(Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: "The Most 'Mysterious' Personality in American Letters," in Current Opinion, Vol. LXI, No. 2, August, 1916, pp. 124-25.

[In the following essay, the writer examines the public image Hartmann's life and personality fostered.]

The recent suggestion of Miss Amy Lowell, that no poet or writer ought to be paid for his or her literary work, but should earn a living in other kinds of work, would, if acted upon, deprive our poets especially of a picturesque and legendary quality that has added an undoubted glamor to much of their work. The modern young poet seems deficient in the power to create a legend about himself or is indifferent to its value. If he is going to...

(The entire section is 2013 words.)

Benjamin de Casseres (essay date 1926)

(Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: "Sadakichi Hartmann," in American Mercury, Vol. 9, No. 36, December, 1926, pp. 397-98.

[In the following essay, de Casseres provides a short sketch of Hartmann's exploits.]

A grotesque etched in flesh by the drunken Goya of Heaven. A grinning, obscene gargoyle on the Temple of American Letters. Superman-bum. Half God, half Hooligan; all artist. Anarch, sadist, satyr. A fusion of Jap and German, the ghastly experiment of an Occidental on the person of an Oriental. Sublime, ridiculous, impossible. A genius of the ateliers, picture studios, ginmills and East Side lobscouse restaurants. A dancing dervish, with graceful, Gargantuan feet and a mouth like the Cloaca...

(The entire section is 591 words.)

Kenneth Rexroth (essay date 1971)

(Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: A foreword to White Chrysanthemums: Literary Fragments and Pronouncements, by Sadakichi Hartmann, edited by George Knox and Harry Lawton, Herder and Herder, 1971, pp. vii-xi.

[In the following essay, Rexroth discusses Hartmann's stature among American intellectuals.]

Hardly a man is left alive who remembers those famous days and years when New York too had a belle époque, the years from the turn of the century to the United States' entry into the First War—Who remembers the magazine Mlle. New York, the Armory Show, parties at Bob Chanler's studio, or at Willy Pogany's, where the rich bloods went to meet artists' models and where Stanford White...

(The entire section is 1589 words.)

Harry Lawton and George Knox (essay date 1971)

(Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: An introduction to White Chrysanthemums: Literary Fragments and Pronouncements, by Sadakichi Hartmann, edited by George Knox and Harry Lawton, Herder and Herder, 1971, pp. xii-xxv.

[In the following essay, Lawton and Knox discuss Hartmann 's last years of alcoholism and destitution, as well as his overall importance as a writer, critic, and cultural personality.]

A grotesque etched in flesh by the drunken Goya of Heaven. A grinning, obscene gargoyle on the Temple of American letters. Superman-bum. Half God, half Hooligan, all artist. Anarch, sadist, satyr. A fusion of Jap and German, the ghastly experiment of an Occidental on the person of an...

(The entire section is 4596 words.)

Richard Tuerk (essay date 1973)

(Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: "Sadakichi Hartmann's 'How Poe Wrote the Raven': A Biochemical Explanation," in The Markham Review, Vol. 3, No. 5, February, 1973, pp. 81-85.

[In the following essay, Tuerk examines Hartmann's fascination with Poe's "The Raven" and reprints Hartmann's essay "How Poe Wrote The Raven."]

Since the publication of "The Philosophy of Composition" in Graham's Magazine (April 1846), in which Poe "explains" how he wrote "The Raven" (first published in 1845), critics have speculated about the genesis of what is probably his most famous poem. Poe's own explanation describes its composition as having followed a mathematical-like formula, running from "effect" to...

(The entire section is 2807 words.)

Harry W. Lawton and George Knox (essay date 1978)

(Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: An introduction to The Valiant Knights of Daguerre: Selected Critical Essays on Photography and Profiles of Photographic Pioneers, by Sadakichi Hartmann, edited by Harry W. Lawton and George Knox with Wistaria Hartmann Linton, University of California Press, 1978, pp. 1-34.

[In the following essay, Lawton and Knox provide an extensive survey of Hartmann's life, works, and enduring influence.]

He was admired; he was feared; he was detested. Among the pioneers of photographic criticism in America none exerted such direct personal influence on so many photographers as did Sadakichi Hartmann (1867-1944), the Japanese-German writer and critic. He began his career as...

(The entire section is 11252 words.)

Jane Calhoun Weaver (essay date 1991)

(Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: An introduction to Sadakichi Hartmann: Critical Modernist, edited by Jane Calhoun Weaver, University of California Press, 1991, pp. 1-44.

[In the following essay, Weaver discusses Hartmann's works on art, contending that he was one of the most important critics of the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries.]

Few writers were as important to the art of the United States at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth century as Sadakichi Hartmann (1867-1944). Although primarily remembered today for his contribution to the history of photography, Hartmann was above all a knowledgeable, perceptive critic of painting and sculpture whose brilliant...

(The entire section is 15848 words.)