How does Faulkner use Miss Emily's house as a setting and metaphor in "A Rose for Emily"?

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The Grierson home feels like a fossil, where time stands still, and where the growth and development of its inhabitants are stunted just as the house is. No one had seen the inside of the house for "at least ten years" before Miss Emily's death, just as the woman herself had become a recluse. The house

had once been white, decorated with cupolas and spires and scrolled balconies in the heavily lightsome style of the seventies [...].

It was, like Emily, once beautiful and admired. However, it has fallen into total disrepair and decay, just as Miss Emily has, too, lost her youth and loveliness, her figure, and, perhaps, even her sanity. In many senses, then, the house is actually a symbol, as it has both literal and figurative meanings: it is a literal house that actually exists in tangible reality, but it also stands in, figuratively, for the Old South and for Emily herself. The theme, that time moves on and those who refuse to move with it are left behind to become irrelevant, is apparent in both Faulkner's depiction of the Grierson home and the Grierson family.

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The crumbling, old Grierson house serves as a symbol for all of author William Faulkner's themes in "A Rose for Emily." Like Miss Emily, it symbolizes the Decline of the Old South.

... set on what had once been our most select street... only Miss Emily's house was left, lifting its stubborn and coquettish decay... an eyesore among eyesores.

It represents death--of the Old South and as a final resting place for Emily's loved ones: both Emily's father--she would not allow his body to be removed for several days following Mr. Grierson's death--and for Homer Barron and, later, Emily herself. The house serves as a place of isolation for Emily, who rarely is seen in public, and who prefers to live her life as she always has within the walls. Inside, time never changes, and Emily adapts to the stagnancy within. Like Emily, the house slowly is reduced from its 1870s grandeur into a "fallen monument," a reminder of the glorious past now nearly forgotten by the new generations who have come to dominate the town.

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How is Miss Emily's house used as a metaphor in William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily"? Discuss the ways in which Faulkner uses Miss Emily's house as an appropriate setting and as a metaphor for both her and the themes established by the narrative.

The house becomes the cloister that holds, protects and isolated Miss Emily. It can be seen as a metaphor for and extension of her will to maintain a preference for the past. As the other houses on the street are replaced by businesses, Miss Emily's house stubbornly remains. It is closed in by change, but, in its turn, closes out those changes which assault it. 

The house endures, persisting as if the world will not age, even while the house servant grows older and Emily does too. 

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How is Miss Emily's house used as a metaphor in William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily"? Discuss the ways in which Faulkner uses Miss Emily's house as an appropriate setting and as a metaphor for both her and the themes established by the narrative.

The house is a symbol of a time gone by, even as the neighborhood goes downhill. Emily has managed to live there with few questions asked, not even having to pay taxes or to account for where Homer vanished to, largely because parts of the community still adhere to these old codes of honor. As the judge tells one younger man, "Dammit, sir … will you accuse a lady to her face of smelling bad?" The genteel mores of older residents of the town allow Emily to keep her terrible secret. In this sense, the house might be a symbol of the South itself, which also hid terrible truths underneath an idealized veneer.

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How is Miss Emily's house used as a metaphor in William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily"? Discuss the ways in which Faulkner uses Miss Emily's house as an appropriate setting and as a metaphor for both her and the themes established by the narrative.

Miss Emily's house was representive of the Old Victorian style of the late 1870's with its fancy details and show of wealth, and that matches the status of her father and her in her younger days. It reinforces her characterization as someone who at one time had respect in the community. It is easy to picture a fine home that would seem to be the home of a person who is above reproach.

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How is Miss Emily's house used as a metaphor in William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily"? Discuss the ways in which Faulkner uses Miss Emily's house as an appropriate setting and as a metaphor for both her and the themes established by the narrative.

As Miss Emily was once young and beautiful, so, too was her house. As Miss Emily became old and refused to change with the times, so did her house remain the same as the rest of the neighborhood changed around it. And, as Miss Emily had many secrets of her own, the house also shared at least one with her as well.

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Describe and discuss the symbolism of Miss Emily's house in "A Rose for Emily."

Miss Emily's house is rich in symbolism, representing, among other things, the Old South, which is passing away, as well as the enclosed, hermetically sealed world in which Emily lived out her final years.

What's particularly notable about the Grierson residence from a symbolic standpoint is that it is in an advanced state of decay. It is difficult to avoid seeing this as a representation of the Old South, with its supposed gracefulness and charm and which is on the brink of dying out completely.

Once upon a time, this was an elegant building, a living monument to a society and a way of life that, with the passing of Miss Emily, is no more. Now that she's gone, the old house stands as a constant reminder as to how much life has changed in the small town of Jefferson and how stuck in the past Miss Emily was.

The decaying house stood isolated from the other buildings in town, just as the eccentric Miss Emily became isolated from the townsfolk of Jefferson. As the building decayed, so did she, both physically and mentally.

By the time she passed away, she'd become completely estranged from the town—in which she'd lived her whole life —and its inhabitants, who lived in a completely different world to this strange, eccentric old lady.

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In "A Rose for Emily," what are some ways Faulkner uses Emily's house as an appropriate setting and as a metaphor for both her and the themes established in the narrative?

Faulkner uses Emily's house as the objective correlative that reinforces the emotions he wants readers to feel toward Emily, namely curiosity, pity, and disgust. Throughout the story, the house remains as mysterious as Emily. Just as the house is usually closed up, with people from the town rarely allowed inside, so Emily remains closed to the townspeople, not maintaining any friends or confidants among the residents. The town takes some responsibility for the house, respects it, and is embarrassed for it--the same reactions they have toward its owner. Thus they allow the house to continue tax-free even as they send their daughters to Miss Emily with coins "as if for the collection plate" when she gives china painting lessons. Both the home and Emily represent the town's past; consequently people respect both it and her even as they feel embarrassed by the house (especially when it smells) and by Emily's odd ways. Nevertheless, both the townspeople and readers experience a level of disgust at the home and at Emily. The smell that requires treatment with lime, the dust, the acrid smell, the cracked furniture--all make the home creepy and uninviting. Emily herself evokes disgust: she was bloated, pallid, and "her eyes [were] lost in the fatty ridges of her face." The disgust toward the house and Emily reaches a crescendo at the end of the story when the decomposed body of Homer Barron is found on the bed and Emily's gray hair on the pillow next to it.

The house not only reinforces the emotions of the story, but it also symbolizes Emily in several ways. Several times Emily is observed framed by the windows of her house, making her a visual unit with the building. The house had been her father's, just as Emily was under her father's absolute control while he lived. The house is impenetrable for the most part, as was Emily herself. It is colorless, being described as dark and dusty, just as Emily is "iron gray." Both the home and Emily are a burden to the community and an embarrassment, especially when the house smells. Both Emily and the house are old and uninviting. Neither keeps up with the times; Emily won't allow the new postal numbers to be put on the house, keeping it in the past, and her room reveals that she tried to freeze in time her "wedding day" with Homer just as she had denied the progression of time when her father passed away. The upstairs bedroom symbolizes Emily's brain or psyche. No one had seen the room in forty years, just as no one had been allowed to access Emily's thoughts for four decades. Inside the room were the remains of Homer Barron and a hoped-for relationship--the same things that had no doubt filled Emily's brain for all those years. The deterioration and perversity within the room mirror the sickness of Emily's mind. 

Faulkner uses Emily Grierson's family home as an objective correlative in the story, reflecting the emotions of the townspeople and the reader, and uses it as a symbol of Emily. Using the house in this way reinforces the themes that a new generation can have an awkward relationship with odd, elderly citizens and that women who are dominated by their fathers can develop a disturbed love/hate relationship with men.

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