A Room of One's Own by Virginia Woolf

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Topics for Further Study

(Nonfiction Classics for Students)

Research Emmeline Pankhurst, the indefatigable British suffragette and feminist. What organizations and newspapers did she found or help found? What were their goals? What were her various strategies for achieving change? Write an essay that answers these questions.

The early twentieth century was a period of fervent women's rights demonstrations across the globe. Feminists in Russia, Japan, and Mexico, for example, were extremely active at this time. Research a feminist leader of a country other than the United States or Britain and write an overview of her life and work.

It is said that the rise of democracy in the eighteenth century and the Industrial Revolution in the nineteenth provided the combined impetus for feminist movements in Europe and the United States. Research how and why the Industrial Revolution led to changes in women's social status. Present your findings in a cause-and-effect diagram.

Examine the relationship between the abolitionist and feminist movements in the United States in the nineteenth century. Compare and contrast this to the relationship between the civil rights and feminist movements of the 1960s. Present your findings in a graphic organizer such as a Venn diagram.

Reread chapter three of Woolf s book. Then read Alice Walker's essay ‘‘In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens.’’ Write a paper explaining how Walker complicates or builds on Woolf s thinking. For example, consider how Walker's ideas about art and race contest Woolf s vision of what constitutes great art and what is necessary for such art to be produced.