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Romeo's impulsive and immature nature in "Romeo and Juliet."

Summary:

Romeo's impulsive and immature nature is evident through his hasty decisions and actions. He quickly falls in love with Juliet, marries her without considering the consequences, and reacts violently when provoked, as seen in his killing of Tybalt. These rash behaviors ultimately contribute to the tragic outcome of the play.

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In Romeo and Juliet, how is Romeo impulsive?

If only Romeo were not so impulsive, this story might have had a happy ending. From the very start, we see that the young Montague regularly acts and responds without thinking. He falls head over heels for Juliet the moment that he first lays eyes on her. He has no concern for the deadly feud between his family and the Capulets that make this love affair a dangerous endeavor. He even sneaks into the Capulet garden to spy on Juliet on her balcony without thinking about his own safety if he is caught or even considering whether or not Juliet would welcome such an intrusion.

His very brief engagement with Juliet also showcases Romeo's impulsive nature. They have just met, do not really know each other, and yet the two young lovers decide to get married in secret without truly considering the consequences of their actions.

Romeo shows his brash and thoughtless behavior when he duels with Tybalt. He started the scene determined to make peace with the irascible cousin of his bride. However, after his friend Mercutio is killed, Romeo quickly forgets about his mission of peace or the Prince's declaration against violence and kills Tybalt. He does not even consider how Juliet would feel about having her husband kill her cousin. If Romeo had just left it up to the Prince to punish Tybalt instead of doing it himself, Tybalt would have been banished instead of him.

Romeo's most fateful impulsive decision occurs when he receives news that Juliet is dead. Immediately, he makes plans to kill himself. However, if he had just waited a little bit longer before rushing back to Verona, he would have received word from the Friar that Juliet was not actually dead and it was just a ruse to reunite them.

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In Romeo and Juliet, how is Romeo impulsive?

Romeo is depicted as an impulsive, emotional teenager, whose mercurial personality creates many conflicts and puts him in several comprising situations throughout the play. Romeo demonstrates his impetuous nature by quickly forgetting about Rosaline the moment he lays eyes on Juliet. Prior to seeing Juliet, Romeo spent endless hours lamenting over Rosaline but instantly forgets about her in Juliet's presence. Romeo also makes the impulsive decision to marry Juliet shortly after meeting her. Even though Juliet is a Capulet and sworn enemy of Romeo's family, he decides to marry her without considering the circumstances or consequences of their doomed marriage.

Following his secret marriage, Romeo once again demonstrates his impetuous personality by immediately avenging Mercutio's death after Tybalt murders him. He fails to take into consideration the prince's decree against fighting in public and does not recognize how his actions will negatively affect his marriage. Once Romeo learns the prince has exercised mercy by sparing his life and exiling him from Verona, Romeo impulsively loses his composure and threatens suicide. He views being exiled as equivalent to death and cries on the floor of Friar Laurence's cell.

Another example of Romeo's impulsive nature takes place when he receives the news of Juliet's "death." He immediately entertains the idea of committing suicide instead of gathering further information and proceeds to visit an apothecary, where he purchases deadly poison. Once Romeo arrives at Juliet's tomb, he acts impulsively by fighting and killing Paris before committing suicide. Overall, Romeo's impetuous personality creates many conflicts and ultimately leads to his demise.

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In Romeo and Juliet, how is Romeo impulsive?

Romeo is endlessly the impulsive teenager, caught up in the intense whirlwind of whatever his emotions at the moment happen to be. He transfers his love from Rosaline to Juliet in a flash and scales a high orchard wall to seek out Juliet the same night he meets her—despite the risk of being killed if her male relatives find him there. Romeo agrees to marry her almost immediately, imprudently murders Tybalt out of passion, and quickly commits suicide when he thinks Juliet is dead rather than waiting a moment or seeking out more information. Being young, Romeo habitually acts first and thinks later. 

Friar Laurence tries to counsel Romeo to slow down and not allow his passion to burn at such a high intensity, telling him such a love will never last, but his words fall on deaf ears. Though the play locates the tragedy in the way innocent young people become the victims of a senseless feud, Romeo's headlong impetuosity arguably helps to propel the couple towards a bad end. 

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In Romeo and Juliet, how is Romeo impulsive?

Romeo appears to be very impulsive in love.  This love-at-first sight approach, given his age, isn't odd, however.  His switching his affections from Rosaline to Juliet, is certainly very speedy and impulsive, though.

He's impulsive in his decision to jump the Capulets' wall to avoid his friends, which puts him in his enemy's garden just under Juliet's balcony.  This impulsive act leads to their declarations of love and pledge to marry, an impulsive thing to do on the eve of meeting someone.

He's also impulsive in his engagement of Tybalt after Mercutio is killed.  He enters the scene determined to be a peace-maker, but lets his anger and grief get the best of him, and he murders Tybalt.  Once he realizes what he has done, he chides his own impulsiveness with the words, "I am fortune's fool."

He impulsively reacts to the "news" that Juliet is dead by flying to her side to kill himself.  He reacts before he can get word from the Friar that Juliet only pretends to be dead.

And,  finally, he impulsively kills Paris when he meets him in the Capulet tomb.  He simply kills him because he is in his way.

Overall, impulsiveness is a characteristic that defines Romeo's behavior throughout the events of the play.

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In Romeo and Juliet, how is Romeo impulsive?

It's important to consider Juliet's age when determining how to judge her impulsivity. Not even fourteen, she sometimes seems wise far beyond her years and at other times seems not quite capable of slowing down to rationally consider her decisions and their potential implications—a quality that is still attributed to typical teenage behavior hundreds of years after Juliet's character was created.

Whether you believe in love at first sight or not, the speed at which Juliet falls for Romeo is impulsive. It's especially rash considering the historical context for women at the time. Her father is already negotiating her marriage to Paris, and while Juliet isn't on board with this, women didn't really have a voice during this time period to speak out against the plans of men in their lives. By circumventing her father's plans, Juliet risks being disowned, which could leave her destitute.

She also kisses Romeo before she learns his name. This is quite risky for a woman, particularly of her social class, during this era. Women were expected to remain chaste and pure until marriage. If a man claimed otherwise, a woman could be doomed to remain single for her entire life, pushed to the fringes of society. It's pretty impulsive of Juliet to kiss a man she doesn't know at her father's party before knowing whether he is trustworthy and will protect her honor.

Many impulsive decisions follow, such as a fairly immediate proposal and its subsequent acceptance, but the one that pains me every single time I read or watch this play is Juliet's final decision. As she awakens in the tomb and finds Romeo dead beside her, she doesn't hesitate in taking her own life:

Yea, noise? Then I’ll be brief. O happy dagger,
This is thy sheath. There rust and let me die. (V.iii.189-190)

She's incredibly young, and to see this young life ended without any consideration for a different future is painful. Of course, this play is a tragedy, and the ending is foreshadowed from the Prologue. It thus has to end this way, but Juliet's impulsivity is certainly one of her character flaws that leads to her eventual demise.

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In Romeo and Juliet, how is Romeo impulsive?

I think it is fairly safe to say that many of the actions done by several characters in this play are impulsive. Juliet is equally guilty of doing and saying things that are quite impulsive. The first thing that comes to my mind is how quickly she goes from meeting Romeo to kissing Romeo. Romeo and Juliet say a combined 14 lines of dialogue to each other before their first kiss. I count that as impulsive behavior. She doesn't even know his name at this point. I also believe her marriage to Romeo is a good example of impulsive behavior. She kisses him after 14 lines of dialogue, and she marries him less than 24 hours after having met him. Capulet's party was Sunday night, and they are married on Monday afternoon.

If you are needing a specific line of dialogue that shows Juliet as acting or thinking impulsively, then I like one of Juliet's statements from Act 1, Scene 5. The line comes after Romeo and Juliet kiss, and Juliet asks the nurse to find out who he is. While the nurse is gone, Juliet says the following lines.

If he be married,
My grave is like to be my wedding bed.

She's essentially stating that if Romeo is married, then she'll never marry. It's Romeo for her or a long and lonely life. That's a fairly impulsive and overblown teenage statement. Another good quote comes in Act 2, Scene 2.

be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet.

The quote shows that she is ready and willing to abandon her family for Romeo despite the fact that she knows next to nothing about him.

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In Romeo and Juliet, how is Romeo impulsive?

Juliet is a headstrong young lady, incredibly feisty and full of spirit. Though she initially defers to her parents' wishes regarding her arranged marriage to Paris, she subsequently rebels, marrying Romeo in secret. Juliet's so impulsive that she cannot control her emotions; this is a characteristic she shares with Romeo. She falls madly in love with him the very first time she sets eyes on him, and from that moment on, nothing can change her mind; she wants to spend the rest of her life with Romeo and no one can convince her otherwise.

At the same time, we must acknowledge that Juliet is a product of her age and environment. She's still a young adult, emotionally immature and naive in the ways of the world. Yet that world itself, the world of Renaissance Verona, is one in which impulse plays a major part in people's lives. After all, this is a city where impulsive acts of violence take place in the streets on an almost daily basis. Emotional restraint isn't something one normally associates with the Veronese in Romeo and Juliet.

As with violence, so with love. Yet Juliet is ultimately undone by the prevailing double standard. While it's considered acceptable for young men to let off steam by engaging in acts of swordplay—within certain boundaries—it's considered highly improper for young women to follow their hearts, especially if it means defying the express wishes of their parents.

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In Romeo and Juliet, how is Romeo impulsive?

Well, clearly the speed with which Juliet "falls" for Romeo is indicative of a certain level of impulsiveness. Juliet is a young woman who knows her role and station and what is expected of her. She would have known that she would not have been able to choose who she could love and who she could marry. Daughters of upper class families in those times were expected to make alliances, not to marry for love. And yet, when she first sees Romeo in Act I scene v, she is impulsive in the speed in which she falls in love. Note what she says to her Nurse when inquiring about the identity of her mystery lover:

Go ask his name.--If he be married,

My grave is like to be my wedding bed.

Already, after this one meeting, Juliet is thinking in absolute terms. She is lot letting reason restrain her emotion and passion. In the same way, when she finds out the identity of Romeo, she says:

My only love, sprung from my only hate!

Note the absolute terms that Juliet uses here. Already, for a young girl who has probably never loved before, she refers to Romeo as her "only love" and seems to pledge herself only to him, without knowing hardly anything about his character apart from the fact that he kisses "by the book." She shows herself as incredibly impulsive and governed by emotions rather than by reason.

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In Romeo and Juliet, how is Romeo impulsive?

Like most Shakespearean characters, Lord Capulet is complex and very human. Early in the play, Lord Capulet appears to be a jovial, sensible father and husband, but as the story unfolds, it seems clear that he is prone to wild mood swings and impulsive behavior.

When Paris approaches him to ask permission (or at least discuss the possibility) to marry Juliet, Lord Capulet seems like a reasonable man. He tells Paris, "Let two more summers wither in their pride / Ere we may think her ripe to be a bride," and he suggests that Paris "woo" her because he believes Juliet should have a say in whom she marries. He's as protective of his daughter as any father would be.

Likewise, when Tybalt sees Romeo at the Capulet feast, he wants to kill him on the spot, but Lord Capulet counsels temperance and practicality. This act prevents a major Montague and Capulet confrontation and serves to keep the peace.

We begin to see over the course of the story, though, that when his authority is challenged in any way, Lord Capulet becomes childish and impulsive. Just hours after Romeo kills Tybalt, Lord Capulet is ready to marry Juliet to Paris almost immediately without considering any of the consequences for Juliet (among others). It seems clear from the text that his hatred for the Montagues leads him to rash and sometimes unjust decisions.

Another example: he becomes enraged when Juliet refuses to marry Paris, and some scholars believe that when he says, "My fingers itch," he is thinking of doing physical violence to Juliet. This contrasts sharply with the calm, temperate, loving father we see in the beginning.

As Shakespeare so often does, he strips away the artifice and allows us to witness the emergence of a character's true nature.

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In Romeo and Juliet, how is Romeo impulsive?

Impetuousness is an adjective to describe a sudden or rash action. A person who is so described therefore does not carefully consider the consequences of such an action. The action is impulsive and may result in dire consequences, as it is with Juliet.

Juliet is driven more by emotion than anything else. Firstly, her decision to conduct an affair with Romeo does not take into consideration the age-old feud between the two opposing families. She neither considers the dangers that she and her love are exposing themselves to in starting their affair. She also ignores all other sentiment or advice, as well as her parents' attempts in arranging a suitable marriage for her. She is driven solely by desire and thus loses all reason.

Secondly, her quick decision to marry Romeo is not accompanied by careful consideration. She decides on the spur of the moment to marry the object of her desire and does not care about what would happen afterwards. She has known Romeo for only a brief period, but tells him:

If that thy bent of love be honourable,
Thy purpose marriage, send me word to-morrow,
By one that I'll procure to come to thee,
Where and what time thou wilt perform the rite;
And all my fortunes at thy foot I'll lay
And follow thee my lord throughout the world.

In her address, she urges Romeo to arrange their marriage as soon as possible, vowing to lay her destiny in his hands. Her only requirement is that his love should be 'honourable.' She has not even had time to actually test the depth of Romeo's devotion or her commitment or to think of the implications such a decision involves and she is truly impulsive.

A further example of Juliet's hastiness is when she abruptly rejects her father's instruction to marry Paris. She tells her mother:

I pray you, tell my lord and father, madam,
I will not marry yet; and, when I do, I swear,
It shall be Romeo, whom you know I hate,
Rather than Paris. These are news indeed!

It is significant, though, that she does realize her mistake in being so terse and uses a different approach later. Her father had been overcome with anger about his daughter's disrespectful attitude and is clearly disgusted by her ungrateful response. Juliet later pleads:

Good father, I beseech you on my knees,
Hear me with patience but to speak a word.

The damage, however, has been done and Lord Capulet threatens to throw her out into the street and disown her.

Finally, accepting the well-meaning friar Laurence's advice on drinking the potion that would put her in a death-like sleep, is not well thought through either. Neither she, nor the friar, consider all the possibilities if things should go awry. They do not discuss all the possible outcomes, one being the possibility that the news about her supposed death may reach Romeo before his message. Tragically, this is exactly what happens. Romeo, believing that his beloved Juliet is dead when he reaches her inert and cold body in the chamber, commits suicide, and she later does the same on seeing his corpse.

Clearly, it is Juliet's impetuousness that has placed her in the perilous position that she eventually finds herself in. The tragically unfortunate outcome could have been avoided if there had been greater aforethought and consideration. 

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What quotes depict Romeo as impulsive and immature in Romeo and Juliet?

As he waits to marry Juliet, Romeo is jumping out of his skin with impatience for her to arrive, despite having met her fewer than 24 hours before. Friar Laurence chides him and tells him he will burn his love out far too quickly if he doesn't learn to calm down:

These violent delights have violent ends
And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
...
Therefore love moderately; long love doth so;
Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.

Friar Laurence advises Romeo to control his impulses or his love will end badly—an accurate foreshadowing of what is to come.

When the banished Romeo learns the false news that Juliet is dead, he never stops to question the truth of it but immediately and impulsively leaps into a plan to buy poison so he can commit suicide. He says, without a second thought:

Well, Juliet, I will lie with thee tonight.
Let’s see for means. O mischief, thou art swift
To enter in the thoughts of desperate men!
When he find the impoverished apothecary who he knows needs the money and will sell him poison even though it is illegal, he wants a poison that will kill him as quickly as a cannon fires:
will disperse itself through all the veins
That the life-weary taker may fall dead,
And that the trunk may be discharged of breath
As violently as hasty powder fired
Doth hurry from the fatal cannon’s womb.
Both love and pain have a violent immediacy for Romeo. He is a person who always wants to act right now and has no patience with waiting or contemplating what to do next. He goes in a flash from declaring his undying love for Rosalind to falling madly in love with Juliet—and in an instant, Rosalind is entirely forgotten. As soon as he falls in love with Juliet, Romeo wants to marry her. Even when this is arranged, he can hardly wait for the wedding to take place. Later, when he finds out Juliet has died, Romeo again acts impulsively in taking the poison—if he had sought out the friar or even waited before taking the poison, tragedy could have been averted, but that is not Romeo's way.
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What quotes depict Romeo as impulsive and immature in Romeo and Juliet?

When Romeo attempts to break up the fight between Mercutio and Tybalt, he accidentally inhibits Mercutio, allowing Tybalt to land the fatal blow. Romeo displays his impulsive nature throughout act three, scene one, when he reacts to Mercutio's murder by immediately fighting Tybalt. Following Mercutio's death, Romeo says:

"Alive in triumph—and Mercutio slain! Away to heaven, respective lenity,And fire-eyed fury be my conduct now. Now, Tybalt, take the “villain” back again That late thou gavest me, for Mercutio’s soul Is but a little way above our heads, Staying for thine to keep him company" (Shakespeare, 3.1.84-90).

Romeo then reacts impulsively by taking revenge and killing Tybalt. Instead of controlling his anger, Romeo makes a terrible decision, which gets him banished from Verona.

Later, in act three, Romeo displays his immaturity by complaining about his exile to Friar Lawrence. When Friar Lawrence tells Romeo that the Prince of Verona has lightened his sentence, Romeo reacts immaturely by saying,

"Ha, banishment! Be merciful, say “death,” For exile hath more terror in his look, Much more than death. Do not say “banishment" (Shakespeare, 3.3.12-14).

Romeo continues to complain that there is nowhere to go outside of Verona and that he would prefer death. Friar Lawrence responds by calling Romeo rude and ungrateful.

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What quotes depict Romeo as impulsive and immature in Romeo and Juliet?

One passage that portrays Romeo's immaturity can be found in the very first scene. When it is clear that Romeo is letting his heart be eaten away by his emotions for Rosaline, Benvolio begs him to listen to his advice and to forget about Rosaline. Romeo's response is, "O, teach me how I should forget to think!" (I.i.227). This line shows emotional immaturity due to the fact that it also portrays Romeo as being irrational. Only an irrational, immature person believes that he/she has no control over his/her own emotions. A wiser man, like Benvolio, would see that we can use our rational minds to control our emotional responses to situations.

Impulsiveness can be seen in Romeo's decision to  marry so suddenly, particularly when he begs Friar Laurence to marry he and Juliet that day, as we see in the line, "But this I pray, / That thou consent to marry us to-day" (II.iii.64-65). There was no real, concrete reason to want to be married so suddenly. Instead, had they postponed the marriage, Friar Laurence might have acted as an intermediary to try and persuade both Lords Capulet and Montague to consent to the marriage. Delaying the marriage until their plans were more publicly known and publicly accepted might have saved both Romeo's and Juliet's lives. 

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What quotes depict Romeo as impulsive and immature in Romeo and Juliet?

Romeo's predilection for impulsive, irrational behavior is perhaps the tragic flaw in his personality which, more than any other cause, is responsible for the tragic fate he meets at the end of the play. This impulsive behavior is demonstrated on many occasions.

For example, in act 2, scene 3, when Romeo insists on marrying Juliet only hours after having met her, Friar Laurence warns him against his hasty and impulsive decision and tells him that "they stumble that run fast." This quotation nicely encapsulates, in just five words, the fate to which Romeo succumbs. His impulsive behavior is the equivalent of him running too fast, and his death at the end of the play is, of course, the extreme equivalent of him stumbling because he is running too fast.

Later in the play, in act 2, scene 6, Friar Laurence again warns Romeo about acting too impulsively. He tells Romeo, "These violent delights have violent ends / And in their triumph die, like fire and powder." The "violent delights" that Friar Laurence refers to here are Romeo's impulsive actions, and the "violent ends" he predicts accurately foreshadow the death to which Romeo's impulsive behavior leads. In the second line of the quotation, Friar Laurence compares Romeo's impulsive behavior to "fire and powder." This comparison evokes an image of a trail of gunpowder leading inevitably to an explosion of fire. This again seems an apt analogy for Romeo's impulsive behavior. His impulsive behavior will lead to tragedy as surely as a trail of gunpowder will lead to an explosion.

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What quotes depict Romeo as impulsive and immature in Romeo and Juliet?

Romeo impulsively moves from being the courtly lover to becoming the impetuous, impulsive lover and fighter, and then the depressed lover.

Act I

Early in the play Romeo reacts emotionally to the news that his beloved Rosaline is going to a convent as he speaks dramatically in oxymorons: "O heavy lightness! serious vanity!" (1.1.168). But in a few scenes, he is excited again, and becomes instantly in love at his first sight of Juliet:

Oh, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!
It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
Like  a rich jewel in an Ehiop's ear--
Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear! (1.5.43-45)

After seeing Juliet at the Capulet masque, Romeo rushes toward her when he finds a chance to speak with her, recklessly disregarding the fact that she is of the opposing family: 

If I profane with my unworthiest hand
This holy shrine,... (1.5.87-88) 

and he even boldly asks to kiss her:

Then move not while my prayer's effect I take.
Thus from my lips by thine my sin is purged. (1.5. 102-103)

Act II

After his passionate meeting with Juliet, Romeo rushes in the night to be able to see her, and, perhaps, again speak with her. Risking death if the Capulet guards see him, he scales the wall of the orchard and stands beneath her balcony. And, when Juliet comes out and speaks about Romeo and his name being their only impediment, Romeo boldly and impetuously declares that he will gladly change his name for her:

I take thee at thy word.
Call me but love, and I'll be new baptized.
Henceforth I never will be Romeo. (2.2.50-51)

Then, after exchanging their vows of love for one another, Romeo rushes to Friar Lawrence to ask him to perform the marriage ceremony for Juliet and him. Although the priest warns Romeo about being so impulsive--"These violent delights have violent ends" (2.6.7)--he feels that marrying the two may help to end the feuding of the two families. So, after knowing each other for only hours, Romeo and Juliet are married.

Act III

When Romeo finds his friends Benvolio and Mercutio engaged in a heated exchange with Tybalt, he rushes to stop the aggression between Mercutio and Tybalt. Unfortunately, he rashly thinks that his words of good will can soothe Tybalt, even though Tybalt has no knowledge of any change having taken place in this Montague. Unfortunately, Mercutio is stabbed because Romeo impulsively steps in the way, preventing Mercutio's sword from defending him.
Rashly discarding his good will after Mercutio dies, Romeo attacks Tybalt, crying out: 

Away to Heaven, respective lenity,
And fire-eyed fury be my conduct now!
Now, Tybalt, take the "villain" back again (3.1.85-87)

In his frenzy, Romeo kills Tybalt, an impetuous act which causes his banishment from Verona. 

Act V

When Romeo is misinformed by Balthasar that Juliet is dead, he rushes to an apothecary, demanding poison. Because the apothecary is poor, he gives Romeo the poison he wants. Then, Romeo hurries to the Capulet catacombs. Shortly thereafter, he encounters Paris, "Wilt thou provoke me? Then have at thee"(5.3.70), and he kills the count.

Finally, when Romeo discovers Juliet and believes her dead, he does not think things through at all. For, even though he notices that her face does not have the appearance of death--"Why art thou yet so fair?"(5.3.111)--he does not hesitate before he decides to join her in death. 

Amidst the whirlwind of his emotions, Romeo acts impulsively, thinking himself driven at times by Fate. But, more than his being "Fortune's fool," in his rash decisions and actions, Romeo himself seems to work against his own well-being and good fortune.

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What are four quotes about impulsiveness in Romeo and Juliet?

When Sampson and Gregory, of the house of Capulet, first enter in Act 1, scene 1, Sampson tells Gregory, "I strike quickly, being moved" (1.1.5).  In other words, when he is made angry, he hits fast and hard.  Further, it isn't difficult for a member of the house of Montague to make him angry; therefore, he is somewhat rash and impulsive as far as the Montagues are concerned.

When first we see Paris speaking with Lord Capulet, he is quite anxious to convince Juliet's father to allow her to marry him right away.  When Capulet suggests that Paris wait another two years for her, Paris says, "Younger than she are happy mothers made" (1.2.13).  However, Juliet's father will not be swayed by Paris's attempts to persuade him, and he retorts that those who become mothers so young are often damaged by the experience.  Paris is disappointed that his impulsive desire to marry Juliet as soon as possible is rejected, for now, by her father.

Despite the fact that Romeo had been so loathe to attend the party at the Capulets' house because he was so upset over Rosaline, as soon as he sees Juliet, he asks, "Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight / For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night" (1.5.59-60).  In other words, he feels himself to be instantly in love with this girl he's never before seen, let alone spoken to. This is surely impulsive.

Then, when he and his friends are leaving, Romeo says to himself, "Can I go forward when my heart is here? / Turn back, dull earth, and find thy center out" (2.1.15-16).  He runs back into the Capulets' property to look for Juliet, scaling the wall around her garden and finding her up on her balcony.  Romeo's impulsivity in darting back into the Capulet estate—where he would be killed if he were found—is really dangerous for him, but it does not stop him, because he feels himself to be in love.

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What are four quotes about impulsiveness in Romeo and Juliet?

Friar Laurence speaks of his surprise at Romeo's impulsive switch, in the course of a night, from love of Rosaline to Juliet:

Holy St. Francis, what a change is here!/Is Rosaline, that thou didst love so dear/so soon forsaken?

Juliet expresses the impulsiveness of her rush to the altar through her impatience with her nurse, who is acting as a go-between. Juliet says of her: 

O, she is lame! Love's heralds should be thoughts,/ which ten times faster glide than the sun's beams

Shakespeare, enjoying the desperate adolescent desire to act impulsively and have everything now, continues to have fun with Juliet's sense of haste as she waits for her nurse:

But old folks, many feign as they were dead;/Unwieldly, slow, heavy and pale as lead./O God, she comes!

Friar Laurence chides Romeo on his impulsive haste to be married the day after he has just met Juliet:

These violent delights have violent ends

Although this play is a tragedy, Shakespeare wryly treats Romeo and Juliet's panting teenage passion for each other by playing up the comic vein. These two can hardly wait a minute! This is as much a play about adolescence, a time of lust, impulsiveness, impatience, and the agonies of the moment, as about the futility of a feud or the tragic consequences of doomed love.

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What are four quotes about impulsiveness in Romeo and Juliet?

Romeo and Juliet is filled with textual examples of Romeo and Juliet's impulsiveness.

1. "To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss" (I, v, 96). This line, spoken by Romeo, speaks to the impulsive nature of his love for Juliet. The line is spoken at their first true physical meeting and Romeo is already in love, deeply, with Juliet. This impulsiveness is compounded by the fact that Romeo has already forgotten Rosaline.

2.

I have no joy of this contract tonight:
It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden;
Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be
Ere one can say "It lightens" (II, ii, 117-120).

Here, while Juliet recognizes the impulsiveness of her love for Romeo ("too rash, too unadvised, too sudden"), it does not deter her from her love for Romeo. Instead, she later asks Romeo to consider marriage.

3. "Thy purpose marriage, send me word tomorrow" (II, ii, 144). Here, Juliet proves to be just as impulsive as Romeo. She is moved by his honorable love and immediately wishes to marry him. Therefore, she does not wish to wait long, or give Romeo time to really consider the proposal, to marry.

4. "Wisely and slow: they stumble that run fast" (II, iii, 94). This line is spoken by Friar Laurence to Romeo. Romeo is telling the friar that he must move, "stand on sudden haste" (which also speaks to impulsive behavior). The friar is warning Romeo that impulsiveness will lead to one's downfall and, therefore, speaks to the tragic nature of both the play and foreshadows the deaths of both Romeo and Juliet.

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What are three quotes that show how Juliet is impulsive in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet?

Given the fact that Romeo is from an opposing and feuding house, Montague, and Juliet is a Capulet, her initial draw to him flies in the face of her self-identity and self-interest and has no rhyme or reason other than impulse. Indeed, the love is so strong that Juliet cannot help but act on it in defiance of ramifications, beliefs, and values. This is clear when Juliet, having only just seen Romeo and learned of his background, declares:

My only love sprung from my only hate!
Too early seen unknown and known to late!
Prodigious birth of love it is to me
That I must love a loathed enemy! (I, v, 136-139)

Such is the power of this impulse—it makes her love whom she should rationally hate and seek whom she should practically avoid.

Being drawn to Romeo in defiance of reason in particular serves to highlight the impetuosity at the crux of her attraction. This conflict between impulse and reason is clearly played out in the following quote of Juliet:

I have no joy of this contract tonight:
It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden;
Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be
Ere one can say "It lightens." (II, ii, 117-120)

Moreover, here she realizes that her love for Romeo is as impetuous as the natural force of Nature that is lightning, for it can neither be controlled nor tempered by the intervention of mortal reason.

Lastly, Juliet betrays the full extent of this impulsive love's sway over her when she declares:

Be not so long to speak. I long to die
If what thou speak'st speak not of remedy. (IV, i, 66-67)

Thus she reveals that to not satisfy the impulse which has possession over her is worse than death. She at this juncture has a knife in her hand and expresses she would rather die than live without resolution to her romantic passion. As such, every fiber of her being, her very existence is overtaken by the overwhelming need to heed the impulsive love for Romeo.

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What are three quotes that show how Juliet is impulsive in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet?

After Romeo and Juliet meet, kiss, and speak briefly, Juliet asks her Nurse to find out what his name is. While the Nurse leaves her to ask, Juliet says,

If he be married,
My grave is like to be my wedding bed. (1.5.148-149)

In other words, she says that if the Nurse tells her that he is already married, then Juliet will never marry anyone, ever. Her wedding bed will actually be her grave. This is a pretty impulsive statement, as Juliet is only thirteen and she has only just met Romeo, and yet she is willing to make such a dramatic statement.

When the Nurse returns and tells Juliet that he is the son of her family's enemy, Juliet says,

My only love sprung from my only hate! (1.5.152)

Again, Juliet's impulsivity leads her to make a statement that implies she will never love another: Romeo will be her "only love," despite her youth and the very early stage of their relationship (if we can even call it a relationship at this point!). She believes herself to be utterly in love after having only exchanged a few words and kisses with a young man, and, moreover, she cannot imagine that she will ever love again.

Later, on her balcony, Juliet speaks to herself, believing that no one else is around to hear her. In part, she says, addressing her remarks to Romeo (who she does not realize is there),

[...] be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet. (2.2.38-39)

Here, again, after having only exchanged a few words and kisses, and despite her knowledge that loving Romeo would be totally unacceptable to her family, Juliet is ready to completely leave her family and join his. If he is willing to accept her love, she is impulsively ready, now, to give up her family and her life to join his.

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What are three quotes that show how Juliet is impulsive in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet?

Juliet is not an impulsive person until she meets and falls in love with Romeo.  Her first act of impulse is her decision to marry a boy she has only just met, in Act 2 Scene 2 (end of the balcony scene):

JULIET
Three words, dear Romeo, and good night indeed.
If that thy bent of love be honourable,
Thy purpose marriage, send me word tomorrow,
By one that I'll procure to come to thee,
Where and what time thou wilt perform the rite;
And all my fortunes at thy foot I'll lay
And follow thee my lord throughout the world.

The next impulsive move she makes is in Act 3 Scene 5, after Romeo has killed Tybalt.  Her father has promised her in marriage to Paris (within 3 days) and she resolves to get out of this with the help of the Friar or by killing herself:

JULIET
So many thousand times? Go, counsellor;
Thou and my bosom henceforth shall be twain.
I'll to the friar, to know his remedy;
If all else fail, myself have power to die.

Then, of course, finally, in Act 5 Scene 3, when she sees that Romeo has killed himself, she kills herself:

JULIET
Yea, noise? Then I'll be brief. O happy dagger!

[Snatching Romeo's dagger.]

This is thy sheath; [Stabs herself.] there rust, and let me die.

[Falls on Romeo's body, and dies.]

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What quotes depict Romeo as impulsive and immature in Romeo and Juliet?

Romeo's behavior throughout Romeo and Juliet is marked by impulsivity. At the beginning of the play, he is besotted with Rosaline, an unseen character, but quickly falls out of love with her after he glimpses Juliet. Their love affair and marriage are hasty, and Romeo continues to act impulsively.

At the end of the play, he has been exiled from Verona for killing Tybalt. In Act V, Balthasar brings him the (false) news that Juliet is dead, and Romeo immediately sets into motion plans to return to Verona. Balthasar does not know what Romeo's plans are, but he notices that Romeo is acting in an irrational way and says to him, "I do beseech you, sir, have patience./Your looks are pale and wild and do import/Some misadventure" (V.1.28-30). In other words, Balthasar sees that Romeo is becoming unhinged, and Balthasar begs (or "beseeches") him to be patient because Romeo seems to be heading towards trouble. Romeo answers, "Tush, thou art deceived. Leave me, and do the thing I bid thee do" (V.1.31-32). Romeo does not heed Balthasar and ignores any advice to slow down.

Romeo then goes to an apothecary, or druggist, to buy poison. The apothecary does not want to sell Romeo the poison he asks for and says, "Such mortal drugs I have, but Mantua’s law/Is death to any he that utters them" (V.1.70-71). Romeo answers him, "The world is not thy friend, nor the world’s law./The world affords no law to make thee rich./Then be not poor, but break it, and take this" (V.1.76-78). Romeo knows the apothecary is poor and plays on his poverty to convince him to sell Romeo the drugs that will kill him.

Had Romeo been less impulsive, he might have still been alive when Juliet woke up from the drug that she had taken. It is in part his heedless impulsivity that drives the action towards tragedy.

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Which quotes from Romeo and Juliet suggest Romeo's immaturity, not love for Juliet?

There are several quotes from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet that suggest Romeo perhaps was not in love with Juliet but was attracted by her beauty and, as an immature young boy of about 16, confused this attraction for love. One important story line that illustrates this point is that when the play opens, Romeo is “in love” with another girl, Rosaline. He is, in fact, so heart-sick over the unrequited love he feels for Rosaline that he mopes around and does not want to join his friends when they want to go out for the evening. When Benvolio asks him if he is mad, Romeo’s response is,

Not mad, but bound more than a mad-man is;
Shut up in prison, kept without my food,
Whipp'd and tormented and—God-den, good fellow.

We see that not only is Romeo moping over Rosaline, but he is a bit dramatic about it as well. Benvolio suggests that he and Romeo attend the Capulet’s feast that night, where Rosaline will also be. This way, he argues, he can point out to Romeo that there are many other girls who are prettier and livelier than Rosaline and Romeo might turn his attention to another girl and brighten his mood. Benvolio tells Romeo,

At this same ancient feast of Capulet's
Sups the fair Rosaline whom thou so lovest,
With all the admired beauties of Verona:
Go thither; and, with unattainted eye,
Compare her face with some that I shall show,
And I will make thee think thy swan a crow.

Romeo’s response to Benvolio is that his love is so strong, pure and undying that he compares it to a religious devotion. He says,

When the devout religion of mine eye
Maintains such falsehood, then turn tears to fires;
And these, who often drown'd could never die,
Transparent heretics, be burnt for liars!
One fairer than my love! the all-seeing sun
Ne'er saw her match since first the world begun.

Yet, when he sees Juliet at the feast, or party, he is immediately captivated by her beauty and believes that he has fallen in love with her. In the space of only a few moments, his religious devotion to Rosaline has been replaced by his religious devotion to Juliet. In fact, when Friar Laurence asks him why he stayed out all night and whether he spent the night with Rosaline, Romeo responds,

With Rosaline, my ghostly father? no;
I have forgot that name, and that name's woe.

What was before a devoted love has disappeared completely in his mind and he has forgotten Rosaline's name metaphorically and all the unhappiness that unrequited love caused him.

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Which quotes from Romeo and Juliet suggest Romeo's immaturity, not love for Juliet?

There is definitely a sense that Romeo is immature and infatuated rather than ready for a long-term relationship. The first issue is that he is fickle. The ease with which he abandons Rosaline on first seeing Juliet is evidence that he is impulsive rather than mature in his decisions. A quotation to support this is:

Is Rosaline, whom thou didst love so dear,

So soon forsaken? young men's love then lies

Not truly in their hearts, but in their eyes (Act I, Scene 3, lines 66-69).

Since Romeo has spent most of the first act expressing a deep passion for another woman, it's hard to believe that we should take his instant switch in his affections at the sight of Juliet very seriously. 

This quotation also supports the theory that Romeo seems to be mistaking lust for love. He is attracted mainly by outward appearances, as can be seen in his praise of Juliet's beauty:

The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars.

This does not seem like a solid basis for a lasting relationship. 

Romeo's romantic gesture of climbing over the wall is actually another sign of his immaturity. He risks his own death and dishonoring Juliet by doing this, but rather than thinking about the effect of his actions on Juliet or their families, he says,

And what love can do that dares love attempt;
Therefore thy kinsmen are no let to me.

This shows he is very self-centered, thinking only of immediate gratification of lust rather than about how his actions will affect the people around him.

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Which quotes from Romeo and Juliet suggest Romeo's immaturity, not love for Juliet?

One good quote that can be used to question the depth of Romeo's love can be found in Friar Laurence's reaction to Romeo's sudden change of heart. Friar Laurence accuses him of being fickle, saying,

Is Rosaline, whom thou didst love so dear,
So soon forsaken? young men's love then lies
Not truly in their hearts, but in their eyes. (I.iii.66-69)

In other words, Friar Laurence is saying that because of his youth, Romeo does not truly know what love is but instead mistakes love for lust.

Another good passage portraying that Romeo mistakes love for lust is spoken by Romeo himself. When Romeo first beholds Juliet at Capulet's feast, Romeo asks himself,

Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight!
For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night. (I.v.54-55)

In this passage, when Romeo asks if his "heart" loved, he replies by referring to his eyes, telling his eyes to "renounce," or give up, the idea that he knew love. Furthermore, Romeo's reference to beauty shows that he correlates love with only the acknowledgement of beauty. It can also be said that he is confusing love for lust. Hence, we see even through this passage that it is Romeo's youth that leads him to mistake love for lust, and prevents him from fully understanding the depth of love.

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How is Romeo's character impetuous in "Romeo and Juliet"?

Romeo's impetuosity can be seen in the astonishing ease with which he falls in love. It's a standing joke among his friends—especially Mercutio—who rib him mercilessly over it. It helps to explain why they find it so hard to accept Romeo's love for Juliet; they think she's just another brief infatuation like Rosaline.

But this time it's the real thing, as Romeo shows—somewhat ironically—by his impetuosity in the famous balcony scene. There's something about Romeo's impetuosity here that stands apart from previous instances. One certainly can't imagine him serenading Rosaline in this way. While Romeo is declaring his undying love for Juliet, using the most flowery romantic language imaginable, Juliet, though no less smitten, is much more grounded, trying to get Romeo to see the dangerous consequences of the two young love-birds going against the wishes of their warring families.

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How is Romeo's character impetuous in "Romeo and Juliet"?

I would say the height of Romeo's impetuousness is contained within act 5, scene 3, when he commits suicide. Juliet took a sleeping potion in order to fake her death and Romeo believes she is actually dead. He immediately goes to the apothecary to acquire poison, then returns to Juliet's tomb. Romeo kills himself in order to join Juliet in death. Romeo and Juliet have only known each other for a short time period. Their love progresses at a shocking pace and Romeo chooses to give up the entire rest of his life for Juliet. Juliet wakes up shortly after Romeo poisons himself, then stabs herself with a dagger. Had Romeo not acted so rashly, they would have both lived. Given this ending, Romeo's impetuousness is his tragic flaw and leads to his (and Juliet's) downfall.

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How is Romeo's character impetuous in "Romeo and Juliet"?

Romeo had to be characterized as unusually impetuous, even for a young man. Everything in the play has to happen within a limited time frame, and Romeo is the instigator. He sees and falls madly in love with Juliet in a matter of minutes--or seconds. He also forgets Rosaline within a short time. Then he arranges to be married to Juliet with the same impetuous haste. By Act III, Scene 5, they have already spent the night in each other's arms. Romeo's impetuosity seems infectious. It influences Juliet to marry Romeo without any engagement period and without her parents' knowledge, much less their consent. It also influences Friar Laurence to perform the wedding immediately and in secret. Perhaps Shakespeare decided to make Juliet such a young girl to make it plausible that she could be so easily swept away. A lot happens in Romeo and Juliet within a very short time frame. It seems as if they have lived out their whole lifetimes on "fast forward," so to speak.

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