How does Shakespeare present the character of Tybalt in Romeo and Juliet?

Juliet is a very self-willed character who is also very rash.

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Tybalt needed to act as a foil to all of the prudent and reasonable Capulets of the play.  He has no inclination for peace and spends much of his time baiting Montagues into battle which makes him a perfect match with the witty Mercutio.  What makes Tybalt so intriguing is his close relationship with Juliet.  Although they are cousins, it's important for us to understand that their relationship is much closer than what we consider "cousinly".  Juliet is devastated by the death of Tybalt, much like she would be if her brother had died.  It isn't until Juliet realizes that Tybalt would have killed Romeo that she begins to calm down about Tybalt's death.  The closeness of these two makes Tybalt actions and words seem even more savage when compared to the sweet and overly-loving nature of Juliet.  Shakespeare needed to show that this family rivalry continued to be strong in Verona, and it certainly wasn't people like Romeo or Juliet or Benvolio that made it stay strong.  It was the "loose cannon" characters like Tybalt that continued to fuel the fire.

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He does not speak many lines. Throughout the play, he demonstrates his angry, resentful, and stubborn nature. When Tybalt first appears, Benvolio is attempting to stop the servants of the Capulet and Montague households from fighting. By contrast, Tybalt urges on the fight and succeeds in drawing Benvolio in to fighting with him. In addition to his being belligerent and stubborn, Tybalt also has no qualms about fighting unfairly.

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What are Tybalt's character traits as they are presented in Romeo and Juliet?

When we first meet Tybalt at the Capulet's ball, he comes across as quite aggressive and vengeful. When he notices Romeo, who had gate-crashed the ball and is a sworn enemy of the Capulet's, being a Montague, he remarks:

This, by his voice, should be a Montague.Fetch me my rapier, boy. What dares the slaveCome hither, cover'd with an antic face,To fleer and scorn at our solemnity?Now, by the stock and honour of my kin,To strike him dead, I hold it not a sin.

It is clear from the extract that he has recognised Romeo from the manner in which he speaks. This shows that Tybalt also has a keen ear and is constantly aware of what goes on around him. It is as if he is paranoid about protecting the house of Capulet and in his overzealous loyalty would kill anyone from the opposition, in this instance, a Montague. He immediately calls for his sword, since he sees it as an insult that an enemy should have invaded and mocked the graciousness of their celebration. He vows to kill the insurgent as a matter of honor and duty to his family. He does not perceive such an act as evil.

In spite of the fact that his uncle, Lord Capulet, instructs him not to cause a scene and thus disrupt the party, Tybalt is stubbornly insistent , allowing his affirmed loyalty and...

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emotion to be dismissive of his uncle's entreaty. He responds:

It fits, when such a villain is a guest:I'll not endure him.

This indicates that Tybalt is stubborn and insistent, saying that Romeo's presence would have been excusable if he had been invited, but he was there without invitation and had to be dealt with.

It is only when his uncle imposes a threat and tells him to calm down, that Tybalt grudgingly accedes. He does however, grumble that it is a shame and that Romeo's intrusion will increase his resentment. Lord Capulet clearly knows that Tybalt is of a choleric disposition, meaning that he has a quick temper.

We also learn from Mercutio in his discussion with Benvolio, that he deems Tybalt to be quite a prima-donna, a playboy, fashionable, one who is keen on putting on airs. Mercutio seems to admire him, for he says that Tybalt is also tall and is a skilled swordsman. He resents the fact, however, that Tybalt and his like never seem to be satisfied and constantly change their style and manner. He resents the fact that he has to be regularly confronted by them, and sees them as pesky flies.

Later in the play we witness further evidence of Tybalt's hate, short temper and aggression. He actually sends Romeo a written challenge to a duel for having insulted the house of Capulet by surreptitiously attending a function to which he was not invited. When he confronts Romeo, we also learn that he is forthright and fearless, for he immediately challenges Romeo who rejects his challenge. This infuriates Mercutio who then takes up Tybalt's challenge. Mercutio is tragically killed because of Romeo's intervention which gives Tybalt a slight advantage which he then uses to fatally wound Mercutio.

Romeo later avenges Mercutio's death by killing Tybalt, an event that eventually leads to the tragic denouement of this dramatic tale.

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What are Tybalt's character traits as they are presented in Romeo and Juliet?

Tybalt is best known for his hot temper and aggressive personality. Tybalt is Juliet's cousin, who is extremely loyal to the Capulet name and is willing to defend his family's honor at all costs. In the opening scene of the play, Tybalt immediately establishes himself as an antagonist by challenging the peaceful Benvolio to a duel as he is attempting to break up a quarrel between the Montague and Capulet servants. Tybalt is also depicted as a skilled swordsman, who is both cocky and pugnacious. In act 1, scene 5, Tybalt demonstrates his loyalty and willingness to defend his family's name by attempting to fight Romeo after he overhears him talking at the Capulet ball. However, Lord Capulet prevents Tybalt from challenging Romeo and demands that he stand down and control himself. Tybalt becomes enraged and vows to avenge Romeo for trespassing at the ball and disrespecting his uncle. When Tybalt eventually gets his opportunity to fight Romeo, Mercutio intervenes and Tybalt accepts his challenge. Tybalt ends up killing Mercutio before he is slain by Romeo, which forces Romeo to flee Verona immediately. Overall, Tybalt is portrayed as a temperamental, honorable man, who is aggressive and extremely hostile.

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What are Tybalt's character traits as they are presented in Romeo and Juliet?

Tybalt, of course, is Juliet's cousin, which makes him the sworn enemy of Romeo, a Montague who is about his age. Tybalt is hot-headed and fiercely protective of his honor and that of the Capulet clan. He is constantly looking for a fight. We first see evidence of this in Scene I, when he enters the fray that is already occurring between some of his kinsmen and two Montagues. When Benvolio, a Montague, tells Tybalt that he is only trying to keep the peace, Tybalt sneers:

What, drawn, and talk of peace? I hate the wordAs I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.Have at thee, coward!

This quote summarizes Tybalt's personality fairly well. Later, when he recognizes a masked Romeo at Capulet's ball, he wants to kill him, and is only restrained by Capulet himself. His anger and quick-tempered nature are his undoing when he is killed by Romeo after fighting and killing Mercutio (with whom he protests that he has no quarrel) in the streets. Tybalt is the embodiment of the long-standing hatred and violence that existed between the two feuding houses.

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How does Shakespeare present the character of Juliet throughout the play?

The character of Juliet demonstrates several consistent qualities and shows some developments throughout the play. At the beginning of the play, Juliet seems to be a submissive daughter and claims that she will consent to whomever her parents choose for her to marry, as would be typical for the time period in which the play is set. However, once she meets Romeo, the son of the family with which her own family has a feud, and falls in love with him, she begins to consider her role and the ultimate dilemma that faces her.

While the time in which Romeo and Juliet fall in love seems very quick, Juliet's deep and mature thoughts about what she will have to give up in order to please either Romeo and herself or her parents span several scenes of the play and demonstrate her overall thoughtfulness as a character. Especially as a woman in the context of the play, her decision to marry Romeo without her parents' consent would have been a greater scandal than for Romeo; it shows a real bravery on Juliet's part, as she throws off several gender and familial roles in order to marry Romeo. Another thing that is clear from Juliet's contemplations is her dedication to Romeo, which is almost instantaneous upon meeting him. It remains firm all the way through to the end of the play when she commits suicide as an ultimate symbol of her love for him.

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How does Shakespeare present the character of Juliet throughout the play?

Throughout the play, Juliet is presented as level-headed, but headstrong. At the beginning of the play, the Nurse and Lady Capulet discuss the prospect of marriage with Juliet. Lady Capulet conducts this discussion in order to promote Paris as a suitor, and although she initially put off by this prospect, Juliet nevertheless listens to her mother and the Nurse, promising to consider Paris despite not being particularly fond of him. In this instance, Juliet proves herself to be thoughtful by her willingness to listen to her elders. Later, Juliet secretly marries Romeo. Juliet marries Romeo despite being fully aware of the possible consequences of her actions, and in this way, Juliet is very idealistic. This romantic idealism contrasts with Juliet’s level-headed pragmatism, and in order to reconcile these oppositions, Juliet stubbornly refuses to give up her love, regardless of consequence.

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How is Mercutio presented in Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet?

Mercutio is a character who is high-spirited, extremely witty, never at a loss for words, and the life of the party. He and Romeo are close friends, and Mercutio uses his wit to try to persuade Romeo out of the lovesick doldrums he is in over Rosaline.

Like Romeo, and unlike the steady and level-headed Benvolio, Mercutio is emotional (or mercurial, as his name suggests). He is not "in love with love" the way that Romeo is—in fact, he takes a much more cynical view of love—but he shares his friend's passionate intensity for life. Furthermore, when Romeo perks up after falling in love with Juliet, he and Mercutio can match each other in wordplay.

Mercutio loves a good fight and doesn't really believe that he could end up dying, which leads to his undoing when he fights with Tybalt.

Some critics have argued that Shakespeare had to kill Mercutio off, because his strong, vibrant personality threatened to overshadow the other characters in the play. Whether or not this is true, it is easy to see why Romeo is so upset over his friend's death.

Because he feels responsible for Mercutio's death, Romeo kills Tybalt, despite the fact that he has just married Juliet, who is Tybalt's cousin. Mercutio leaves a hole that will be difficult to fill—however, Romeo does not survive for long after his friend's death.

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How is Mercutio presented in Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet?

Mercuito is a very entertaining character. He is full of puns, ribald sexual allusions, and florid speeches like his famous "Queen Mab" speech. He is clever, witty and serves as a sort of foil for Romeo, who, at least before meeting Juliet, is morose and lovelorn. Mercutio mocks Romeo as he pines away for Rosaline, and it is clear that he is only really interested in physical love, not the kind of emotional, romantic love that characterizes Romeo. He is completely oblivious, as are most of the characters, to Romeo's love for Juliet. Mercutio is also impulsive and hot-blooded. When Tybalt comes searching for Romeo, Mercutio, despite having spoken at lengths about Tybalt's skill with a rapier, challenges him to a duel, deliberately provoking him when Tybalt tries to get out of it. And, of course, it is his death that leads Romeo to kill Tybalt. 

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How is Tybalt's character presented in Act I of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet?

The character Tybalt has a name that connotes energy as a bolt of lightning may, an energy that is uncontrolled.  And, the first part of his name,Ty-, also suggests the word tyro, which denotes one lacking in experience. These connotations do seem to apply to the personnage that the audience encounters in Act I of Romeo and Juliet. In fact, it is Tybalt who sets the tone for the motif of violence and the theme of the impulsiveness of youth with his impetuous actions in the first scene.  For, when Benvolio encounters him and declares that he wishes to keep the peace, the fiery and fiercely loyal Tybalt retorts,

What, drawn, and talk of peace? I hate the wordAs I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.Have at thee, coward! (1.1.65-67)

Later, in Scene 5, when Tybalt discovers Romeo at the masque in honor of Juliet on her birthday, he says,

Fetch me my rapier, boy. What, dares the slaveCome hither, cover'd with an antic face,To fleer and scorn at our solemnity?Now, by the stock and honour of my kin,To strike him dead I hold it not a sin. (1.5.57-61)

displaying again his bellicose and irrationally impulsive nature, a nature that is, of itself, destructive.  Impetuous and importunely violent, Tybalt's character portends the violent love that Romeo and Juliet themselves will experience.

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How does Shakespeare present conflict between Tybalt and Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet?

The conflict between Tybalt and Mercutio is not personal.  They fight because the Capulets and Montagues are fighting.

The feud between the Montagues and the Capulets has been going on for a long time.  In fact, it has been going on for so long that no one seems to know what started it.  When Mercutio and Tybalt get into a duel, they are fighting for honor.  As soon as they meet each other on the street, they start insulting each other and it is not long before it turns into a duel, even though fighting has been forbidden by the prince.

Tybalt is angry at Romeo.  He feels that he crashed the Capulet ball.  Tybalt calls Romeo a villain, but Romeo claims to love him.

TYB:

Boy, this shall not excuse the injuries

That thou hast done me; therefore turn and draw.

ROM:

I do protest I never injur'd thee,

But love thee better than thou canst devise (Act 3, Scene 1)

Mercutio stands up for Romeo because he is his friend and Romeo is clearly out of his element here.  Mercutio seems to be the better swordsman and is definitely witty.  Yet unfortunately Romeo panics and gets in the way.  Mercutio is stabbed under Romeo’s arm and dies.  Therefore Romeo accidentally causes Mercutio’s death in the middle of the fight between Tybalt and Mercutio.

Shakespeare demonstrates that the conflict between Tybalt and Mercutio grows out of the Montague-Capulet conflict.  Tybalt’s problem with Romeo really comes from his being a Montague.  Romeo really has no problem with Tybalt.  Mercutio doesn’t really like Tybalt much, calling him “ratcatcher” and “King of Cats” to demonstrate this.  He stands up for Romeo.  Tybalt kills Mercutio because he is fighting him instead of Romeo.  The conflict escalates too quickly because of both of their tempers and Romeo’s immaturity in refusing to acknowledge Tybalt and then getting in the way.

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How does Shakespeare present Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet?

Mercutio is famous for his puns and his very quick brain that is able to turn any conversation on its head through his jokes. His puns are not always in jest - sometimes they are in great bitterness, such as when he urges Romeo to call on him tomorrow to find him a "grave" man. However, it is important to identify the function of Mercutio and his dialogue. His speech serves to expose the self-love and romantic sentiments of the play. He mocks everyone - Romeo for his self-absorption to love and Tybalt for his fashion. It is interesting to that while most characters die citing fate as responsible for their demises, Mercutio does not fall in to this category. He is not a character to be played with by external forces. He lays the cause of his death very firmly at the door of the two warring houses, as he closes with his immortal words: "A plague on both your houses."

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How does Shakespeare present Juliet in Romeo and Juliet?

When looking for how an author presents a character, like Juliet, what you are really looking for his how the author characterizes that character. Characterization refers to how the author presents the character as a person. You are looking for the traits of the character. There are a lot of different things you can look for to help you analyze for characterization, but specifically, you want to pick out what the character does, says, and even how other characters relate to that character, because all of these things can help you see what the character is like as a person. Below is a link to an article for more details on character analysis, but some things to look out for are if the character makes ethical decision, if she acts wisely or unwisely, what her motivations are, words the character frequently speaks, symbols frequently associated with the character, etc. (eNotes, "How to Write a Character Analysis").If we are analyzing Juliet's characterization, one thing we can notice about her is that she is very self-willed. While she is respectful to her parents, it's very evident that she cares very much about her own thoughts and wishes. For example, when asked what she thinks of marriage, Juliet very directly states, "It is an honour that I dream not of," meaning, she has no desire to get married (I.iii.70). Since she so very directly expresses her own opinion here, we see that she is self-willed. However, she is also very respectful to her mother in agreeing to pay attention to Paris and decide if she can "like of Paris' love" (100).Another thing we can see about Juliet's characterization is that she can be very rash. We especially see her rashness in her resolve to commit suicide should Friar Laurence fail to help her escape having to marry Paris. Friar Laurence's plan was to fake her death so that she can be secretly united with Romeo in Mantua. But Juliet had just been threatened to be disowned by her father should she refuse to marry Paris, so if she simply left home to be with Romeo, she would have nothing more to lose. Therefore, why go against all of the religious beliefs that earlier seemed to be so important to her by threatening to commit suicide should Friar Laurence fail to help her? Why not just ask Friar Laurence to help her get to Mantua without faking her death? Her decision of suicide shows us just how rash and impetuous her character is.

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