Willard M. Wallace

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Last Updated on June 7, 2022, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 137

"Rabbits and Redcoats" is Chapter Harrow's account of the part he and his friend Interest Wheelock play in Ethan Allen's capture of Fort Ticonderoga….

It is a simple, reasonably plausible tale, though only a fragment. The dialogue among the three boys rings true. Less convincing is the benign portrayal of...

(The entire section contains 137 words.)

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"Rabbits and Redcoats" is Chapter Harrow's account of the part he and his friend Interest Wheelock play in Ethan Allen's capture of Fort Ticonderoga….

It is a simple, reasonably plausible tale, though only a fragment. The dialogue among the three boys rings true. Less convincing is the benign portrayal of Ethan Allen and quite unconvincing is that of Benedict Arnold, who, in some sort of clairvoyant mood, is already looking forward to defeating General John Burgoyne two years later. It is regrettable that though writing for a younger group, Mr. Peck did not retain the more valid conception of these two characters as portrayed in his recent "Hang for Treason."

Willard M. Wallace, "Came the Revolution: 'Rabbits and Redcoats'," in The New York Times Book Review (© 1976 by The New York Times Company; reprinted by permission), May 2, 1976, p. 26.

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