person walking through a forest

The Road Not Taken

by Robert Frost

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In "The Road Not Taken," what does the traveler do at the road's fork?

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When faced with a fork in the road, the traveler "look[s] down one as far as [he] could / To where it bent in the undergrowth" (lines 4-5). First, he checks one road out, noting that he cannot see very far down its path. Then, he decides to "[take] the other, as just as fair,/ And having perhaps the better claim,/ Because it was grassy and wanted wear" (6-8). So, he takes the second of the two roads, sort of arbitrarily. It seemed a little nicer, perhaps, because it was grassy, but he notes that "the passing there/ Had worn them really about the same,/ And both that morning equally lay/ In leaves no step had trodden black" (9-12). In other words, the same number of people have traveled each road because they were "worn [...] about the same" and "equally lay" in leaves that had not been walked on that day. 

He does, say, however, that when he is older, reminiscing about his life, he is going to tell people that "[he] took the [road] less traveled by/ And that has made all the difference" (19-20). So, although he takes a road that has been no less traveled (because they are equally traveled), he is going to tell people that one was less traveled and that he chose that one. In other words, he is going to lie.  Why? Because we all want to believe that we make unique choices that ultimately have value and shape our lives and give them meaning and direction. In the end, Frost seems to be saying that there really aren't unique choices but it is human nature to say that we have made them anyway. 

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In "The Road Not Taken," what problem did the traveler face when two roads diverged in a yellow wood?

It is autumn and the woods are yellow. Two roads diverged and the traveler had to decide which road to take. The two roads represent the choices we make in life. Life is a journey, and the traveler is faced with two roads in a yellow wood. The yellow wood represents the autumn of the traveler's life. The traveler stood looking down one road, trying to decide which road to take.

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

The traveler has a choice to make. The traveler is so sorry he cannot take both roads. He stood for a long time before deciding which road to take. Then finally, the traveler took the road less traveled. He is a nonconformist. He took the road that would have less distractions. It was "grassy and wanted wear." Now, the traveler can only contemplate what the other road would have been like. But since "way leads on to way" the traveler doubts that he shall ever come back.

The traveler is still thinking about the road he did not take. He is wondering what would have happened had he taken the other road. The traveler can only sigh as he thinks about the other road. In the end, he thinks he made the right decision:

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference. 

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What decision did the traveler make in the woods, as the two roads "equally lay" before him in "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost?

The only real action that happens in Robert Frost's "The Road Not Taken" is a choice: the speaker of the poem is at a crossroads and must choose which path to take. It becomes clear that there is no bad choice, but he does have some sense of regret about the path he might have taken.
In terms of how they look, the two paths are quite similar. As he stands at the crossroads and looks down both paths, he at first seems to prefer one over the other; however, in the end he determines that one road is "just as fair" as the other and the people who have traveled these two roads "had worn them really about the same." On the morning he makes the choice between the two roads that "equally lay," he travels one and
...kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.
He knows, as we all do, that he will probably never come back to this place again to explore the road he did not choose. He is not angry or bitter, but he is is a realist and he knows his life will probably not lead him back here again.
The other stanzas are a discussion about the two roads and making a choice; the final stanza reveals how the speaker feels about the decision he made:
I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.
The speaker realizes, of course, that by traveling one path (following certain goals and dreams for his life), he necessarily gave up what might have been if he had made different choices. We all do this. For example, choosing one college to attend is great and necessary, but it eliminates everything that might have been at another college. Choosing one field of study to major in necessarily restricts the study of another subject area. Choices must be made, but even when both choices are acceptable and good, there is still a sense of wistfulness and/or regret. This is often expressed as "what if?"
In this poem we know the speaker had to be thinking this way about the choice he did not make, for the title is "The Road Not Taken" rather than "The Road I Took." 
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In "The Road Not Taken," how did the traveller choose between the two roads in the forest?

If we read this wonderful poem carefully, it is clear that the way that the speaker makes his decision between the two roads is that he opts to follow the road that loooks as if it was less travelled upon than the other. Note how this second road is described in the second stanza:

Then took the other, as just as fair,

And having perhaps the better claim,

Because it was grassy and wanted wear;

Though as for that the passing there

Had worn them really about the same.

Note how the road is described as being more "grassy" and how it "wanted wear," pointing towards the way that this road looked like it had not been used or travelled upon much. However, having said this, the third stanza suggests that both roads are pretty much the same, so the speaker opts for the road that, to his eye, looks less travelled, though we as readers could suggest that there is little to choose between them.

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How does the poet decide between roads in the poem "The Road Not Taken"?

"The Road Not Taken" is a poem commonly understood to be about a man who took the road less traveled in life and found this choice to be more rewarding. Many view the narrator as seeing two paths, one well-trodden and one dense and wild with growth. However, a close reading of this poem will show this to be incorrect.

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;
Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,
The earlier lines can be interpreted as suggesting there is a difference between the two paths, but the latter lines ("Though as for that the passing there / Had worn them really about the same") reveal this separation to be untrue. 

The Paris Review recently posted an article about the common misunderstanding of "The Road Not Taken." A quote is below:

Most readers consider “The Road Not Taken” to be a paean to triumphant self-assertion (“I took the one less traveled by”), but the literal meaning of the poem’s own lines seems completely at odds with this interpretation. The poem’s speaker tells us he “shall be telling,” at some point in the future, of how he took the road less traveled by, yet he has already admitted that the two paths “equally lay / In leaves” and “the passing there / Had worn them really about the same.” So the road he will later call less traveled is actually the road equally traveled. The two roads are interchangeable. - The Paris Review (link attached)

The poem can be read as a commentary on how people craft the narratives of their lives. People are prone to believe their choices in life were the preferable choices, but this is often just nostalgia. At the end of the poem, the narrator says the path he chose made all the difference, but this is self-confirming. 

Of course, as The Paris Review article articulates, poems are not arguments, but rather they are things to be interpreted. The narrator in this poem decided his path almost at random, but in retrospect he believed that his path was the preferable one. 

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