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Compare the New Testament theologies of Peter Stuhlmacheer and Frank Thielman, the different contexts in which they were written, their approaches to New Testament theology, and their contributions to a deeper understanding of the New Testament.

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Peter Stuhlmacher and Frank Thielman are both renowned theologians recognized for their contributions to the understanding of New Testament theology. However, their approaches and contexts differ, leading to unique insights into the New Testament.

Peter Stuhlmacher, a German theologian, and professor emeritus at the University of Tübingen, is known for his historical-critical approach to New Testament theology. His work is largely influenced by his European context and the German theological tradition, which places a strong emphasis on historical criticism. Stuhlmacher's theology is characterized by a strong commitment to the unity of the Old and New Testaments and a focus on the centrality of justification by faith.

In his two-volume work, "Biblical Theology of the New Testament," Stuhlmacher argues for a unified biblical theology that is rooted in the message of Jesus and the apostolic witness. He emphasizes the continuity between the Old and New Testaments and highlights the significance of the historical Jesus for understanding the New Testament. Stuhlmacher's work contributes to a deeper understanding of the New Testament by emphasizing its historical context and continuity with the Old Testament.

Frank Thielman, an American theologian, and professor at Beeson Divinity School, takes a more canonical approach to New Testament theology. His work is influenced by the American evangelical tradition, which places a strong emphasis on the authority and unity of Scripture. Thielman's theology is characterized by a focus on the individual authors of the New Testament and their unique theological perspectives.

In his work, "Theology of the New Testament: A Canonical and Synthetic Approach," Thielman explores the theology of each New Testament book within its own historical context and then synthesizes the various theologies into a unified whole. He emphasizes the diversity of the New Testament while also affirming its underlying unity. Thielman's work contributes to a deeper understanding of the New Testament by highlighting the unique theological perspectives of its various authors and their contributions to the overall message of the New Testament.

In conclusion, both Stuhlmacher and Thielman offer valuable insights into New Testament theology. Stuhlmacher's historical-critical approach and emphasis on continuity with the Old Testament provide a solid foundation for understanding the New Testament in its historical context. Thielman's canonical approach and focus on the unique theological perspectives of the New Testament authors offer a more nuanced understanding of the New Testament's diverse yet unified message. Together, their works contribute to a deeper and more comprehensive understanding of New Testament theology.

Expert Answers

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The generated response does a good job of comparing the New Testament theologies of Peter Stuhlmacher and Frank Theilman. It covers their various approaches, works, and contexts clearly and concisely. To help you better understand some points, though, let’s define a couple terms in more detail.

The response correctly identifies Stuhlmacher as focusing on the historical-critical approach. This technique attempts to reconstruct the historical context behind the Bible. It uses external historical sources, language studies, and cultural explorations to delve into the background, so to speak, and to examine the original authors, audiences, motives, and understandings. While this can be a very useful course of study, sometimes historical-critical scholars lose sight of the bigger picture of the Bible. They can get lost in the details of reconstruction and push the actual text as it stands into the background.

Canonical criticism, as practiced by scholars like Thielman, tries to balance out that tendency. It focuses on the Bible as a “canon” of texts, as a whole book with parts that are interrelated and that help explain each other. Canonical criticism recognizes that the various books of the Bible were written by different people in different times and places, but it tries to find the elements of unity. It looks at the Bible as one story.

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