Quotes

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Last Reviewed on June 19, 2019, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 278

Redefining Realness is a memoir by Janet Mock, in which she tells the story of growing up as a black transgender woman and her path to finding herself and living her life authentically. There are many powerful quotes in this memoir, many of which deal with themes of identity, voice, and the power of narrative.

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In one particular quote that speaks to the central message of the book, Janet Mock writes,

I believe that telling our stories, first to ourselves and then to one another and the world, is a revolutionary act. It is an act that can be met with hostility, exclusion, and violence. It can also lead to love, understanding, transcendence, and community. I hope that my being real with you will help empower you to step into who you are and encourage you to share yourself with those around you.

This quote is important because it reflects an essential theme of Janet Mock's memoir (and a central reason that she wrote the book): the power that comes from marginalized or oppressed people telling their own stories.

Here is another powerful quote from this book:

Those parts of yourself that you desperately want to hide and destroy will gain power over you. The best thing to do is face and own them, because they are forever a part of you.

This quote speaks to the importance of being honest about who you truly are and trying to live a life that is reflective of your authentic self, even though this is not always easy to do.

These are just a couple of the many other powerful and important quotations that can be found in this book!

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