Describe Squeaky's view on phoniness and girlishness in "Raymond's Run".

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In "Raymond's Run" by Toni Cade Bambara, Squeaky's attitudes towards phoniness and girlishness are the same. She does not like either! She is irritated by Cynthia Procter, who, according to Squeaky, is a phony. Cynthia acts like she never practices piano or studies for spelling bees, but then when the time comes for a test or a bee, Cynthia aces it. She also often just happens to sit down on the piano bench and plays as though she is an expert. 

"But of course when I pass her house on my early morning trots around the block, she is practicing the scales on the piano over and over and over and over" (Bambara 3).

To Squeaky, that is like cheating. She does not see anything wrong with practicing in front of people. Squeaky prides herself on working on her running whenever she has an opportunity, and she doesn't care who sees her.

She also thinks it's silly for girls to get all dressed up and dance around the May Pole even though her mother wishes she would "act like a girl for a change" (Bambara 5).m Squeaky believes in being herself, and the person she is is not that little girl dressing up to dance.

"...when you should be trying to be yourself, whatever that is, which is as far as I am concerned, a poor Black girl who really can't afford to buy shoes and a new dress you only wear once a lifetime 'cause it won't fit next year" (Bambara 6).

Squeaky thinks everyone should be himself/herself, not some made-up version that someone else—like a parent or teacher or friend—has in mind. 

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Describe Squeaky’s attitude toward phoniness and girlishness in the story "Raymond's Run" by Toni Cade Bambara.

Squeaky is depicted as a tomboy, who is athletically gifted and extremely competitive. Squeaky respects genuine individuals and comments on her contempt toward phony people. Squeaky mentions, "Now some people like to act like things come easy to them, won’t let on that they practice. Not me" (Bambara, 2). She proceeds to comment on how Cynthia Procter pretends to be intellectually gifted and musically talented but spends the majority of her free time studying and practicing on the piano while acting like everything comes natural to her. Squeaky emphasizes her distaste for phony people by saying, "I could kill people like that" (Bambara, 2). She also despises her former friend, Mary Louise, who acted phony and is now friends with her new rival, Gretchen. In addition to disliking phony individuals, Squeaky cannot stand behaving feminine. She believes that May Pole dancing is a complete waste of time and upsets her mother because she refuses to participate in the popular event. Squeaky comments that she hates wearing dresses and "trying to act like a fairy or a flower or whatever." Instead of embracing traditional feminine activities, Squeaky would much rather exercise and compete in athletic events.

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Describe Squeaky’s attitude toward phoniness and girlishness in the story "Raymond's Run" by Toni Cade Bambara.

Squeaky, in "Raymond's Run" by Toni Cade Bambara, reacts with disdain to phoniness. She sees Cynthia Procter as a phony because Cynthia pretends she does not have to study for spelling bees or practice the piano, but Squeaky knows she really does.

"...when I pass her house on my early morning trots around the block, she is practicing the scales on the piano over and over and over and over. Then in music class she always lets herself get bumped around so she falls accidentally on purpose onto the piano stool and is so surprised to find herself sitting there that she decides just for fun to try out the ole keys. A regular prodigy. I could kill people like that.

Squeaky does not like "girlishness" either, which is why she skips the May Pole dance. She does not see the point of dressing up in fancy clothes to pretend she's a flower or a fairy or anything else. She just wants to be herself She wants to run. Squeaky thinks it is nonsense to pretend she's something other than who she is.

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