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In "The Raven," how does the speaker react to the tapping and whispering "Lenore"?

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In "The Raven" by Edgar Allen Poe, the speaker describes having heard a rapping, tapping at his door. He is filled with unease but resolves that this is only a visitor knocking at his door; however, he soon discovers that no one is actually at the door. His heart burns with the hope that his lost love has returned and he whispers “Lenore” into the dark hallway. The speaker has already expressed his deep sorrow for the loss of Lenore (who is presumably dead as Poe’s own wife had been when he composed this), so we can surmise that the influence of these feelings on his tired mind has caused every sound, every moving shadow to morph from something natural to supernatural; he begins to hope that these things are a result of Lenore’s ghostly presence. When he whispers "Lenore," however, the only response he receives is one of his own voice echoing through the hallway. The tapping then occurs at the window, which he opens only to have the raven fly in, so he continues the poem with him trying to discern the meaning of “Nevermore”.

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When the speaker first hears the tapping, he becomes anxious and feels that he is filled with "fantastic terrors."  He attempts to calm himself by reasoning that he simply has a late-night visitor.  However, when he opens the door and sees that no one is there, the speaker's anxiety returns, and he begins to think that the ghost of Lenore is in the hallway.  When he whispers the name "Lenore!" all he hears in return is the echo of his own voice.  The confirmation that there is no ghost in the hallway angers the speaker because he has been tormented by the loss of Lenore.  His reactions to the tapping and his actions in the hallway suggest that the speaker has not yet let go of his lost love.

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