Setting

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Last Updated on May 13, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 149

The setting of this book is within the fantasy world Rowling created for Harry Potter and his friends; a place where witches and wizards engage in all sorts of magic, including games that involve the use of magical broomsticks and that engage players with extraordinary powers. When J. K. Rowling brought Harry Potter and his friends to life, she created a world in which the rules of logic no longer exist. Because children of all ages found themselves immersed in Rowling's magic world, she embellished that world with enough details to sustain the magic. The setting of this book therefore, as well as its companion book Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, is in the imagination. Rowling takes readers back into Harry's imaginary world, to the library of the Hogwarts' school, and to places such as Moose Jaw, Saskachewan, the home of Canada's three most celebrated Quidditch teams.

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Literary Qualities

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Last Updated on May 13, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 291

Rowling uses numerous devices to make her book a credible representation of an actual book from the Hogwarts' library. First and foremost, she does not identify herself as the author, but rather she creates a fictional character who anyone immersed in the magic world of Harry Potter can believe had the proper credentials to write the book. Then she embellishes her story with other colorful characters who, like Whisp, add to the suspension of disbelief. The creation of a network of secret societies also adds to the suspension of disbelief. Rowling mentions the regulations on the game of Quidditch imposed by the Department of Magical Games and Sports, for instance. She explains that this department developed as a result of the International Statute of Wizarding Secrecy of 1692, which made every Ministry of Magic "directly responsible for the consequences of magical sports played within their territories." Furthermore, all the characters including Kennilworthy Whisp, Madam Pince, Gertie Keddle, and the Quidditch players of the past all appear to be dedicated to maintaining the "secrecy" of their wizarding ways.

Quidditch Through the Ages and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them came about long after Rowling succeeded in captivating children worldwide with her use of enchantment. She clearly knows the world she has created so well that details seem to come effortlessly. She can recount statistics of the game, she can detail the rules, and she can provide humorous accounts of past players and past matches. In order to maintain the suspension of disbelief, Rowling also includes diagrams and illustrations, copies of fictional newspaper articles, excerpts from letters and diaries purportedly archived in places such as the Norwegian Ministry of Magic, and copies of items on display in the Museum of Quidditch in London.

Social Sensitivity

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Last Updated on May 13, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 201

The wide appeal of Rowling's books and the success she has had in creating a world of magic influenced this author to create both Quidditch Through the Ages and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. Both of these books are geared to Harry Potter fans specifically, but they are unique and amusing enough to appeal to anyone who peruses fantasy books and to anyone who finds themselves captivated by the idea of a world that transcends the rules of logic. There has been some criticism of Rowling's motives for writing Quidditch Through the Ages and its companion book Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. Due to the popularity of her Harry Potter books, Rowling probably felt confident that people would devour anything that kept them captivated by Harry Potter's world, and she published these two books at a time when readers were eagerly awaiting another fix of Harry Potter's magic. Though these two books certainly boosted Rowling's popularity, she wrote them after Comic Relief approached her about writing something for charity. Proceeds from both Quidditch Through the Ages and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them support Comic Relief, and have provided funds to needy children around the world.

For Further Reference

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Last Updated on May 13, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 130

Bethune, Brian. "Fun and Games with Harry." MacLean's 114(12) (March 19, 2001): 50. Review of Quidditch Through the Ages and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.

Cooper, Ilene. Booklist (May 1, 2001): 1683-1684. Review of Quidditch Through the Ages and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.

Gleick, Elizabeth. "The Wizard of Hogwarts." Time 153(14) (April 12, 1999): 86. Discusses Rowling's success as an author, gives brief biographical information about her, and some information on the appeal of her books.

Gray, Paul. "Magic 101." Time (March 19, 2001): 77. Review of Quidditch Through the Ages and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.

Jones, Malcolm. Newsweek (March 19,2001): 62. Review of Quidditch Through the Ages and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.

Maduran, Jane. "Textbooks for Wizards." The Tech 121(16) www.tech.mit.edu.

Richards, Linda. "Spellbinding Textbooks." Januarymagazine www.januarymagazine.com/ kidsbooks/rowlingcomicrelief/html.

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