Can you provide an example of how an officer might use the SARA model in policing?

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The SARA model is a police problem-solving technique that involves scanning, analysis, response, and assessment. It could be used to examine the events that led up to a riot at a concert.

  • Scanning: This would involve identifying the riot as a problem and setting goals to prevent future such events from occurring.
  • Analysis: This step involves identifying the events that led up to the riot and using data, including interviews with police officers, bystanders, and participants in the riot, as well as video or other data to analyze what came before the event and the event itself. This type uses the data to produce a working hypothesis about why this event occurred.
  • Response: During this stage of the analysis, investigators identify possible new ways to handle a riot or the antecedent to a riot and determine resources that might be helpful in preventing future riots. For example, to prevent a riot from breaking out at a concert, the police might decide to use gates or to control crowd behavior.
  • Assessment: This stage involves determining whether the intervention, such as controlling crowds at concerts, has produced the desired effect, including fewer arrests, less unruly crowd behavior, and safe attendance at events. 
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SARA is a problem-solving model that entails scanning, analysis, response, and assessment. Crime is a problem that law enforcement agents deal with on a day to day basis. Thus, as a model, SARA can be used to provide solutions to deal with crime and crime related activities.

Scanning: The police under this section identify the problem; one example, for instance, could be organized crime by gangs. A description of the gangs and their identifiable characteristics is also provided.

Analysis: Once the police identify organized crime by gangs as the problem, they will need to identify members of these gangs, their motivations, their numbers, and the environmental factors that support their activities.

Response: The police will outline solutions to combat the problem of organized crime. The enforcement agents may start with sensitizing the community and seeking their support, infiltrate the gangs to gain insider knowledge of their operations, or develop an action plan of dismantling the gangs and rehabilitating the members.

Assessment: The enforcement agents and agencies would evaluate the process and determine its impact and effectiveness in combating crime. It is also at this level that they would identify additional problems that hinder the efficacy of their law enforcement activities.

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A police officer could use the SARA model in many different circumstances.  One such circumstance would be a situation in which there were a number of break-ins in a given neighborhood.  Let us see how SARA would apply here.

The first step in SARA is scanning.  This is the step in which the problem is identified.  An officer could look at crime statistics to make sure that the number of break-ins in the neighborhood really is high compared to other neighborhoods.  This is important to make sure that this really is a problem.

The second step is analysis.  The officer would try to determine what might be causing this problem.  For example, if a burglary suspect is apprehended, the officer might question that person to try to understand what is causing them to commit crimes in this particular time and place.

The third step is response.  Let us say that the officer believes that the crimes are caused by a lack of vigilance in the neighborhood on the part of residents and police.  The officer could then start a neighborhood watch program.  They could patrol the area more often.  These actions would be logical responses to the way they analyzed the situation.

Finally, there is assessment.  After a suitable period of time, the officer would need to look at the crime statistics and see if the break-ins have become less frequent.  This step would help to determine if the response was the correct one. 

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What is an example of when the police could use the SARA model?

We like to think of policing as a fixed practice with a rigid procedure that never changes. However, police and law enforcement entities are always studying new ways to effectively do their jobs. One of these methods is the SARA model, a model by which police address continuing and recurring problems within a community. SARA is an acronym that stands for scanning, analysis, response, and assessment. First, the police will scan an affected area or community to identify a problem, next the police will conduct a detailed analysis to define the core of the problem, if any. Finally, police will work with the community to form an effective response to the problem and continually assess it for adjustment.

For example, suppose a community has a continued problem with vandalism and petty crime committed by teenagers. After identifying this problem by scanning, the police might then identify the core problem of many young persons having too much unsupervised time after school hours due to parents' working hours. Next, the police might work with local schools and community centers to create more after school programs to engage with young people. In the last phase, the effectiveness of this implementation would be observed and adjusted as necessary.

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What is an example of when the police could use the SARA model?

The SARA model is often used by police departments to address community issues and reoccurring crimes. The model includes the following components: scanning, analysis, response, and assessment. For example, the SARA model may be used to take a look at a spike in crime in a neighborhood. The department would first scan the crime reports for recurring problems and crime data. They would prioritize the problems and identify some areas of concern, like gang violence in the neighborhood. The police would then analyze the problem by looking at data and all information related to the issue. In the case of gang violence, the police may look at patterns (time of crimes, locations, age of perpetrators, and so on). After a close analysis, the police may determine that a majority of the gang crime is occurring on weekend evenings near a local park by young adults. The next step in the process is to respond. Officials may brainstorm and identify interventions and then carry out a response plan. In the example of gang violence, the department may decide to change shifts to offer more patrols through the park area. They may also work with the local school district to create positive alternatives for students who may be at risk for joining a gang. The final step in the process is assessment. Data on the intervention should be collected. The intervention strategies should be assessed for effectiveness. In our example, the police could look at local gang crime statistics and see if there is a reduction in gang crimes within the area.

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What is an example of when the police could use the SARA model?

To answer this question, we first need to clarify what the SARA model is. The acronym was developed in the field of community policing, and it stands for Scanning, Analysis, Response, and Assessing Results (Evaluation).

To provide an example, I will consider a hypothetical situation in which there have been a number of muggings taking place in a particular suburban park.

Scanning involves getting to grips with what the problem is. In this case, it would involve determining how many muggings had been reported to have taken place in this park and whether or not there are any common factors in the reports (i.e., time of day) or whether the victims have had a similar profile (i.e., elderly women walking on their own).

The first A in SARA stands for Analysis, and this would involve looking at this park and trying to ascertain why it has become a problem area. Is it in a low-income area? Is the area particularly secluded?

The police would then respond (R) to their findings. This may mean employing a security guard to monitor the park, erecting fences around the park, or putting up signs to warn people about the potential danger.

The final A stands for Assessing results. This means figuring out whether the above-mentioned Responses solved the problem or made a remarkable difference. If the park has been found to be safer, then the police's intervention has had a positive impact.

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What is an example of when the police could use the SARA model?

Police officers could use the SARA model in any number of situations.  One possible situation might be the case of a downtown area in which many break-ins were occurring at night.

First, the police officers would need to do the Scanning part of SARA to determine if this is really a problem.  They might look at the number of crimes that are being committed now and compare it to past years to see if a real upsurge is occurring.

Second, assuming that the police decide that the break-ins are a real problem, they would then start to Analyze.  They would look at various kinds of data to try to determine why people are breaking in to these stores. 

Third, the police would prepare and implement their Response.  They might, for example, suggest that merchants install better lighting and/or security cameras to deter burglars.  They might institute more frequent patrols of the area that is being hit.  If they have determined that most of the burglars are drug addicts, they might push for more drug rehabilitation programs in their city.  Any or all of these might work to reduce the number of break-ins.

Finally, they will Analyze.  After the Response has been given a sufficient period to work, the police can look at data to see if the number of break-ins has gone down as much as they would like.  If it has, good.  If not, they will need to go back to the second step (Analyze) in the process.

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