Peter Greenaway Further Reading - Essay

Further Reading

(Contemporary Literary Criticism)

CRITICISM

Collins, Amy Fine, and Bradley Collins. “Drowning the Text.” Art in America 80, no. 6 (June 1992): 53–55.

Collins and Collins examine the numerous allusions and references in Prospero's Books, which they claim are successful in “translating the art historical into the cinematic.”

Gras, Vernon. “Dramatizing the Failure to Jump the Culture/Nature Gap: The Films of Peter Greenaway.” New Literary History 26, no. 1 (winter 1995): 123–43.

Gras examines the allegory, metaphor, and subtext in Greenaway's feature-length films, up to Prospero's Books.

Greenaway, Peter, and Marlene Rodgers. “Prospero's Books—Word and Spectacle.” Film Quarterly 45, no. 2 (winter 1991–1992): 11–19.

Greenaway discusses the character development and water imagery in Prospero's Books, as well as the portrayal of culture and the artist in the world in Greenaway's other works.

Greenaway, Peter, and Gavin Smith. “Food for Thought.” Film Comment 26, no. 3 (May–June 1990): 54–60.

Greenaway discusses how his background as a painter influenced the making of The Cook, the Thief, His Wife, and Her Lover, and comments on art, consumerism, satire, and Hollywood.

Lawrence, Amy. “Introduction.” In The Films of Peter Greenaway, pp. 1–19. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997.

Lawrence offers an overview of Greenaway's life and his body of work.

———. “Shock Tactics: The Cook, the Thief, His Wife, and Her Lover.” In The Films of Peter Greenaway, pp. 165–191. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997.

Lawrence analyzes the dominant themes of The Cook, the Thief, His Wife, and Her Lover and places the film in a historical cinematic context.

Pally, Marcia. “Order vs. Chaos: The Films of Peter Greenaway.” Cineaste 18, no. 3 (1991): 3–5, 37.

Pally offers an overview of a number of Greenaway's better-known films.

Pascoe, David. “The Book Depository.” In Peter Greenaway: Museums and Moving Images, pp. 158–92. London: Reaktion Books, 1997.

Pascoe discusses the use of sex and text as recurring symbols in Greenaway's films.

Rafferty, Terrence. “Conspicuous Consumer.” New Yorker 66, no. 12 (7 May 1990): 88–90.

Rafferty criticizes The Cook, the Thief, His Wife, and Her Lover for its abundance of pretension and attitude.

Additional coverage of Greenaway's life and career is contained in the following sources published by the Gale Group: Contemporary Authors, Vol. 127, and Literature Resource Center.