Chapter 3 Summary

Mr. Shepherd takes it upon himself to find someone to rent Sir Elliot’s house. Shepherd begins by building up the notion that a man in the navy might make the perfect tenant. A man in the British Navy, Shepherd tells Sir Walter, is known for taking particular care of his own possessions. Therefore, he most assuredly would take great care not only of Sir Elliot’s manor but any paintings or furnishings Sir Elliot may wish to leave behind or store at the house. Shepherd’s daughter, Penelope Clay, agrees with her father and supports his assumptions about naval men. She claims to have known several sailors and backs up her father’s statements concerning the reputation naval men have for being neat. They would even take care of...

(The entire section is 656 words.)