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Chapter 1 Summary

The Pearl opens with a short preface—a single paragraph of text stating that the tale of Kino, his wife, and their infant son, Coyotito, has become legendary in their town. Moreover, the narrator says, the story has come to be viewed in extremes: some recall the family’s experience in only the best terms, while others only recall the worst of it.

Chapter 1 begins as Kino awakens before dawn to the sound of animals outside the small dwelling. He takes notice of the sunrise and then looks on his small family—his son who sleeps in a small box hanging in the home and his wife, Juana, who is already awake and looking at him lovingly. In this state of contentment, Kino closes his eyes and reflects on the blessing of his family. For the moment, he is in a state of absolute contentment.

As Juana builds a fire in the little house made of brush, Kino steps outside and observes his surroundings. He appreciatively observes the sunrise and a progression of ants. His wife’s silent yet steady preparation for the day reinforces his sense of security. The love he feels for his small family almost overwhelms him.

When Juana finishes preparing the meal, Kino goes inside to eat his simple breakfast, which he consumes with satisfaction. Once he has finished, Juana approaches to begin her meal. To his horror, Kino notices a scorpion crawling down a rope into the box that holds his son, Coyotito. As Kino delicately approaches the box, Juana whispers superstitious prayers for the safety of their child. Although Kino is extremely cautious in his movements, little Coyotito utters a childish laugh and inadvertently shakes the scorpion into the box. Kino lunges to catch it, but it falls onto the infant’s shoulder and stings him. The baby screams out in pain as his father angrily and viciously kills the scorpion.

The child’s screams alert the neighbors, and they crowd into the little house. Juan Tomas, Kino’s brother, is among them as the news spreads of the scorpion sting. The local residents...

(The entire section is 691 words.)