A Passage to India

by E. M. Forster

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Part II, Chapters XXX – XXXII: Summary

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Last Updated March 22, 2023.

Mr. Das pays a visit to Aziz at the hospital, requesting a poem for Mr. Battacharya's upcoming magazine. Acknowledging that Aziz might bear a grudge against him, the two men end their meeting in a semi-embrace.

Aziz starts composing a poem about the decline of Islam and love, deciding to rise above the Islamic history and strive to embrace India as a whole. He plans to leave British India and seek a position in a Hindu region. However, Hamidullah cautions him against this idea. Hamidullah slyly shares a rumor that Miss Quested was romantically involved with Fielding and suggests taking Aziz behind the purdah curtain.

Fielding arrives back from a conference and is picked up by Aziz at the station, who informs him about a scandal involving Mr. McBryde and Miss Derek being caught in an affair. Aziz then proceeds to share some gossip about Miss Quested, but Fielding doesn't find it significant. Aziz lectures Fielding about the abundance of spies, which he perceives as a threat. Feeling the tension in the air, Fielding confronts Aziz and urges him to express his true thoughts.

Aziz slyly suggests that Fielding is having a romantic relationship with "Madamsell Adela." This accusation surprises and angers Fielding, causing him to call Aziz a "little rotter." Aziz is deeply hurt by Fielding's insult but pretends not to be offended. Fielding apologizes and attempts to clarify the situation. However, Aziz abruptly realizes that he has other plans and cannot have dinner with Fielding. Mr. Turton coldly demands that Fielding join him at the Club that evening.

After Fielding's uncomfortable visit to the Club, where he encounters the new officials who have replaced Major Callendar and Heaslop, he and Aziz share a meal together. During their dinner, Fielding informs Aziz that he is being sent back to England for a while.

Aziz brings up Miss Quested and inquires if Fielding plans to meet her in London. However, he then expresses his desire to depart and declines Fielding's offer of a ride in his carriage, opting instead to ride his bicycle. Aziz suspects that Fielding's true intention for traveling to London is to wed Miss Quested for her wealth. He goes on to elaborate further on this imagined scenario.

Fielding composes a letter of clarification that fails to satisfy Aziz. In a distant manner, Aziz responds by announcing his plan to go on vacation and will not return until after Fielding's departure. Additionally, he mentions that he will have relocated to his new position by the time Fielding returns. Aziz's companions subsequently support his doubts, and he becomes convinced that Fielding has wedded Miss Quested shortly after Fielding's departure.

While traveling back to England, Fielding experiences a renewed appreciation for the serene and aesthetic beauty of Egypt, Crete, and Venice. He is especially captivated by the artistic elegance of Venice, where he finds pleasure in the concept of form. Fielding perceives the Mediterranean region as a representation of normal human existence, whereas the departure from the south of the Mediterranean is associated with the bizarre and abnormal.

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Part II, Chapters XXVII – XXIX: Summary

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Part III, Chapter XXXIII: Summary