A Passage to India

by E. M. Forster

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Part II, Chapters XXII – XXIII: Summary

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Last Updated March 22, 2023.

Adela is recovering at the McBryde's bungalow, with Miss Derek and Mrs. McBryde tending to her and removing cactus spines from her body. She becomes tearful whenever she recounts the Marabar Caves incident. A persistent echo troubles her, making her feel as if Evil has been unleashed and is infiltrating others' lives.

Once Adela's fever subsides, Heaslop takes her away. He informs her about the near-riot during the Mohurram procession and her upcoming court appearance. She requests Mrs. Moore's presence during the trial. Both McBryde and Heaslop express dismay that an Indian judge will oversee a case involving an Englishwoman. Adela receives a letter from Fielding, claiming Aziz's innocence, which concerns her in regard to Heaslop's treatment by Fielding.

Upon arriving at Mrs. Moore's bungalow, Ronny warns Adela about his mother's irritability. Mrs. Moore seems reluctant to help and declines to testify. She remains focused on her own issues. Adela suddenly insists that Aziz is innocent, but Ronny tries to divert her attention with a story about Nureddin and Aziz. He calls Major Callendar to examine Adela.

Adela becomes convinced that Mrs. Moore said Aziz was good, but Ronny denies this and attributes it to Fielding's letter. Adela agrees but is asked not to mention Aziz's innocence again. Mrs. Moore, however, confirms that she believes in Aziz's innocence but still refuses to help. Adela wonders if the case can be dropped but acknowledges it's unlikely. Heaslop agrees, and Mrs. Moore ominously states that the process has begun and will continue until its conclusion. Heaslop secretly plans to send his mother back to England as soon as possible.

Mrs. Moore accepts Lady Mellanby's offer to share her reserved cabin and departs as she desired. She exists in a "spiritual muddledom" that paralyzes her. Her experience in the caves exposed a bleak eternity. As she journeys to Bombay alone, she reflects on not having visited the right places in India.

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Part II, Chapters XVIII – XXI: Summary

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Part II, Chapter XXIV: Summary