Discussion Topic

Comparison of the Greasers and Socs in "The Outsiders"

Summary:

The Greasers and Socs in The Outsiders represent two conflicting social groups. The Greasers, from poorer backgrounds, are characterized by their rough appearance and emotional bonds. In contrast, the Socs are wealthy, privileged, and often emotionally detached. Despite their differences, both groups struggle with similar issues like identity, belonging, and the pressures of society.

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What would Socs be like as Greasers and vice versa in The Outsiders?

The Socs are the rich kids, and the Greasers are the poor kids. In order for one to become a member of the other group, he would have to change social class and basically gain or lose money.

The distinction between the Socs and Greasers is social class. Ponyboy explains that “organized gangs are rarities-there are just small bunches of friends who stick together, and the warfare is between the social classes” (p. 12). They fight each other because they are gangs, but the gangs are based on neighborhood and class distinctions. Ponyboy notes that, “I'm not saying that either Socs or greasers are better; that's just the way things are” (p. 4).

The Socs are described as “the Socials, the jet set, the West side rich kids” (p. 3). The Greasers are from the East side, a less desirable neighborhood.

Ponyboy says that the Greasers are “poorer than the Socs and the middle class” and wilder (p. 4). He describes the Greasers as “almost like hoods” because they “steal things and drive old souped-up cars and hold up gas stations and have a gang fight once in a while” (p. 4). Physically, they “just like we wear our hair long and dress in blue jeans and T-shirts, or leave our shirttails out and wear leather jackets and tennis shoes or boots” (p. 4).

The Socs, on the other hand, “jump greasers and wreck houses and throw beer blasts for kicks, and get editorials in the paper for being a public disgrace one day and an asset to society the next” (p. 4). Part of the bitterness the Greasers feel is that they cannot get ahead, because “you can't win against them no matter how hard you try, because they've got all the breaks and even whipping them isn't going to change that fact” (p. 12).

In the end, Ponyboy realizes through his association with Cherry that the Socs and Greasers are artificial barriers. He says

Maybe the two different worlds we lived in weren't so different. We saw the same sunset. (p. 42)

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Is there no difference between the Greasers and the Socs in "The Outsiders"?

While I can't wholeheartedly agree with a statement that claims the Greasers and Socs are completely alike, I do agree that they are alike in many ways.  

Despite the socioeconomic divide that separates the two groups, the Greasers and the Socs are similar in age.  Each gang has its range of ages, but both gangs are comprised of teenage boys.  That brings up another similarity.  Both gangs are filled with males.  Ponyboy might say that Marcia and Cherry are Socs, but that is only because of how much money their parents have.  It's not because those two ladies are actually involved in the gang turf war.  

Cherry does help Ponyboy and the reader to begin seeing both gangs as more similar than dissimilar.  She is the person that tells Pony that not all Socs are violent thugs.  She also tells Pony that the Socs have their fair share of problems too when she says "Things are rough all over."  

Both groups of boys have family problems and struggles at home.  Both groups enjoy going to the movies.  Both groups tend to take their frustrations out in violent ways.  Both groups have gravitated toward forming a brotherhood of kindred spirits.  Lastly, both groups tend to see themselves as rebels and nonconformists.  

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How are the Greasers and the Socs alike and different in The Outsiders?

The Greasers and the Socs are the two rival gangs in Susan Hinton's teen novel "The Outsiders." The Socs (short for socialites) are mostly rich kids from wealthy families--preppy types with nice clothes and flashy cars. The Greasers are poor kids from the wrong side of the tracks with long, well-oiled hair and black leather jackets. Both groups are outcasts from middle class society, and both groups feel they are outsiders from their parents and other teens their age. Both groups like to fight to decide their conflicts, and the occasional weapon is not frowned upon.

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What similarities exist between Socials and Greasers in The Outsiders?

That's an interesting question.  At first glace the two groups are nothing alike.  That's for sure what Ponyboy Curtis thinks.  It's Cherry Valence who first makes him consider otherwise when she says the following in chapter 2.  

"We have troubles you've never even heard of. You want to know something?" She looked me straight in the eye. "Things are rough all over."

I'm not sure how many body paragraphs you plan to write or how many similarities you need, but I think you could do a paragraph about surface level similarities and another one on "deeper" similarities.  

On the surface, both groups are the same age.  They are both mainly comprised of males.  I'm not 100% sold on calling Cherry a Soc either, so you might want to argue that they are all males.  Both groups attend the same school.  Both groups enjoy going to the drive in.  Both groups seem to enjoy a good rumble.  

On the "deeper" level, it seems that both groups share an appreciation for beauty.  That sounds weird in relation to two gangs that like fighting, but the sunset thing is a consistent motif throughout the novel. 

"I pictured that, or tried to. Maybe Cherry stood still and watched the sun set while she was supposed to be taking the garbage out. Stood there and watched and forgot everything else until her big brother screamed at her to hurry up. I shook my head. It seemed funny to me that the sunset she saw from her patio and the one I saw from the back steps was the same one. Maybe the two different worlds we lived in weren't so different. We saw the same sunset."

Both groups believe that they are rebels of a sort, and both groups tend to internalize at home family issues.  Lastly, because both groups gravitate toward rumbles so much, it's clear that their preferred method of dealing with emotional angst is to use violence.  

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Are the Socs and Greasers different from their own perceptions?

One of the significant life lessons that Ponyboy learns throughout the novel concerns the fact that the Socs are not the happy-go-lucky teenagers that he initially assumes they are. At the beginning of the novel, Ponyboy views the Socs as arrogant teenagers who have absolutely no worries and live wonderful lives because they are wealthy. However, Ponyboy learns from Cherry Valance that the Socs have different issues that they deal with on an everyday basis. Despite being affluent, the Socs have to always maintain appearances and act callously toward one another in order to be perceived as cool. Cherry informs Ponyboy that being a Soc is one big rat race. Later in the novel, Randy Adderson explains to Pony that Bob Sheldon was searching for someone to tell him "No," and he needed an authority figure. In contrast to Pony's initial thoughts, Randy is portrayed as a jaded, confused individual who is worried about his future. Through Ponyboy's several interactions with Cherry Valance and Randy Adderson, he learns that Socs also have serious issues. Similarly, Cherry and Randy learn that Greasers can be compassionate, heroic, and trustworthy from their interactions with Pony. Overall, both gangs gain valuable insight into the nature of their rivals and realize that their preconceived notions were incorrect.

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What is your opinion about the Socs or the Greasers in The Outsiders?

Concerning your question about the two social and economic classes featured in The Outsiders, this is really a question you have to answer for yourself.  My answer can't really help you.  My answer reflects my background and my likes and dislikes, not yours.  Here are some things to consider or to be aware of.

First, the story is told from the point of view of Ponyboy and company, of course, since Ponyboy is the narrator.  The reader generally identifies with a story's point-of-view character.  So it is natural that a reader might like or at least identify more with Ponyboy, etc.

But your assignment is really even easier than that suggests.  All you have to do is give your opinion of one of the two groups.  Just ask yourself some questions about whichever group you choose:

  • Who are they and why do they do what they do?
  • Are their reasons justified?
  • What emotions do they reveal?  Or what emotions do they hide?
  • Did you find yourself hoping they would win or lose the rumble?
  • How realistic or life-like are they?
  • What exactly is your opinion of them?

Answering these questions for yourself should make your assignment really easy.  As long as you've read the book you should have no problems.   

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What is your opinion about the Socs or the Greasers in The Outsiders?

It would be better if you had a more specific question as to what you want opinions about.  But I'll try and I hope it will be useful...

In my opinion, the Socs and the Greasers are both the same.  I kind of like them both and I kind of dislike them both.  I think that both gangs are filling a purpose in the lives of their members.  Both gangs have members who have something wrong with their home lives or have other sorts of issues where they feel they are not wanted.

But they are both kind of bad.  They both feel like it is acceptable to beat one another up just because they are from different groups.  I do not think that this is something that is really acceptable no matter how hard a life you have.  You can surely find acceptance in a group without having to engage in violence.

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What differences does Ponyboy identify between the Greasers and the Socs?

In Chapter 3, Ponyboy and Cherry are having a discussion about their two different social groups. Initially, Ponyboy mentions that he thought money was the only thing that separated the Socs from the Greasers. Ponyboy is well aware of the economic disparity between the Greasers and Socs, and views them with contempt for their opportunities and material wealth. Cherry elaborates and comments that the Greasers have a whole different set of values, and the Socs were cool to the point of "not feeling anything." She refers to the relationships in her social group as a "rat race," where everyone is constantly moving, but going nowhere. Ponyboy realizes that the Socs were behind a "wall of aloofness," and mentions that they were also cold and impersonal. Ponyboy says, "That's why we're separated...It's not money, it's feeling---you don't feel anything and we feel too violently" (Hinton 34). Ponyboy understands that the Greasers do not hide their intense emotions like the Socs, and realizes that what truly separates them is the way they express their feelings.

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Why did the Greasers have it worse than the Socs in The Outsiders?

Part of the reason that the Greasers have it worse than the Socs is that society favors the Socs over the Greasers.  At one point, the Socs tell Johnny that  "Next time you want a broad, pick up ye own kind — dirt."  This helps to describe how the Socs are able to replicate the social order.  This social order makes life harder for the Greasers than the Socs.  This difficulty is enhanced because the Greasers are poor.  Their economic challenges reflect how they are seen as "hoods" from the "bad part of town."  This aspect of class warfare strikes at the social stigma that they must counter.  It is a reality that the Socs do not have to face, as they come from wealthier and more privileged backgrounds.

The Socs enjoy social advantages that enable them to do things without sanction or judgment.  For example, Socs are able to "jump greasers and wreck houses and throw beer blasts for kicks, and get editorials in the paper for being a public disgrace one day and an asset to society the next."  The two worlds in which both live is one where Socs enjoy advantages that the Greasers lack. The reality of the world is one where Greasers face more closed doors than the Socs. This makes the Greasers experience a more challenging life than their counterparts.  The fact that they must live life being seen as "dirt" is a major reason why the Greasers have it harder than the Socs.

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What are the differences and similarities between the Socs and Greasers in The Outsiders?

For starters, the Socs and the greasers have vast differences in physical appearance. While the Socs, who come from money, are well groomed and neat in appearance, the greasers, who hail from the proverbial wrong side of the tracks, “rarely [bother] to get a haircut.”

The other obvious difference is socioeconomic status. The Socs come from wealthy families, while the greasers do not. This difference can be plainly seen in the cars driven by members of the respective groups. Thanks to their money and privilege, the Socs are far more highly regarded than the greasers, who have been branded as “trouble.”

Ponyboy describes the greasers as being wilder than the Socs. This is far from saying that the Socs are law-abiding young citizens, but they are not as wild as the greasers, who “steal things” and “have a gang fight once in a while.”

In terms of similarities, both the Socs and the greasers are going through the same phase of life: they are growing up in a world in which they are expected to conform to a particular image. Both groups grapple with self-identity issues, with the Socs not living up to what is expected of them and the greasers, with their dysfunctional families, often feeling abandoned.

Members of both the Socs and greasers love a fight. Both groups experience the angst and emotions which are synonymous with the teenage years. Also, Socs and greasers both resent the stereotypes to which they are expected to conform.

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What are the differences and similarities between the Socs and Greasers in The Outsiders?

Differences

  • The Socs come from good backgrounds. They're from the right side of the tracks, from the west side of town.

  • The greasers, on the other hand, are from the wrong side of the tracks, from the East Side. They occupy a position much further down the social ladder than their sworn enemies. They have less money than the Socs, which means that they don't get to drive around in brand new, flashy cars like their rivals.

  • Because of their privileged backgrounds, the Socs are not seen as juvenile delinquents, despite the crimes they commit and their gang activity. The same cannot be said for the greasers, however. They are regarded by society as among the lowest of the low.

Similarities

  • Both the Socs and the greasers are involved in criminal activities. They regularly get into fights and disturb the peace.

  • Socs and greasers are around the same age, and despite their differences, they see gang life as giving them a sense of identity that they might not otherwise have.

  • Following on from the previous point, many members of the rival gangs have severe family problems, which is why they come to look upon gang life as providing them with a kind of surrogate family structure that can provide them with a sense of belonging they simply can't get at home.

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What are the differences and similarities between the Socs and Greasers in The Outsiders?

In addition to the similarities listed by the other educator, the greasers and the Socs are also similar in their experiences as adolescent boys. They are both groups of boys who are trying to deal with the complex process of finding their identity, and they are all dealing with the rollercoaster of emotions that comes with teenage angst. Both groups also have some boys who are more idealistic than others and members who are more pessimistic than others. Also, they are all young people who bend and break the law and struggle to fit in with the wider communities.

There are also some other differences between the groups, like the way they are treated by society and by their fellow gang members. The greasers and the Socs are also treated differently by the general public. Because the greasers are from the poorer, East Side of town, they are viewed as unruly hoodlums. Meanwhile, because the Socs are clean-cut boys from the affluent, west side, they are seen as good young men, despite their frequent bad behavior. The Socs also have a more organized structure to their gang, while the greasers are more like a group of friends—or, as Ponyboy puts it,

we were just buddies who stuck together—each man was his own leader.

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What are the differences and similarities between the Socs and Greasers in The Outsiders?

The Socs and greasers are the two rival groups of teenagers in S. E. Hinton's teen novel, The Outsiders. There are obviously more differences between the groups than similarities.

SIMILARITIES 

  • All of the boys are teens (aside from Darry, who is 20; and possibly the Soc, Paul, Darry's ex-buddy who squares off against him at the rumble).
  • The boys all like to fight, and they all seem to have a general disregard for the law.
  • According to Cherry Valance, the boys aren't so different; like the greasers, the Socs also have family problems.
  • Pony and Cherry both dig sunsets.

DIFFERENCES

  • The greasers wear leather and blue jeans; the Socs wear madras shirts and khaki slacks.
  • The greasers have long, greasy hair; the Socs generally have shorter hair.
  • The greasers are poor, living on the bad side of town; the west-side Socs live in the affluent area of Tulsa.
  • Socs drive nice, new cars; few greasers even own cars, but those who do soup up older models.
  • Greasers are emotional; Socs are "sophisticated—cool to the point of not feeling anything."
  • Greasers are considered juvenile delinquents; Socs are looked upon as "an asset to society."
  • Many of the greasers are dropouts; most, if not all, of the Socs attend high school.
  • The greasers know they will always be on the bottom of the social ladder; the Socs have bright futures ahead of them.
  • The greasers "steal things... and hold up gas stations and have a gang fight once in a while." The Socs "jump greasers and wreck houses and throw beer blasts for kicks."
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What are the differences and similarities between the Socs and Greasers in The Outsiders?

Many similarities and differences exist between the Socs and the greasers in the novel The Outsiders. At the onset of the novel, Ponyboy, the narrator of the story, explains how the term Soc is short for the Socials, or “the jet set, the West-side rich kids” (Hinton 2). This differs greatly from his description of his own group, the greasers who are “poorer than the Socs and the middle class” (Hinton 3), and “wilder, too” (Hinton 3). The differences do not end there. Ponyboy goes on to elaborate further that the Socs “get editorials in the paper for being a public disgrace one day and an asset to society the next” (Hinton 3). While greasers on the other hand are ”almost like hoods” (Hinton 3), who “hold up gas stations and have a gang fight once in a while” (Hinton 3), and who are viewed by society as similar to juvenile delinquents, rather than celebrated like their Soc counterparts. 

Despite these differences, some similarities do exist between the groups. This is not realized until later in the novel when Ponyboy meets a Soc girl named Cherry Valance. Cherry tells Ponyboy that the greasers are not the only ones who struggle and that “Things are rough all over” (Hinton 35). Later, she elaborates when she tells Ponyboy how the Socs are “always going and going and going and never asking where” (Hinton 38). She also confides in him that she will lie about things, such as enjoying beer blasts even though she does not, just to fit in with her friends. It is later in the novel that Ponyboy comes to the realization that despite each group having its own unique problems, they are similar to one another in that both have struggles that they have to deal with in their day-to-day lives.

Hope this helps!

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Compare and contrast the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders. How are they different? Are there any similarities?

In S. E. Hinton's classic novel The Outsiders, the Greasers and Socs are rival gangs, which are engaged in a tragic, ever-going conflict that leads to death and trauma for both social groups. The members of the Soc gang hail from affluent families and reside on the rich West Side of town, while the Greasers grow up in dysfunctional homes and live on the poorer East Side. The Socs are clean-cut teenagers, who wear madras shirts, have tight haircuts, and drive expensive, flashy cars like Mustangs and Corvairs. In contrast, the Greasers are rough-looking teenagers, who wear leather jackets and have long, slick hair.

Since the Socs hail from wealthy families and dress nice, they have a better reputation than the Greasers and enjoy their privileged status. Socs typically get away with the crimes they commit and are portrayed as entitled, superficial adolescents. Unlike the Greasers, the Socs are callous, aloof individuals, who are more concerned with keeping up appearances than being authentic, genuine people. The Greasers do not enjoy the same privileges as Socs, and the authorities blame them for most of the issues in town. The Greasers are also more emotional than the Socs and value friendship over appearances and status.

Despite their many differences, the Greasers and Socs share some similarities. Both social groups engage in deleterious actions, commit crimes, and experience teenage angst. They also suffer from stereotyping and are outsiders in their communities. The Socs do not live up to their society's expectations, and the Greasers feel abandoned by their community. The members of both gangs deal with significant problems in life and must overcome certain obstacles. The teenagers in both gangs also experience identity issues, endure trauma, and deal with peer pressure.

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Compare and contrast the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders. How are they different? Are there any similarities?

While they are from differing socio-economic classes, both the Socs and the Greasers suffer from teen angst, among which are the desire for acceptance as individuals as well as having a common identity, a disappointment in adults and society in general, and an attempt to reconcile their individual perspectives with that of others. In addition, they both resent stereotyping. Sadly, both groups have members who, as Jay Daly writes, carry their "innocence/youth/idealism" to the extreme that all of these are transformed into dangerous and detrimental traits.

Each group has its pessimists and its optimists. Cherry Valance sees goodness in Pony and attempts to reconcile the conflicts between the groups, but, unfortunately, she is killed. Others who retain positive attitudes are Soda and Darry, who differ from Johnny and Dally because they survive without losing their goodness, their "goldness." This "goldness" is achieved through their sacrifices and solicitude toward Ponyboy. But, Ponyboy recognizes that, as Frost writes, "Nothing gold can stay" and he achieves at the end a maturity.

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Compare and contrast the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders. How are they different? Are there any similarities?

In the beginning of the novel Ponyboy focuses on how different the Greasers and Socs are. for example, the biggest difference is the socioeconomic status and all the implications that it comes with. The Greasers tend to be poor. They live in the poorer part of town, they don't wear expensive clothing, they're rough around the edges, they're associated with engaging in more criminal activities and drive cars they are able to work on and fix up. On the other hand, the Socs have everything money can buy. They live in the nicer part of town, they have fancy clothes and cars, they do commit crimes, but get away with it because of the influence that comes with their money. They drink a lot, but mostly because they are bored and have everything they could possibly want. However, as stated previously, they do share some similarities. Both groups engage in criminal activities, both groups also deal with problems. In the beginning of the novel, Cherry points this out when she says, "Things are rough all over."

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Compare and contrast the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders. How are they different? Are there any similarities?

The outcome of the novel, after Dallas, Ponyboy and Johnny rescue the children from the burning house on the poor side of town, demonstrates that the judgments made about the different groups can be overcome by individual actions. The Greasers, being poor and known for mischief and disruptive behavior, prove that their ringleaders are compassionate, brave and of good moral character when they risk their lives to help strangers. Cherry, one of the Socs, is a character who manages to make overtures to help bridge the gaps between the two groups, but this happens mainly because both Dallas and Ponyboy are attracted to her. She and Ponyboy discuss the fact that the stars in the sky are visible from both sides of the town they live in, calling attention to their similarities. The title of the novel itself implies one of the groups is made up of outsiders, when in reality, both sides are removed from society because of the various socioeconomic and cultural factors that set them apart.

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Compare and contrast the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders. How are they different? Are there any similarities?

Besides the monetary differences between the socs and the greasers, there is also the issue of appearance as a result of background -- the "greasers" are called such because of the greasy state of their hair. And while it is true that a fashion of the time was to add oil to one's hair, the greasers' "dos" seem to be a result primarily of poor grooming and lack of hygiene.

In contrast, the socs, having come from a more affluent background, have all the benefits of wealth: clean, neat personal appearance, the latest fashions, slick cars, etc. They are the social elite of this novel, whereas the greasers are considered the poorer, second-class citizens. 

Depending upon which of the socs or greasers we are talking about, there are also individual differences in the characters comprising each class or group. For instance, even within the greasers we have sensitive boys and tough boys, just as the socs have a variety of personalities, as well.

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Compare and contrast the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders. How are they different? Are there any similarities?

The Socials and the Greasers were different in many ways. There are a few that are obvious and others that are not. First, there is the issue of money. Socials were rich kids from the West Side. Greasers were generally poor and lived on the East Side of town. Then, there is the way they are perceived by the public. Greasers were seen as unruly and unlawful. They were looked at as if they were dirty because of their long, greased hair. Socials were seen as good kids who did not get into any trouble. They dressed well and drove nice cars. Next, greasers liked to go the movies or hang out with their friends. To them their "gang" was family. They were known for petty theft and causing other small disturbances. They also liked to smoke cigarettes, drink, and some liked to fight. Socials like to throw parties. They played football or were cheerleaders. They also drank, but were not looked down on by society. Finally, greasers were very emotional. They felt almost violently. Socials were "cool to the point of not feeling anything".

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Compare and contrast the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders. How are they different? Are there any similarities?

The Greasers are a group of boys who live in the poor part of town, whereas the Socs are a gang that are from the wealthy area of town.

After the movie at the drive in, Ponyboy has a discussion with Cherry Valence about the difference between Greasers and Socs. Based on meeting the two Soc girls, Pony thinks that they are very similar in that they are all teenagers with similar interests, except "They liked the Beatles and thought Elvis Preseley was out, and we thought he Beatles were rank, and that Elvis was tuff. But that seemed the only difference to me" (Chap 3).

Cherry points out that Socs and Greasers have a different set of values, though. The Soc's are aloof, cold and don't show feelings, whereas with the Greasers emotions run high.

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Compare and contrast the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders. How are they different? Are there any similarities?

Tim Shepherd's group is an organized gang, while Ponyboy's is more like a group of guys who just hang out together. Ponyboy explains the difference between the two, saying:

"the difference between (Tim Shepherd's) gang and ours - they (have) a leader and (are) organized; we (are) just buddies who (stick) together - each man (is) his own leader".

Tim Shepherd "enjoy(s) being a hood...the rest of his bunch (are) the same way...young hoods - who would grow up to be old hoods". They consciously flout their identity as part of a gang, relishing fights and engaging in petty crime. There is an edge to their personas, and they exist on the outside of accepted social norms.

Ponyboy's gang is more like a family; they keep an open door policy and exist primarily as a means of support for each other when family life or other forces get rough. It is true that the guys in the group like to fight as well, but for them it has as much to do with youthful energy as it does with rivalry with the other gangs. The members of Ponyboy's gang follow strict codes of honor and fairness, but Darry, who is their unheralded leader, aspires to achieve better things for his life and the lives of his brothers. As Ponyboy says, "He's better than the rest of us...he's going somewhere...and I was going to be like him...I wasn't going to live in a lousy neighborhood all my life" (Chapter 9).

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Compare and contrast the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders. How are they different? Are there any similarities?

Chapter 2 presents a few ways that Socs and Greasers differ, to add to the general variations outlined in Chapter 1.  Greasers are poor and have "gangs", and Socs are rich and have "social clubs". They hang out in different places -  Ponyboy says that "the Socs go to The Way Out and to Rusty's, and the Greasers go to "The Dingo and to Jay's".

Aside from these details, the main idea of the Chapter is that, despite their differences, there is a lot that is the same about the two groups.  Both Socs and Greasers get in trouble, and they fight, and although it is easy to resort to sterotyping, both groups are made up of unique individuals.  Cherry describes the situation succinctly when she says, "All Socs aren't like that...that's like saying all you Greasers are like Dally Winston".  Cherry also notes that individuals in both groups face hardships in their lives.  She sums it up with the observation, "I'll bet you think the Socs have it made, the rich kids...I'll tell you something...and it may come as a surprise.  We have troubles you've never even heard of...things are tough all over" (Chapter 2).

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Compare and contrast the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders. How are they different? Are there any similarities?

In the S. E. Hinton novel, The Outsiders, there are two groups of characters--the greasers and the socs. The greasers are a gang of poor teenagers with dysfunctional family situations, and the socs are a group of wealthier teenagers with better family circumstances.

Oddly enough, the socs are more like a gang than the greasers. They are the teenagers who show up at the drive in movie theater drunk. They are the teenagers that follow the greasers as the walk Cherry and her friend home. The socs are the teenagers who attack Johnny and Ponyboy in the park--almost drowning Ponyboy before Johnny is forced into killing one of them to save Ponyboy. The teenagers who have been given every advantage in life are actually the ones functioning with a gang mentality.

The greasers who have had every disadvantage life could throw at them, however, are the ones who seem more civil. Circumstances have melded them into a strong knit family. Johnny and Ponyboy are polite to the soc girls who find themselves in need of escorts after the movie. Johnny risks his own life to save Johnny when the socs are trying to drown him. They run to Dally for advice and he helps them to the best of his present ability. When Ponyboy and Johnny find themselves at the scene of the burning church which had children inside, they didn't hesitate to rush in and save the children. One of the socs later said, he would never have considered putting himself in danger to do that.

Clearly the greasers would be expected to be the more aggressive and less socially approriate, but the socs are actually more aggresive and socially unacceptable in this novel.

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What are the differences and similarities between the Socs and Greasers in The Outsiders?

The greasers reside on the East Side of town and occupy a lower social class than the Socs. The greasers are also considered troublemakers and labeled as society's outcasts. They have terrible reputations throughout town and are judged by their rough, intimidating appearance. Unlike the Socs, the greasers wear leather jackets with denim jeans and slick back their long hair, which is their trademark look.

The greasers also hail from broken homes and have dysfunctional families. Given their similar backgrounds and difficult living situations, the greasers rely on each other and consider themselves family. They are an extremely loyal group of friends and make sacrifices to support each other. Unlike the Socs, the greasers do not put on airs or try to compete with each other. They are genuine, sincere, and straightforward.

The Socs are affluent teenagers who reside on the wealthy West Side of town and have stable households. Since they are rich, the Socs have impeccable reputations and enjoy a privileged lifestyle. They hold beer bashes, drive fast cars, and live carefree and reckless lives. Despite their obvious advantages, the Socs are callous, superficial, and misguided.

Cherry Valance tells Pony that being a Soc is like participating in one big rat race where everyone is trying to outdo each other. The Socs are depicted as dismissive, insincere teenagers who pick on greasers for fun and cause problems without experiencing the consequences. Pony's outlook on the Socs changes after meeting Cherry Valance and Randy Adderson. He realizes that Socs have their own unique set of problems and do not have the perfect lives.

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What are the differences and similarities between the Socs and Greasers in The Outsiders?

Greasers are different from the Socs in that they come from the wrong side of the tracks. They are outcasts from respectable society, members of a class looked down on and despised by those from more upscale neighborhoods. It is this outcast status that gives the Greasers a strong sense of solidarity. It's very much a case of Greasers versus the World. The Greasers know that if they stick together then they'll be so much better for it.

As for the Socs, they lack that sense of being part of something bigger. As they occupy a position higher up the social ladder than the Greasers, they can treat gang life with less seriousness, as all a bit of a game. Their different attitude can be seen most clearly in relation to fighting. While Greasers fight because they have to, Socs fight because they actually get a kick out of it. (No pun intended.)

As the Socs come from good families, they don't see the gang as an alternative family in the way that the Greasers do. There's a sense in which they're playing at gangs—indulging in a hobby of which they'll soon get bored before they grow up and take their privileged place in the adult world.

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What are the differences and similarities between the Socs and Greasers in The Outsiders?

The main difference between the greasers and the Socs is that they are from different social classes.

In The Outsiders, we learn that Socs are from the higher social class and greasers are from the lower social class.  The greasers are different from the Socs in other ways than being poorer though.  The two groups have set themselves at odds.  There is the social club, and the street, and never can the two cross.  Most of the greasers can’t stand the Socs, and vice versa.  They hate each other on principle, and stand up for one another.

Greasers are almost like hoods; we steal things and drive old souped-up cars and hold up gas stations and have a gang fight once in a while. (Ch. 1)

Pony comments that while he considers himself a greaser and is proud to be a greaser, he does not necessarily love to fight and he would not rob someone for fun or even for the money.  He just goes along for the ride.  He dresses in jeans and t-shirts and wears his hair long and greasy, because it’s what he can afford and its part of the neighborhood look.  That is what he is proud of—being part of the neighborhood, and standing by his brothers and friends.  He comments that it is hard to be a greaser though, and that with his parents dead it wears on his oldest brother.

Only Socs. And you can't win against them no matter how hard you try, because they've got all the breaks and even whipping them isn't going to change that fact. (Ch. 1)

The differences between the two groups go beyond entitlement.  Greasers live life passionately.  They care about each other, because that is all they have.  They stand up for each other, and look out for each other.  They are fighting for survival, not out of boredom.  For the Socs, it is much different.  They are just around until something better comes along.  While greasers fight because they feel too much, Socs seem to be the opposite. They fight because they feel too little.

Socs were always behind a wall of aloofness, careful not to let their real selves show through. I had seen a social-club rumble once. The Socs even fought coldly and practically and impersonally. (Ch. 3)

When Pony meets a Soc girl, Cherry, at the movies, he is surprised to learn that Socs do have feelings buried deep inside.  They do have problems too, although Pony laughs them off.  He feels like the Socs’ problems are minor compared to the greasers’.  All in all, what he learns from the experience is a little empathy for Socs, and an awareness that they are not all the same, and there might be an opportunity to end the cycle of fighting because some of them are as tired of it as the greasers are.  Of course, it will take quite a lot for that to happen, if it ever does. 

Pony is different from most greasers.  He is more reflective, and more introspective.  Even if the endless cycle of rumbles continues, he has the opportunity to use his intelligence and compassion to get out.

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What are the differences and similarities between the Socs and Greasers in The Outsiders?

The Socs and Greasers both come from different social classes and tend to have different personalities and values. Members of the Socs come from wealthy families and enjoy special privileges. Since they drive nice cars and wear new clothes, they are viewed as more socially acceptable members of society when compared to the Greasers. Cherry also tells Ponyboy that most of the Socs are superficial and act too cool. The Greasers come from a lower social class and have a bad reputation throughout their community. The majority of Greasers come from broken homes and do not hide their emotions. They are more supportive of each other when compared to the Socs, and are a closer group of friends. Neither gang is "right" because both the Socs and Greasers attempt to solve their differences through violence. However, there are sensitive, thoughtful characters in both groups who denounce fighting. Hinton sympathizes with the Greaser gang more throughout the novel and several characters from the Greaser gang could be considered heroes. Johnny and Ponyboy save the lives of the children in the burning church, Johnny then saves Pony's life by pushing him out of the building, and Dally saves Johnny's life by dragging him out of the fire. Each of those characters could be considered heroes and they all are members of the Greaser gang.

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What are the differences and similarities between the Socs and Greasers in The Outsiders?

The basic difference is economic, the socs being the teenage children of more upper-class parents and the greasers being from the classic "wrong side of the tracks."  The differences are highlighted by their modes of dress and the cars they drive, the kinds of jobs they and their parents have, the very fact that some of the greasers have to work while the socs are never mentioned as having jobs themselves.  Ponyboy's family and his closest friend are the epitome of this, one from a family where everyone but the youngest works and the other a young teenager from a classically disadvantaged and "low class" family.

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What are four similarities between the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders?

I would argue that the most significant similarity between the Socs and the greasers is that they are both gangs. As such, members of both groups appreciate the value of loyalty, protection, and camaraderie. Members of both gangs are fiercely loyal to each other.

Secondly, it is worth pointing out that both Socs and greasers are around the same age. Many Socs and greasers would probably be surprised if they stopped to think about how much they have in common. The presence of both Socs and greasers at the drive-in theater shows that they have similar interests in terms of popular culture, although it is pointed out that the two groups have differing opinions on the Beatles and Elvis.

Third, both groups are prone to being on the giving and receiving end of violence. Ponyboy recalls an incident some months earlier when Johnny had been severely beaten up and threatened by Socs, leaving him in a state of terror. Another example can be seen right at the beginning of the novel, when the Socs come for Ponyboy as he is walking home from a movie. The greasers are far from above beating up a Soc, and from the greasers’ side, we are told early on that “Dally had jumped people.” This refers to the greasers’ propensity for violence.

The last similarity I will mention is that members of both groups appear to come from unstable home environments. While Ponyboy’s parents are dead, Johnny’s largely ignore him. Poor parenting is also seen on the Soc’s side, and Bob Sheldon’s parents are a great example of this. They have failed to ever discipline their son, give him any boundaries or make him account for his actions.

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What are four similarities between the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders?

One similarity between the Socials (the Socs) and the greasers is that they both stick to a singular uniform. Each group has a certain look and style that the members of that respective group follow. When it comes to the greasers, they have long hair. They dress in blue jeans, T-shirts, leather jackets, and either boots or tennis shoes. The Socs sport “semi-Beatle haircuts” and a clean-shaven look. They wear madras, formal shirts, and nice jackets.

Another similarity between the Socs and the greasers is their penchant to define themselves by socioeconomic class. Within the first few pages, Ponyboy points out that the greasers don’t have as much money as the Socs. He says they’re below the middle class. The Socs, too, are defined by their economic situation. Ponyboy describes the Socs as “the West-side rich kids.” He reinforces the relative affluence of the Socs by noting the kind of cars that they drive.

For two more similarities between the Socs and the greasers, think about how both groups exhibit a willingness to fight and engage in deleterious behavior. Furthermore, consider how each group contains members that could be called sensitive or empathetic. The conversation between Randy and Ponyboy at the end of chapter 7 supports the argument that both factions have boys in them who understand that their feud ultimately doesn’t benefit anyone in either party.

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What are four similarities between the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders?

Let's look at the opposition first. The difference between Socs and Greasers is outlined for the reader in the opening chapter by Ponyboy, who is himself a Greaser and thus is able to give an excellent breakdown of what turns one young person into a Soc and another into a Greaser. Note what Ponyboy says:

We're poorer than the Socs and the middle class. I reckon we're wilder, too. Not like the Socs... Greasers are almost like hoods; we steal things and drive old souped-up cars and hold up gas stations and have a gang fight once in a while.

Primarily, therefore, the difference between these two groups is one of class. Ponyboy states that the Greasers are working class, as they are poorer than the Socs. However, in addition, they are much wilder than the Socs, who get into trouble doing frivolous things like "jumping greasers" and wrecking houses when they have a party. This is compared to the Greasers who are more like "hoods" through the illegal activity they engage in. Another difference is the way that these two groups are regarded by society. The press seems to regard Socs as "a public disgrace one day and an asset to society the next," whereas Greasers are largely condemned unrelentingly by society. Lastly, there is a difference in dress. Greasers wear their hair long and also wear leather jackets. These are some of the crucial differences between Socs and Greasers that are introduced in the first chapter.

In regards to your main question, there are of course many similarities between these two groups that are so opposed. Indeed, one of the reasons why this book seems to have been written was to show that differences between Socs and Greasers are artificial, and that actually, underneath those terms, exist young people who are just the same as each other, whether they are Socs or Greasers. One of the ways in which this is conveyed is through the shared interests that both groups have. Both groups like movies and also have a tendency to fight between each other. Both groups too have similar challenges, even though the precise nature of those challenges might be different. Note, for example, what Cherry says to Ponyboy:

I'll bet you think the Socs have it made. The rich kids, the West-side Socs. I'll tell you something, Ponyboy, and it may come as a surprise. We have troubles you've never even heard of. You want to know something? ... Things are rough all over.

This helps Ponyboy to break down the barriers that he feels divide Socs and Greasers and to see them all as young people trying to survive and thrive in difficult situations. Lastly, and linked to the last point, both Socs and Greasers have the capacity to see sunsets and admire and appreciate their beauty. The ability to see sunsets is something of a motif in the story, as it is something that Johnny writes in his final letter as he tells Ponyboy to keep on looking at sunsets. It stands for the capacity to see beauty and to not let the bitterness of life overcome you.

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What are four similarities between the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders?

The Greasers and Socs are both local gangs consisting of juvenile delinquents who participate in illegal activities and often fight with each other. The Greasers and Socs are both notorious throughout the town and occupy their own territories—where they live and where they hang out. Members of both gangs also enjoy being intoxicated, starting fights, and causing trouble. Although both gangs consist of tough, criminal-minded adolescents, both groups do include sensitive, morally-upright members like Ponyboy and Cherry Valance. Members of both gangs also deal with personal issues and experience their own types of problems.

Despite the many similarities, the Greasers and Socs occupy different social classes and have different reputations among the local authorities. The Greasers reside on the poorer East Side and come from broken homes. They are not as affluent as the Soc members and get a bad reputation among local police. In contrast, the Socs reside in the affluent West Side and have all the opportunities and advantages that the Greasers do not have. The Greasers are also a more close-knit group of friends who are depicted as selfless, compassionate individuals. In contrast, the Socs are portrayed as aloof and callous toward each other.

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What are four similarities between the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders?

Superficially, the greasers and the Socs seem completely different; for example, Ponyboy describes greasers as poorer than the Socs and less likely to conform to societal expectations. As the plot of The Outsiders progresses, however, it becomes clear to Ponyboy, and to the reader, that the greasers and the Socs have much more in common than Ponyboy first thought.

The connection between Cherry Valance and Ponyboy that enables them to talk openly about themselves best illustrates the similarities between greasers and Socs. She talks of the tendency of the Socs to put forth an image of aloofness, while Ponyboy talks of the passionate nature of greasers; though aloofness and passion seem to be opposites, they are simply two different ways of experiencing strong emotion. Members of both groups experience strong emotions like love and hate, rage and excitement, but the Socs feel the need to hide it, while the greasers feel the need to act on it. As well, members of both groups feel grief when they lose one of their own, and they feel vindication when they avenge that loss.

Later in the novel, when Cherry acknowledges with Ponyboy that the sunset seen from the West side is just as beautiful as the sunset seen from the East, they share a moment of recognition. This recognition of the similarities between the greasers and the Socs is poignant; though Cherry and Ponyboy understand that they have more in common than meets the eye, that recognition is not enough to prevent more deaths and more conflict between the greasers and the Socs.

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What are four similarities between the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders?

Despite their many differences, the Greasers and Socs have several things in common that surprise Ponyboy as he develops into a mature, understanding individual. After Ponyboy has an enlightening conversation with Cherry, he discovers that the Socs have struggles and realizes that everything is not always perfect in their world. Cherry explains to Ponyboy that the Socs have difficulty expressing their true feelings and suffer from constantly having to maintain appearances. Similarly, the Greasers also have difficulties in their lives, which focus more on financial instability and growing up in dysfunctional homes. Both the Greasers and Socs also have family issues. Randy Adderson tells Pony that Bob Sheldon struggled to find someone who would tell him "No," and Johnny's issues involving his parents are illustrated. Both gangs also enjoy thrilling experiences, fighting, and breaking the law. Also, the Greasers and Socs both consist of adolescents who make questionable decisions and are well known throughout their respective communities.

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What are four similarities between the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders?

At the beginning of Chapter 3, Pony says that the two types of people are essentially the same, down deep.  But all he really talks about is how they are different.  He and Cherry decide that they are different because the Greasers let their real selves show and the Socs keep things bottled up.  But we're not really told why they're similar.

To me, what makes them similar is that they are both groups of teens who are somehow trying to figure out a way to deal with what society thinks of them and expects of them.  The Socs have to deal with the expectations that come with being rich.  The Greasers have to deal with people thinking they are thugs.  But both groups are really trying to figure out how to be themselves.

I think that's a lot of what this book is about -- teens trying to be themselves while dealing with what society thinks they are and what society tries to push them to be.  Both the Greasers and the Socs have to deal with that.

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Are the Socs more of a disgrace and menace to society than the Greasers in The Outsiders?

The Socs’s actions are more accepted by society because they come from wealthy families. In general, the actions of the Socs and greasers are the same.  They are kids who fight each other and sometimes commit acts of vandalism or pretty crime.  The Socs do this for fun, while the greasers often act out of need or anger. 

Pony explains the difference between the Socs and the greasers.

We're poorer than the Socs and the middle class. I reckon we're wilder, too. Not like the Socs, who jump greasers and wreck houses and throw beer blasts for kicks, and get editorials in the paper for being a public disgrace one day and an asset to society the next. (Ch. 1) 

It seems clear that while greasers may steal things and “hold up gas stations,” their main issue is that they are poor.  They do not have many options in life.  The Socs have greater access to opportunities.  Society accepts their youthful indiscretions, and then they go off to college and become upstanding citizens. 

It is apparent that the Socs target the greasers.  Pony is afraid of them.  He feels that he is in danger, and needs the other greasers to protect him. 

Greasers can't walk alone too much or they'll get jumped, or someone will come by and scream "Greaser!" at them, which doesn't make you feel too hot, if you know what I mean. We get jumped by the Socs. (Ch. 1) 

When Cherry and Pony are talking, she tells him that Socs have problems too.  “Things are rough all over.”  Some of the Socs’s problems just come from having money.  An example is Bob, whose parents are over-indulgent and let him drink and cause trouble.  He never had any boundaries, and it is a significant cause of his death.  His parents were not aware enough or strong enough to stop him.

Thus, the public perception that greasers are the problem is really just prejudice.  The two groups are always fighting each other, which is a never-ending cycle.  Neither one is singularly to blame.

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Are the Socs more of a disgrace and menace to society than the Greasers in The Outsiders?

The Socs are a wealthy group of teenagers who come from affluent families and are given special treatment by the authorities because of their upper-class social status. The Socs wear expensive clothing and drive fancy cars, which makes them appear sophisticated and respectable. However, they are actually entitled teenagers who have little respect for their community and engage in reckless behavior. Ponyboy mentions that the Socs continually throw beer blasts and jump Greasers for fun. According to Ponyboy, the Socs initiate most of the violence by driving around at night looking for Greasers to beat up. In the novel, Johnny and Ponyboy both are jumped by multiple Socs. While the Greasers also engage in criminal behavior, one could argue that the Socs are more of a disgrace and menace to society, because their behavior is unprovoked and unwarranted. They do not live in dangerous communities or lack any material objects, yet choose to cause trouble. At the beginning of the novel, Pony mentions that the Socs are praised in editorials one day for being assets to society and are criticized the next for being a disgrace.

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Are the Socs more of a disgrace and menace to society than the Greasers in The Outsiders?

Although both groups of boys spend most of their free hours breaking the law and engaging in gang fights, it is the Socs' wealth and higher social standing that is most infuriating. Unlike the greasers, who live on the wrong side of the tracks, are mostly poor, and come from broken homes, the Socs have everything going for them. They mostly come from two-parent homes, drive nice cars, wear fashionable clothes, and are given the freedom of which teens can only dream. Yet the Socs focus much of their attentions on their hatred of the greasers, jumping them in larger numbers and cruising through the greasers' neighborhoods hoping to cause trouble. According to Cherry, the Socs are cold and detached--"sophisticated--cool to the point of not feeling anything."

"Did you ever hear of having more than you wanted? So that you couldn't want anything else and then started looking for something else to want?  (Chapter 3)

The Socs "don't feel anything and we feel too violently." Instead of taking advantage of their good fortune, the Socs "get editorials in the paper for being a public disgrace one day and an asset to society the next." Only Randy and Cherry seem to recognize the error of their ways: Cherry sympathizes with the greasers even after her boyfriend, Bob, is killed, while Randy decides to skip the rumble and suffer the scorn he knows will come from his friends. (In a later S. E. Hinton novel, Randy turns up as a peace-loving hippie, abandoning his Soc roots.)

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Are the Socs more of a disgrace and menace to society than the Greasers in The Outsiders?

The Socs had all of the necessities of life as well as the extras such as nice cars extra money and lived in the "good" part of town. The Socs boys harrassed the Greaser boys just for kicks.  Often they went too far in their bullying.

The Socs already had status in the community and did not need to gain status by beating up on the Greasers.  They just did this because they knew they could get away with it because their parents would bail them out or pay off the judge.

The Greasers were just trying to survive, and the Socs were flaunting their material possessions, their status and their immunity to the law when they started fights with the greasers. They had no sense of justice or fairness

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Are the Socs more of a disgrace and menace to society than the Greasers in The Outsiders?

According to Ponyboy, the Socs "get editorials in the paper for being a public disgrace one day and an asset to society the next" (3).  His characterization of that particular social group of kids rings true as the events of The Outsiders reveal that the Socs are dangerous.

1.  The Socs are bullies.

Several times throughout the novel, the Socs target and pick on boys who are smaller than them and do so in greater numbers.  At the beginning of the novel when Ponyboy walks home from the movie, the Socs actually stop and unload their car to jump him.  Johnny's severe beating is another good example of how the Socs target weaker victims.

2. The Socs act out of boredom.

The Socs target and beat up on the greasers because they do not have enough to do, or like Bob, they are pushing the limits to see what they can get away with. 

3.  Difference in Socio-economic status.

The Socs could be using their economic status to help make a difference.  They could volunteer and perform community service, since they do not have to work to support their family, like Darry and other greaser boys.  Instead, the Socs come across in the novel as self-centered, using their power for evil, rather than good.

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Why do the Socs in The Outsiders seem unfeeling compared to the emotionally intense Greasers?

Cherry and Ponyboy talk about the differences between the Socs and the Greasers at one point, only to figure out there may not be so many differences between them deep down.

Cherry explains that the Socs appear aloof and cold-hearted because they are suppressing their own emotions on purpose. They do not want to appear vulnerable and like to seem cool. On the other hand, the Greasers take things way too seriously and give into their emotions too easily. They are oversensitive.

So, both groups go for different types of behavior and public images, but beneath these personas, they might not be as different as they think. Ponyboy is surprised that it isn't so hard to talk with Cherry. He even observes that though they come from different groups, they watch the same sunset, an observation that signifies the shared humanity between them. Even if the Greasers seem like brutes, there is more to them than meets the eye, at least in some cases. It's the same with the Socs, who seem snobby and cold, but as with Cherry, there is more to them, too.

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Why do the Socs in The Outsiders seem unfeeling compared to the emotionally intense Greasers?

In chapter three, Pony has an enlightening conversation with Cherry Valance, and she explains to him the primary differences between their social groups. Cherry goes on to tell Pony that being a Soc is like participating in one big rat race where everyone is competing against each other. Cherry mentions that the Socs are aloof and distant. She comments that they are more interested in looking cool and fail to have genuine relationships with each other.

Cherry also tells Pony that Greasers are more emotional and the Socs act too sophisticated to feel anything. In Cherry's opinion, the Socs have more than enough and refuse to lose their cool out of fear that expressing their genuine emotions would harm their reputations. After contemplating Cherry's comments, Pony agrees and is aware that the Socs hide "behind a wall of aloofness." Pony finally understands what truly separates the Socs from the Greasers and concludes,

It's not money, it's feeling—you don't feel anything and we feel too violently. (Hinton, 34)

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What two differences between the Socs and the Greasers does Ponyboy identify in The Outsiders?

If you read the first chapter carefully, which acts as a kind of introduction to the world of this novel and the way that it is sharply delineated between the two sides, you will see that Ponyboy gives us a clear description of the Socs and Greasers and the characteristics that each group possesses. Note what Ponyboy says:

We're poorer than the Socs and the middle class. I reckon we're wilder, too. Not like the Socs, who jump greasers and wreck houses and throw beer blasts for kicks, and get editorials in the paper for being a public disgrace one day and an asset to society the next. Greasers are almost like hoods; we steal things and drive old souped-up cars and hold up gas stations and have a gang fight once in a while.

So, if we examine this quote, it is clear that the two central differences between the Socs and the Greasers, according to Ponyboy at least, are the way in which the Socs are richer and occupy a higher social class than the Greasers, who are poor and working class, and the exact nature of their delinquency, which, according to Ponyboy, is just trivial on the part of the Socs but slightly more serious when we consider the Greasers.

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What is the greatest difference between the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton?

The Socs, which stands for the "Socials," are rich kids from the West Side, while the Greasers are poor kids from the East Side. The Greasers are also wilder than the Socs. The Socs commit rich kid crimes like having beer parties and jumping Greasers. On the other hand, Greasers steal things and rob gas stations.

In addition, the Socs fight for different reasons than the Greasers do--the Socs seem to fight out of a sense of boredom or ennui. They wear madras and have fancy cars like Corvairs and Mustangs. They have parties and fight each other for kicks, but it's clear that they will still have cushy lives. The Greasers, on the other hand, fight because they need to stick together and their lives are difficult. Many of them have families in which the parents are dead or abusive, and the Greasers regard each other almost as family members. They fight to blow off steam and because the Socs often jump them. 

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What is the greatest difference between the Socs and the Greasers in The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton?

To me, the major difference between these groups is in how society sees them.  They are both pretty similar, with teens who have problems and who often turn to violence and gangs to make themselves feel like they are wanted and cared for.

But the greasers are looked down on by much of society.  They are seen as the lowlife kids.  Meanwhile, the Socs are much more respected because they have money and important parents.  Things that they do do not seem like such a big deal to the community because there is this assumption that they are basically okay where the greasers are basically punks.

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What is the behavior and "code" of the Socs and Greasers in The Outsiders?

The Socs are superficial, privileged individuals who enjoy their material possessions and like to have parties. They also enjoy fighting the Greasers and picking on kids who are not wealthy. Cherry mentions to Pony that the Socs are pretentious and fake. Socs are more concerned with their appearance and status than they are with developing authentic relationships. Similar to the Greasers, their "code" would be to stick up for one another. For example, the Socs are quick to retaliate after Bob Sheldon is murdered and seek to avenge his death.

The Greaser gang consists of troubled youths who have difficult home lives. They enjoy hanging out, committing petty crimes, and fighting Socs. They are extremely loyal to one another and selflessly help each other when they are in difficult situations. Darry gives them a place to stay if any of them get kicked out of their homes, and each member is willing to fight in order to protect another Greaser. Unlike the Socs, the Greasers have authentic relationships and value each other on an individual level.

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What is the behavior and "code" of the Socs and Greasers in The Outsiders?

In my opinion, both of these gangs have a similar code.  Their code is that they stick together and protect one another from anything that is not part of their gang.  They both serve as family for their members.

You can say that the Socs act more aggressively than the Greasers.  They seem to be the ones who go out looking for trouble.  But this may just be because it is a Greaser who is telling the story.  Clearly, the Socs try to protect each other, like when a group of them wants to fight Pony because he was involved in killing Bob.

The Greasers also stick together and protect each other.  You can see examples in the time that they save Pony from the Socs and when Dally helps Pony and Johnny get away after they kill Bob.

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