Bibliography

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Last Updated on May 5, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 258

Brann, Eva. Homeric Moments: Clues to Delight in Reading the “Odyssey” and the “Iliad.” Philadelphia: Paul Dry, 2002. A close and witty exploration of the experience of reading Homer.

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Camps, W. A. An Introduction to Homer. Oxford, England: Clarendon Press, 1980. Excellent source for beginners. Provides an introductory essay that compares The Odyssey with the Iliad. Includes extensive notes and appendices to each work.

Gaunt, D. M., trans. Surge and Thunder: Critical Reading in Homer’s “Odyssey.” London: Oxford University Press, 1971. Designed for general readers. Gaunt translates selected passages, explaining fine points of language and meaning that are lost in translation. Text includes explication, analysis, and discussion. Has a guide to pronunciation, a list of Greek proper nouns, and an index of literary topics.

Lamberton, Robert. Homer the Theologian: Neoplatonist Allegorical Reading and the Growth of the Epic Tradition. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1986. Addresses The Odyssey as allegory, presenting a commentary and summary of the work. Supports points with material from Greek scholars. General researchers will find particularly interesting its focus on Homer as theologian. Well-indexed, well-documented, scholarly.

Mason, H. A. To Homer Through Pope: An Introduction to Homer’s “Iliad” and Pope’s Translation. London: Chatto and Windus, 1972. Mason devotes last chapter to The Odyssey and major translators of that work. Not recommended for beginning researchers.

Taylor, Charles H., Jr. Essays on the “Odyssey”: Selected Modern Criticism. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1963. Seven selected essays, arranged chronologically. Taylor contends that interest grew in the “emblematic or symbolic implications” at work in events and images in the poem. Extensive notes.

Bibliography

Download PDF Print Page Citation Share Link

Last Updated on May 5, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 292

Brann, Eva. Homeric Moments: Clues to Delight in Reading the “Odyssey” and the “Iliad.” Philadelphia: Paul Dry, 2002. A close and witty exploration of the experience of reading Homer.

Camps, W. A. An Introduction to Homer. Oxford, England: Clarendon Press, 1980. Excellent source for beginners. Provides an introductory essay that compares The Odyssey with the Iliad. Includes extensive notes and appendices to each work.

Dalby, Andrew. Rediscovering Homer: Inside the Origins of the Epic. New York: W. W. NOrton, 2006. Dalby explores the historical development of written poetry and examines the debate regarding the authorship of Homer’s epics.

Gaunt, D. M., trans. Surge and Thunder: Critical Reading in Homer’s “Odyssey.” London: Oxford University Press, 1971. Designed for general readers. Gaunt translates selected passages, explaining fine points of language and meaning that are lost in translation. Text includes explication, analysis, and discussion. Has a guide to pronunciation, a list of Greek proper nouns, and an index of literary topics.

Lamberton, Robert. Homer the Theologian: Neoplatonist Allegorical Reading and the Growth of the Epic Tradition. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1986. Addresses The Odyssey as allegory, presenting a commentary and summary of the work. Supports points with material from Greek scholars. General researchers will find particularly interesting its focus on Homer as theologian. Well-indexed, well-documented, scholarly.

Mason, H. A. To Homer Through Pope: An Introduction to Homer’s “Iliad” and Pope’s Translation. London: Chatto and Windus, 1972. Mason devotes last chapter to The Odyssey and major translators of that work. Not recommended for beginning researchers.

Taylor, Charles H., Jr. Essays on the “Odyssey”: Selected Modern Criticism. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1963. Seven selected essays, arranged chronologically. Taylor contends that interest grew in the “emblematic or symbolic implications” at work in events and images in the poem. Extensive notes.

Bibliography and Further Reading

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Last Updated on June 24, 2020, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 895

Sources

Some quotations of the Odyssey are taken from the following translation:

Homer. The Odyssey of Homer. Translated by Richmond Lattimore. New York: Harper & Row, 1975. In addition, Lattimore’s introduction was indispensable to this study.

Aurbach, Erich. Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature. Translated by Willard R. Trask. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1953.

Camps, W. A. An Introduction to Homer. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1980.

Lord, Albert B. The Singer of Tales. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1964.

Scott, John A. The Unity of Homer (Sather Classical Lectures). Berkeley: The University of California Press, 1921.

Tillyard, E. M. W. The English Epic and its Background. New York: Barnes & Noble, Inc., 1954.

Sources for Further Study

Biers, William R. The Archaeology of Greece: An Introduction. Cornell University Press, 1980. A good basic introduction to Greek archaeology. Many illustrations.

Camps, William A. An Introduction to Homer. Oxford University Press, 1980. A good overview of Homer and his work, not too technical, and with notes on important points in both poems.

Easterling, P. E., and B. M. W. Knox, eds. The Cambridge History of Classical Literature, Vol. 1, Part 1, "Early Greek Poetry." Cambridge University Press, 1989. A brief, though somewhat technical, overview of the earliest Greek writers to have survived. This volume is the first in a series by Cambridge that covers the whole history of Greek literature through the Hellenistic period and into the empire.

Griffin, Jasper. Homer: The Odyssey (Landmarks of World Literature series). Cambridge University Press, 1987. A convenient, affordable, pocket-sized overview of the work and its author.

Hammond, N. G. L. A History of Greece to 322 BC, 3d ed. Oxford University Press, 1986. The "standard" history of Greece before the time of Alexander. The print is small and the text fairly dense, but it remains a worthwhile resource to consult.

Harvey, Paul, ed. The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature. Oxford University Press, 1984. A very useful ready-reference tool for basic facts, names, and dates.

Herodotus. The Persian Wars. Translated by George Rawlinson; introduction by Francis R. B. Godolphin. Modern Library, 1942. Although not very recent, among the best translations of Herodotus. Although he was technically writing about the war between the Greeks and the Persians, as he is discussing the origins of the war Herodotus covers quite a lot of other ground, and offers some fascinating (and often fanciful) historical details, including several references to Homer and his works.

Homer. The Odyssey of Homer. Translated by Richmond Lattimore. Harper & Row, 1967. Lattimore's translation reproduces Homer's original line structure much better than any other verse translation, yet without sacrificing either the ease of reading or the flow of the translation.

———. The Odyssey of Homer, 2nd ed. Edited, with general and grammatical introduction, commentary, and indexes, by W. B. Stanford. Macmillan, 1974. A very good edition, with technical commentary, of the Greek original.

———. The Odyssey. Translated by Robert Fitzgerald. Anchor, 1963; reissued by Vintage Books, 1990. A rather loose verse translation of the poem. Some readers may find Fitzgerald's direct transliteration of the Greek names confusing.

———. The Odyssey. Translated by Robert Fagles; introduction and notes by Bernard Knox. Viking, 1996. Perhaps the most recent and certainly one of the more critically acclaimed translations of the Odyssey, Fagles offers a rendition in blank verse that is somewhat more free than Lattimore's or Fitzgerald's translations, but without diluting the poetic character of the epic. Knox's introduction is well written and very informative.

Homeri Opera, Vols. III and IV, 2nd ed. Edited by Thomas W. Allen. Oxford University Press, 1919. The standard edition of the original Greek text.

Internet Movie Database, The. (http://us.imdb.com). An exhaustive listing of movie and television productions from the 1890s to the present, with extensive search capabilities.

Jones, Peter V. Introduction. The Odyssey. Translated by E. V. Rieu. Penguin Classics, 1946, 1991. A good, broad-based introduction to the poem that does not require a knowledge of Greek. An excellent resource for finding textual references to various people and places named in the poem, and a good bibliography of further reading material.

Knox, Bernard, ed. The Norton Book of Classical Literature. W. W. Norton, 1993. More a book of selected passages from famous works of classical literature, it nevertheless contains some basic information about the authors and works it discusses.

Levi, Peter. The Pelican History of Greek Literature. Penguin, 1985. A good basic reference for Greek literature generally, and one that does not require a knowledge of Greek.

Perseus Project, The. (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/). An extensive online reference source for primary and secondary source materials in both Greek and English, standard reference works, etc. Invaluable for tracing down references to characters in secondary sources, and much quicker for determining the frequency of word usage, etc.

Reynolds, L. D., and N. G. Wilson. Scribes and Scholars: A Guide to the Transmission of Greek and Latin Literature, 2nd ed. Oxford University Press, 1974. A rather technical work dealing with books and the "book trade" in antiquity, and the process by which ancient texts have come down to us from the classical world.

Solomon, Jon D. "In the Wake of Cleopatra: The Ancient World in the Cinema Since 1963." Classical Journal, Vol. 91, no. 2, 1996, pp. 113-40. A chronology with basic information on film and television productions which are based on or which mention works from classical antiquity.

Thucydides. The Peloponnesian War. Translated by Richard Crawley; revised with introduction by T. E. Wick. Modern Library, 1982. One of the best translations of Thucydides into English, even given its age. Very readable.

Media Adaptations

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Last Updated on June 1, 2019, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 522

  • There have been several film and television productions based wholly or in part on the Odyssey, beginning in 1954 with the Dino De Laurentiis production of Ulisse (released in English as Ulysses in the same year), directed by Mario Camerini and starring Kirk Douglas as Ulysses and Anthony Quinn as Antinoos. In 1963, Pietro Francisi directed the film Ercole sfida Sansone, released in 1965 in the United States as Hercules, Samson, and Ulysses. A 1967 British production of Ulysses, based on the 1922 James Joyce novel which was itself based in part on the Odyssey, starred Martin Dempsey and Barbara Jefford. Radiotelevisione Italiana (RTI) produced a television version of the poem in 1969, directed by Mario Bara and Franco Rossi. NBC television produced a two-part miniseries of the epic in May of 1997, starring Armand Assante, Isabella Rosselini, Vanessa Williams, and Irene Pappas.
  • The British rock band Cream, made up of Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce, and Ginger Baker, recorded the song "Tales of Brave Ulysses" on their second album, Disraeli Gears, in 1967. The song includes characters, themes, and motifs from the epic.
  • There is at least a symbolic link between Homer's poem and the classic 1968 MGM production 2001: A Space Odyssey, directed by Stanley Kubrick and starring Keir Dullea, beginning with the title of the movie. Kubrick's film, although based on a 1950 novel by Arthur C. Clarke does seem to ask at least some of the same questions about human nature and its meaning as Homer does in the Odyssey.
  • Elements from the Odyssey have received at least two (widely separated) operatic treatments. The first was in 1641 when Claudio Monteverdi (1567-1643) composed II Ritorno d'Ulisse in Patria ("The Return of Ulysses"), treating Odysseus's return to Ithaca after his wanderings. The second is Richard Strauss's (1864-1949) Die agyptische Helena in 1928, with a libretto by the Austrian poet Hugo von Hofmannsthal based on the account of Helen's visit to Egypt in Book 4 of the Odyssey.
  • Princeton University is host to a World Wide Web site entitled "The Odysseus Page" (http://www.princeton.edu/~cdmoen/). The site discusses the various encounters Odysseus experiences in his wanderings, and includes quotes from the Odyssey, links to images of some of the places and things mentioned in the poem, and some brief commentary. The Perseus Project at Tufts University (http://www.perseus.tufts. edu/), which is also available on CD-ROM for Mac from Yale University Press with a Windows version in the works, offers both the original Greek text and the Loeb Classical Library translation in English (which is, unfortunately, written in a highly artificial style and not recommended for use except as a reference), together with background information on many of the characters and places in the poem. Alan Liu's "Voice of the Shuttle" classical studies page (http://humanitas.ucsb.edu/shuttle/classics.html) is a good place to start looking for information and links to other sites relevant to the classics and classical literature.
  • Audio cassette versions of the Odyssey are available from Dove Audio (1996), Penguin Highbridge Audio (two versions, both dated 1996: the Fagles translation, narrated by Sir Ian McKellen, and Allen Mandelbaum's translation), and Harper Audio (1996, the Lattimore translation, narrated by Anthony Quayle).

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