Notes From Underground Questions and Answers Part II: On the Occasion of Wet Snow (Chapters 6−10)

Fyodor Dostoevsky

Questions and Answers Part II: On the Occasion of Wet Snow (Chapters 6−10)

Questions
1. When the narrator says that he does not believe that Liza chose the house of prostitution of her own free will, what does Liza answer? After the narrator hears her answer, what does he say?

2. The narrator attempts to contrast life as Liza is currently living and the life she has forsaken because she has turned to prostitution. What does he tell her he would do if she were not a prostitute? What does he say he can do with her because she is a prostitute? And what does he say she has given up because she is a prostitute?

3. Before the narrator leaves the house of prostitution, Liza asks him to wait. She wants to give him something. What is it that she gives him? And what comment does the narrator make about why Liza gave it to him?

4. There is an exchange between Apollon and the narrator over Apollon’s wages. What does the narrator do? How does Apollon react?

5. Toward the end of the story, the narrator has a sort of revelation in reference to Liza. He sees something in her that he has never seen before in anyone else. What is it?

Answers
1. Liza insinuates that her father sold her to the house of prostitution. The narrator tells her that that only happens when there is no God and no love in the family. This is what poverty can do to families, he concludes.

2. The narrator tells Liza that if she were living somewhere else, some place respectable, he might fall in love with her. But as she lives now, all he has to do is call to her, and she has to do whatever he asks of her. It is not just her body that is not free. She has sold her soul. She has given up on love.

3. Liza shows the narrator a letter. It is from a college boy who declares his love for her. The narrator leaves, thinking that Liza showed him that letter to prove her worth.

4. In order to annoy Apollon, the narrator decides to withhold his...

(The entire section is 533 words.)