Nineteenth-Century Women's Autobiography Further Reading - Essay

Further Reading

(Nineteenth-Century Literary Criticism)

Couser, G. Thomas. "Mary Boykin Chesnut: Secession, Confederacy, Reconstruction." In Altered Egos: Authority in American Autobiography, pp. 156-88. New York: Oxford University Press, 1989.

Considers the issues of authenticity and validity in the case of Mary Boykin Chesnut's Civil War diary.

Dodson, Jualynne E. Introduction to An Autobiography: The Story of the Lord's Dealings with Mrs. Amanda Smith the Colored Evangelist, by Amanda Smith, pp. xxvii-xlii. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.

Argues that Smith's An Autobiography provides unique insight into African-American women's roles in the AME Church and Christian Evangelism.

Jelinek, Estelle "The Paradox and Success of Elizabeth Cady Stanton." In Women's Autobiography: Essays in Criticism, edited by Estelle Jelinek, pp. 71-92. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1980.

Explores Stanton's effort to present an ordinary but positive life-story in order to attract readers to her cause.

Myers, Mitzi. "Harriet Martineau's Autobiography: The Making of a Female Philosopher." In Women's Autobiography: Essays in Criticism, edited by Estelle Jelinek, pp. 53-70. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1980.

Describes Harriet Martineau's Autobiography as a study of the development of the philosopher's mind.

Ridgers, Brian. "'What I earnestly longed for…': Elizabeth Missing Sewell, Writing, Autobiography and Victorian Womanhood." In The Uses of Autobiography, edited by Julia Swindells, pp. 138-50. London: Taylor and Francis, 1995.

Discusses the defining elements of women's Victorian autobiographies.

Smith, Sidonie. "Resisting the Gaze of Embodiment: Women's Autobiography in the Nineteenth Century." In American Women's Autobiography: Fea(s)ts of Memory, edited by Margo Culley, pp. 75-110. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1992.

Argues that nineteenth-century autobiographies reflect the formation of female selfhood.

Symes, Ruth A. "Catharine Cappe of York (1822)." In The Uses of Autobiography, edited by Julia Swindells, pp. 128-37. London: Taylor and Francis, 1995.

Contends that there is a strong connection, which has yet to be explored, between educational writing and autobiography in the early nineteenth century.

Washington, Mary Helen. An Introduction to A Voice from the South, by Anna Julia Cooper, pp. xxvii-liv. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.

States that African-American women's autobiographies not only challenged white supremacy but also criticized gender relations within the African-American community.