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How does the hanging of the "angelic Pipel" symbolize the loss of faith in Night?

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The slow, agonizing death of the little boy symbolizes the final death of innocence in the camp and, with it, Eliezer's already wavering faith. That the young pipel had such an angelic face is significant in this regard. The prisoners had become almost numb to the daily diet of horrors served up to them by their Nazi captors, but the death of a small child—and such a gentle, angelic-looking child—is a different matter entirely. For if God cannot intervene to save the life of such a frail, innocent creature, then what hope is there for the rest of the prisoners? Eliezer concludes that there is none; God has abandoned his chosen people in their hour of darkness and the Angel of Death is triumphant.

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But the third rope was still moving: the child, too light, was still breathing....And so he remained for more than half an hour, lingering between life and death, writhing before our eyes....Behind me, I heard the same man asking:  'For God's sake, where is God?"  --Night, Page 65

This is a very important passage in detailing Elie Wiesel's abandonment of his faith.  If there is a God, how could he allow children to be hanged to die.  How could he allow such cruelty and barbarity as what was happening in the concentration camps to the Jews?  An important theme in the book is the loss of faith that even the most devout Jews experienced.  At the beginning of the memoir Wiesel was very dedicated to learning about his religion and God. It did not take long for disillusionment to set in for Eliezer.  This loss of faith is another unjust consequence that many Jews were met with because of their brutal treatment.  According to Wiesel, the boy hanging from the gallows, struggling to survive was, in fact, symbolic of God and religion.  

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