In Night, how did Eliezer evolve from a boy to a man?

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One way that Eliezer changes from a boy to a man is seen in his relationship with his father. 

At the start of the narrative, Eliezer has a traditional relationship with his father. Chlomo is a community leader and businessman.  He wields power in so far as he finds out information before it is made public.  When both Eliezer and his father are moved into one line in their first concentration camp, Eliezer is dependent on his father.  

However, as their time in the camps increase, Eliezer becomes more independent.  He learns how to survive and what to do in order to endure. Eliezer also must take care of his father. For example, he negotiates for additional rations and teaches him how to march properly so he will not be abused.  Towards the end of the narrative, Eliezer is told the harsh truth that fully displays his maturation:

Listen to me, kid. Don't forget that you are in a concentration camp. In this place, it is every man for himself, and you cannot think of others. Not even your father. In this place, there is no such thing as father, brother, friend. Each of us lives and dies alone... stop giving your ration of bread and soup to your old father. You cannot help him anymore.

Chlomo's condition weakens while he is in the camps.  At one point, Eliezer is forced to see his father "crying like a child" as the other prisoners take advantage of him. In this role reversal, Eliezer has become a man, while his father has become more like a child.  Being thrust in the position of having to take care of his father is one way in which Eliezer has changed.

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In Elie Wiesel's Night, how does Eliezer go through a major change because of his circumstances and understand a new world?

Elie also finds himself repulsive when he does things and witnesses things without offering his help as he would have when circumstances were different.  For instance, he runs away from his father and hopes in the back of his mind that his father will not find him again since his father is draining him of energy which Elie needs to survive.  Elie also is quite disgusted with himself for watching the fights in the car over a piece of bread. He watches as people are crushed and beaten to death over a bite of bread and compares them to animals.  Even though they are all starving, he wishes the people throwing the bread into the cars wouldn't do it as there is never enough to feed everyone and all it does is cause horrors.

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In Elie Wiesel's Night, how does Eliezer go through a major change because of his circumstances and understand a new world?

"Never shall I forget those moments which murdered my God and my Soul and turned my dreams to dust."  This is how Elie Wiesel describes his feelings as a result of living in the camps. Elie suffers a crisis of his faith due to the deplorable living conditions of the camp and watching his father and others around him slowly die an agonizing death. This is when he goes through a major change of trying to reconcile what's happening to him and all the other Jews with the beliefs he's been taught about God. He doesn't reject God, but he does decide that he "no longer accepted God's silence". Elie changes his views that God is a just and merciful God, but he also comes to a decision that he will not allow the camps to kill him. Survival becomes his only goal, and realizes that "something within me revolted against death."  His religious teaching hasn't prepared him for understanding anything like the death camps, and he depends upon himself, the man, to survive.

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