Describe the character Moshe the Beadle in Night.

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Moche' the Beadle is the first character we are introduced to in Elie Wiesel's "Night."  He was the janitor, or the man who did everything, at the Hasidic synagogue.  Physically, he is described by Elie on page 1:

"Physically he was as awkward as a clown.  He made people smile, with his waif-like timidity. I loved his great, dreaming eyes, their gaze lost in the distance."

He was very poor but still liked by everyone. He did not have shoes. He dressed and lived humbly. He sang a lot but didn't speak much.  He had a way of making himself "insignificant.  As Elie states, he did not embarrass anyone and they were not uncomfortable in his presence.  He was Elie's first teacher of the Hasidic traditions because Elie's father told him to read the Talmud instead of studying Hasidic dogma.

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I think that Moshe would have to be described as someone who does not look as if there is an immediate command of respect.  He is described as "physically awkward."  I always envision him to look as if he has been cast out of society. His look of an outsider would be enhanced with clothes that are not form fitting or representative of the upper echelon of wealth.  Wiesel uses the descriptive term of "poor barefoot of Sighet"  to enhance this.  Moshe looks this way and this is reflected in the lack of power he has in the village. He is tolerated in the village and his appearance would reflect this level of tolerance as opposed to full fledged acceptance.

It is evident that Moshe is not fully respected because he is not taken seriously.  His words of warning are greeted with scorn by the villagers.  They reject him and discredit him.  In this, his physical appearance matches the emotional reaction he receives from the villagers.  It is here in which Wiesel's description matches what he receives as one of the first examples of dehumanization that is such a part of the narrative.

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What are some characteristics of Moishe the Beadle from Night?

Moishe the beadle is a very influential character in Night even though he doesn't make too many appearances. The most important thing about him is his faith, more specifically the mystical variant of Judaism to which he adheres. Moshe comes to represent Elie's ceaseless struggles with his own faith, one of the major themes of the book. At times he can come across as a tad complacent, or even naive, yet his faith gives him a much broader, more cosmic perspective on life, one that allows him to make sense of the horrors inflicted on the Jews by their Nazi captors.

Moshe's spiritual quest is never-ending; he's always asking questions of God. But one thing he won't do is question God Himself. That's where Elie eventually parts company with Moshe; Elie does question God. He does this first of all in relation to His perceived failure to intervene and prevent evil. Eventually, he calls God's very existence into question. Yet the asking of such questions is not a sign of a loss of faith, thinks Moshe; rather, such questions are an expression of it. Whether one agrees with Moshe on this point, there's no doubt that he is a man of great wisdom and profundity, someone who provides an important perspective on life in the camp and all its myriad evils.

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Who is Moshe the Beadle, from Elie Wiesel's Night?

"They call him Moshe the Beadle." This is the first line from Elie Wiesel's novella Night. Moshe the Beadle is the first character readers are introduced to. He is a poor "jack-of-all-trades," who lives in "utter penury" (poverty). Elie, the protagonist and author, desires to learn the Kabbalah. After Elie's father deems him too young to study Kabbalah, Elie decides to find his own teacher. Elie found his teacher in Moshe. 

Moshe also holds another important position in the text. Taken by Hungarians, Moshe returns to Signet to warn others of the their fate. Everyone believed him to be lying or in need of sympathy. No one listened to Moshe, the one who knew what was to come. When the Nazis arrive to remove the Jewish people from their village, Moshe flees from the town. 

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