Cover image of Night Journal and Sketchbook

Night Journal and Sketchbook

by jdellinger

  • Release Date: February 12, 2019
  • Age Levels: Grade 10
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Excerpt

Night & Farewell to Manzanar Journal & Sketchbook

  • For this unit, you will be asked to keep a sketchbook- journal. This is a combination of sketches and written responses to the story. You will be required to make a written entry for each chapter in the novel.
  • First, decide on the format for your sketchbook-journal. Spend some time decorating your cover and setting up the book.
  • Make sure to include the number of each chapter (1-9) and the pagenumbers in your copy of the book. Also date each entry.
  • You can sketch memorable scenes from the chapters, paste in magazine pictures, or use computer clip art. Even if you do not consider yourself a good artist, try to make some sketches.
  • Use colors that remind you of the mood of the story. You may want to take photographs and put them in the sketchbook-journal.
  • The written entries should focus on your response to the literature, andshould not merely be chapter summaries. See attached sheet for journal ideas. They should include comments about your thoughts and feelings while reading, any questions you have, and predictions about the next chapter.
  • There are suggested journal questions for each chapter, you do not have to use these, but you can use them as a starting point.
  • Try to write at least one page for each entry.

Possible Journal Topics for Night: Section 1, pages 1-20:

  • Write your responses to the book so far. You might also list questions and comments that come to mind as you read this part of the book.
  • The word night is a key word in this section of the book. What does the word mean early in the first chapter? How does the meaning change as the story progresses?
  • The narrator from time to time breaks away from the story to tell the reader about something that happened later or to ask a question. Why do you think he has chosen to do so? How is he preparing you for the rest of the story?
  • The narrator mentions a number of events in this section that take place for the first
  • Why do you think the author has chosen to draw your attention to them?

Sections 2, 3, pages 21-43:

  • Write your responses to this section of the book. You might also record any questions or comments you have about the reading.
  • What did you find surprising or difficult to understand in this section of the book?
  • The word night takes on new meaning in this section of the book. What has the word come to symbolize? How are the words fire and flame used in this section of the book? What do you think these words mean to the narrator?

Section 4, pages 45-62:

  • Write your responses to this section of the book. You might also list any questions you have about anything you read in this part of the book.
  • The word hunger takes on new meaning in this section of the book. What does the word mean to Eliezer? What other words have taken on new meaning in this section of the book?

Section 5, pages 63-80:

  • Write your responses to this section of the book. You might also list questions and comments on this part of the book.
  • Night is written in short, simple sentences. Critics call this kind of writing “controlled.” That means that every word has been carefully chosen for a precise meaning. How do you explain the decision to write in a “controlled” or measured way to describe experiences that are beyond control?

About

This assignment is a journal and sketchbook assignment where the students reflect on various chapters of the book Night and relate it to their own experiences.