What steps does Madame Loisel take to prepare for the party in "The Necklace"?

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In "The Necklace," there are two steps Madame Loisel must take before she is willing to attend the party. The first involves the purchase of a new dress, and the second involves borrowing the jewelry she feels is needed to accompany it. It is only after she has borrowed the diamond necklace from Madame Forestier that she feels she can make a suitable appearance at the ball.

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In the short story titled "The Necklace" by Guy de Maupassant, a young woman named Mathilde Loisel yearns to break into a higher social standing and live a life of lavish wealth. She rejects her current status and dreams of a day when she can move into a larger home and enjoy the amenities of those beyond her socioeconomic standing. When her husband receives an invitation to a prestigious ball, Mathilde gets her chance. However, she is instantly discouraged by the fact she has nothing to wear. Mathilde believes she needs certain accoutrement to ensure she fits the part of an elite member of society. Without the right look, she feels as though she cannot participate.

First, Mathilde feels she needs an expensive dress to fit in with the others attending the ball. To acquire the dress, her husband forgoes the 400 francs he'd been saving to buy a hunting gun. Thinking this gesture would be enough to placate his wife, he makes the sacrifice to ensure she is happy. However, after the dress is purchased, Mathilde is dissatisfied once again, desiring more to attain the perfect look.

Next, Mathilde feels she needs jewelry to reflect wealth and sophistication which will complete her outfit and prove to others (and herself) that she is worthy of this invitation. To acquire the jewelry, Mathilde's husband suggests borrowing something from her rich friend Madame Forestier, since they cannot afford to make any other purchases. Mathilde finds a beautiful diamond necklace in Madame Forestier's collection and decides it's the perfect addition to her ensemble.

With an expensive dress and a diamond necklace, Mathilde feels worthy of the invitation, lacking any and all remorse of what it took to acquire her look. However, her greed and insecurity end up harming her in the end, ironically pushing her into a lower social class. Her choices and their consequences reveal how much the Loisels truly had to lose in the first place.

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In Guy de Maupassant's "The Necklace," Mathilde Loisel is depicted as dissatisfied with her life. The wife of bureaucrat, she desires nothing less than to enjoy a life of wealth and social prestige, feeling as if she was made for a higher social stratum than the one she occupies.

When her husband brings up the subject of their invitation to the ball, Mathilde is initially unwilling to accept this invitation, on the grounds that she lacks a suitable dress to wear. Ultimately, she agrees to attend the ball on the condition that she purchase a new gown for the occasion (estimating that it would require a sum of four hundred francs). Her husband agrees.

However, even after this dress has been purchased, Madame Loisel remains unsatisfied. Mathilde is a character driven by vanity, and she desperately wishes to project an image of class, wealth, and sophistication. Thus, she again resists the idea of attending the ball, this time on the grounds that she lacks suitable jewelry or ornamentation. Here, her husband suggests she visit her friend, Madame Forestier, who can loan her the jewelry she desires. Mathilde does so, and as she looks through her friend's jewelry, she discovers the diamond necklace and asks to borrow it. Only after this point does Mathilde feel that her appearance is suitable for the ball.

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In Guy De Maupassant's short story "The Necklace," Madame Loisel does many things to dress for the ball in the way she deems appropriate.

First, she negotiates with her husband on what amount of money should be used to purchase a dress for the event. Initially, she refuses to go because she has nothing to wear. Here is a quote from their conversation:

"She thought for a moment, computing the cost, and also wondering what amount she could ask for without an immediate refusal and an alarmed exclamation from the thrifty clerk.

At last she answered hesitantly:

'I don't know exactly, but I think I could do it with four hundred francs.'

He turned a little pale, because he had been saving that exact amount to buy a gun and treat himself to a hunting trip the following summer, in the country near Nanterre, with a few friends who went lark-shooting there on Sundays.

However, he said:

'Very well, I can give you four hundred francs. But try and get a really beautiful dress.'"

Next, she visits a childhood friend whom she had avoided because the friend is rich and Madame Loisel suffered from jealousy when she was around her. Her friend, Madame Forestier, agrees to lend her some jewels for the event. She looks through Madame Forestier's collection and is still dissatisfied. She asks Madame Forestier if she has anything else. She finds a diamond necklace in a black satin box and asks if Madame Forestier will lend it to her. Madame Forestier agrees. Finally, after securing a dress she deems suitable, and a beautiful necklace, Madame Loisel is satisfied, for a while. She attends the party, and everyone is charmed by her beauty and grace.

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In the short story "The Necklace," what does Mme. Loisel want to wear to the party besides the dress? How does she acquire it?

In the short story "The Necklace" Madame Loisel wants to get a dress for the ball given by the Ministry of Education. She is already depressed that she only has one dress to wear, which is the dress with which she goes to the opera, so her husband offers to buy her a new one. Madame Loisel tells her husband that she could get one for 400 francs. However, this is the amount of money that her husband had been saving to get a hunting gun for a trip that he was planning on going to the next summer. Nevertheless, the good man gave her the 400 francs. Still, Madame was not happy.

"I'm utterly miserable at not having any jewels, not a single stone, to wear," she replied. "I shall look absolutely no one. I would almost rather not go to the party."

The solution that the husband proposes at first is that she wears "flowers" in her hair, and things of that nature. However, Madame Loisel wanted to be flashy and really call the attention of everyone. As such, her husband proposes a second option: Madame will go to visit her well-to-do friend, Madame Forrestier, and she will ask to borrow a piece of jewelry from her. 

This is the pivotal action that sets the plot forward. It is after the selection of the necklace, a very flashy and showy one, that Madame Loisel feels truly like herself. She is ravishing and wild and the party, and then she looses the necklace! Rather than admit to her friend what happened, she decides to replace the necklace on her own at great and life-changing sacrifices to the marriage. In the end, we realize that the piece is fake and all of the years of working to replace it had come and gone in vain. 

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How does Madame Loisel go about getting something special to wear to the party in the story "The Necklace"?

Mathilde Loisel struggles to accept the reality of her situation and constantly dreams of enjoying a life of luxury instead of living paycheck to paycheck. Mathilde's husband is a clerk at the Ministry of Public Instruction and makes enough money to keep food on the table but not enough to please his ungrateful wife. When Mathilde Loisel learns that she and her husband have been invited to a ball at the Ministry, she initially refuses to go because she does not have any fancy, expensive clothing or jewelry. Mathilde's husband reluctantly gives her four hundred francs to buy a lovely dress, but she is still upset at the fact that she does not have any jewelry to wear along with her outfit. He then suggests that Mathilde ask her friend Madame Forestier if she could borrow a piece of expensive jewelry. Madame Forestier allows Mathilde Loisel to borrow a diamond necklace to wear with her dress for the ball. However, Mathilde Loisel is not aware that Madame Forestier's necklace is made with imitation diamonds and so is not the extremely expensive piece of jewelry that it appears to be. Tragically, Mathilde Loisel loses the necklace and works for the next ten years to pay for an authentic replica of the diamond necklace that she borrowed.

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How does Madame Loisel go about getting something special to wear to the party in the story "The Necklace"?

In "The Necklace," Mathilde Loisel goes to her friend, Mrs. Forrestier, to borrow the necklace for the ball.  Mathilde had told her husband that she had no fine jewelry or a dress to wear to the party, so her husband gave her money to purchase a dress (he had saved up money to buy himself something).  He also suggested that she go see Mrs. Forrestier to borrow some jewelry for the evening.  Mrs. Forrestier agreed; however, she did not tell Mathilde that it was a fake diamond necklace. Mathilde lost it at the ball, as we know, and then she and her husband had to work for 10 years to pay off the necklace.  In the end, Mathilde finds out the necklace was fake to begin with and that is how the story ends.

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