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Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave

by Frederick Douglass

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What are the results of Frederick Douglass' escape from slavery?

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One of the most powerful elements to emerge from Douglass' escape is the idea of creating social solidarity.  Douglass never loses sight of connecting his struggle to a larger one.  For example, Douglass does not give many details on how he escapes so that he does not jeopardize such a method of escape for others.  When he settles in the North, Douglass commits himself to the abolitionist cause.  He does not see himself as one who is alone.  It is not as if Douglass gets his freedom and turns his back on others in a similar predicament.  Rather, he sees his struggle as a broader one connected to others.  In this construction of freedom, one of the strongest and most evident realities to result from Douglass' escape is to ensure that individuals view themselves as part of a larger whole.  Individual action and freedokm is geared towards this end in Douglass' configuration.

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