Quotes

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Last Reviewed on June 19, 2019, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 282

Jules Verne is an amazing writer, and so there is an embarrassment of riches when it comes to quotes from this book. Here are some quotes that also underline important themes.

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It is a great misfortune to be alone, my friends; and it must be believed that solitude can quickly destroy reason.

These words come from the mouth of Cyrus Harding, the leader of the colonists. He speaks these words after the colonists find Ayrton, who has been isolated from human companionship. He is in direct contrast to the community that the colonists have. All of this emphasizes the importance of companionship and working together.

I can undertake and persevere even without hope of success.

These words come in the context of describing Cyrus Harding. He is a man as tough as nails. He knows how to persevere and make the most of every situation. The above quote is actually the motto of William of Orange, of the seventeenth century.

Here is another quote that summarizes the men's careful preparation. In other words, they possessed incredible foresight.

"Better to put things at the worst at first," replied the engineer, "and reserve the best for a surprise."

Finally, the following words show what motivated the men to cultivate the island and make it into a home. The labor that these men exerted was tremendous. What made them do it all? This quote explains it.

So is man's heart. The desire to perform a work which will endure, which will survive him, is the origin of his superiority over all other living creatures here below. It is this which has established his dominion, and this it is which justifies it, over all the world.

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